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Caliper
Zurichman wrote:
Was looking for some stats on my Roker today when I found a 54 cm Roker on Ebay used for $1400 or $1450 forget which. That seems to be a great price to me.


Zman


It sure is (I noticed that eBay listing also), but 54 is certainly too small for me! Trying to figure out places to find bikes for test rides but few opportunities and a full schedule, this past weekend was booked so maybe next...  
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squak
ChillyWilly wrote:
The Roker Comp is a great bike and I love mine a lot. But you said "race bike" and I think that might mean that the Roker is not quite for you.
The two issues I see are the geometry and the groupset. 

The first thing to consider is geometry. The Roker has a 440mm chainstay length, a fairly slack head tube, and a lot of stack. That makes it a great bike for a long comfortable ride on gravel roads. But it's not exactly racey. 
The Salsa Warbird or the Jamis Renegade aren't really all that much different, but they lean more towards the fast and race-like than the Roker. They don't have as much headtube and stack at least, and will give you a faster position for sure.  (Also look at Noble bikes. The guy who designed the Roker is doing those. But I think they're 1x only, so maybe not?)

And then there's drivetrain/groupset. I love my 1x group. Love. But it's not really race appropriate. Go read Guitar Ted's rants against 1x. (Sorry, GT - it's a rant. But you're not wrong.) You don't get as wide of a gear range. You get bigger hops between gears. I am totally happy with 1x for myself. If it's a >10% grade hill I'll probably be walking it if it's longer than 100 yards. And I'm okay with that. And on the downhills I'm perfectly happy coasting at 30mph - I don't need to pedal to get the last little bit of speed out of my downhill run. 
But if you're going to be racing on anything other than practically level gravel, you're going to want the range of gears that 2x gives you. Hopping off to trudge up the side of the road while getting passed by people is not cool. And you're going to want the efficiency of being able to pick the gear to get you just the right cadence. 

Geometry and 1x drivetrain make the Roker Comp a poor choice for gravel racing?  What do you consider “race” geometry on a gravel bike and what are the advantages?  I consider a slightly taller stack height to be a good thing when it comes to all-day comfort and speed.  It seems like most people negate any perceived or real benefit of a short stack height by putting 40mm of spacers under the stem anyway.  I also consider a relatively slack head angle and longer chainstays to be a good thing for a gavel race bike, i.e. stability and predictable steering/handling on fast gravel descents.  I don’t need or want my gravel bike to handle like a crit racer.

1x vs 2x?  Different strokes for different folks.  Either is fine for gravel racing and 1x has plenty of range.  My previous gravel bike was 2x (30/42 x 11-34) and I prefer my current 1x setup (40 x 11-46) in nearly every situation.  I believe all the Dirty Kanza winners were on 1x this year—that must count for something.  
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Zurichman
squak wrote:

Geometry and 1x drivetrain make the Roker Comp a poor choice for gravel racing?  What do you consider “race” geometry on a gravel bike and what are the advantages?  I consider a slightly taller stack height to be a good thing when it comes to all-day comfort and speed.  It seems like most people negate any perceived or real benefit of a short stack height by putting 40mm of spacers under the stem anyway.  I also consider a relatively slack head angle and longer chainstays to be a good thing for a gavel race bike, i.e. stability and predictable steering/handling on fast gravel descents.  I don’t need or want my gravel bike to handle like a crit racer.

1x vs 2x?  Different strokes for different folks.  Either is fine for gravel racing and 1x has plenty of range.  My previous gravel bike was 2x (30/42 x 11-34) and I prefer my current 1x setup (40 x 11-46) in nearly every situation.  I believe all the Dirty Kanza winners were on 1x this year—that must count for something.  


I really don't know what a race bike is suppose to feel like. I come to this gravel riding with a cheapo Schwinn mt. bike that probably weighed about 30 lbs. I started out witht he 2016 Raleigh Tamland 1 because of the killer price and not sure if I would luv gravel riding or not. It weighed 25 lbs and if only riding in Kansas and that area it would be great. For the massive hills here on the East Coast it is too heavy for me. I will also admit that I am out of shape so that plays in it some. At my end I plan on riding some longer rides over 100+ miles so the Roker works for me. What I really dislike at bout my Roker is the 1x but maybe that is just me. My last ride/race kind of confirmed this to me. We were riding on a rails n trails road. We weren't going that fast but I was shifting my gears all over the place to try and stay the same speed as him. I would guess that the bottom 4-5 gears has too much jump and gaps in them. You could get the Sport that has the 2x and only weighs 2 1/2 lbs more. Had I had it to do over that is what I probably would have done. Good luck


Zman
If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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Involuntarysoul
where are Raleigh frame manufactured? Taiwan or mainland China?
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Mark_Landsaat
@involuntarysoul The Raleigh frames are manufactured in China as well as the assembly. There is also a Taiwan connection, because most of Raleigh's manufacturing partners are operating in China, but have Taiwanese ownership. ðŸ‘

Guy that does a little of everything at Noble Bikes
 

https://www.noble-bikes.com/


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Involuntarysoul
@involuntarysoul The Raleigh frames are manufactured in China as well as the assembly. There is also a Taiwan connection, because most of Raleigh's manufacturing partners are operating in China, but have Taiwanese ownership. ÃƒÂ°Ã…¸â€˜Â


that is what I am afraid of, most reputable carbon manufacturing factories are in Taiwan (Giant, Specialized, Trek, Canyon etc) mainland China is known for $500 open molds with questionable QC
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Mark_Landsaat
@involuntarysoul While it is true that some reputable brands manufacture in Taiwan, it is also true that many reputable brands manufacture their carbon frames in China (or Vietnam for that matter) and they are not using factories with questionable QC.

Making carbon frames is very labor intense and the cost of labor is lower in China than it is in Taiwan. It is for this reason that a lot of Taiwanese manufacturers have facilities in China. The process, engineering and quality control is exactly the same as it would be in one of their facilities in Taiwan, but with less overhead. This means frames can be produced more cost effective, but to exactly the same standards as any other facility.

Where things get more questionable is if you purchase a no-name open model frame. I do agree that it is often unclear what the quality of this product is. However, if you purchase a carbon bike from a reputable company that stands behind their product it really doesn't matter where it is produced in the world. As long as the process, layup, engineering, QC and testing is done to a high standard.

I used to work for Raleigh, so I know this supplier quite well and based on my experience with many different suppliers, I believe that they are a great supplier with very good quality. And just for the record, that supplier is one of the Taiwanese owned facilities.

As long as you purchase from a reputable brand, I wouldn't be concerned one bit where the actual frame was manufactured.

Guy that does a little of everything at Noble Bikes
 

https://www.noble-bikes.com/


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chas
I agree.  China makes some great stuff when the QC is there with a reputable brand.  Its when going off brand where I have no idea what (if any) quality control is applied to what I buy.   The latter can be hit or miss.
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Zurichman
@involuntarysoul The Raleigh frames are manufactured in China as well as the assembly. There is also a Taiwan connection, because most of Raleigh's manufacturing partners are operating in China, but have Taiwanese ownership. Ã°Å¸â€˜Â


Mark I though there was a discussion on this before and that you said that the frames were manufactured in Taiwan but then the bikes were painted and assembled in China so yes they could put the sticker on them made in China even though the frame wasn't manufactured there.

Zman
If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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Mark_Landsaat
@zurichman,

I don't recall ever stating that the frames were manufactured in Taiwan. Frame and fork are manufactured by the same company, they used to be located in the Shenzhen area and have recently moved to the Xiamen area.

Like I said in my post above, the company is Taiwanese owned, but the manufacturing facility is in China. As it is for many of the brands we know and love.

Guy that does a little of everything at Noble Bikes
 

https://www.noble-bikes.com/


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Zurichman
Somebody else must have wrote that. You being from Raleigh you should know where they were/are being manufactured. It might not be the fastest race bike out there but I am digging my Roker except for the 1x which I probably will switch out in the future. I went down South this weekend to get away from the tundra land here in Pa. to ride the Swamp Fox Gravel Fondo @ Huger SC. It was very nice organized ride/race. DSCN1069.jpg  DSCN1027.jpg  DSCN1038.jpg  DSCN1045.jpg  DSCN1047.jpg  DSCN1049.jpg  DSCN1055.jpg  DSCN1054.jpg  DSCN1062.jpg  DSCN1064.jpg  DSCN1066.jpg
If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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DPCX
Zurichman wrote:


Mark I though there was a discussion on this before and that you said that the frames were manufactured in Taiwan but then the bikes were painted and assembled in China so yes they could put the sticker on them made in China even though the frame wasn't manufactured there.

Zman


@Zurichman, that was probably me who said that. However, we were talking about the Tamland not the Roker. The steel frames are produced in Taiwan but painted & assembled in China. 😁

BTW, sweet pics!! 

DP
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Zurichman
DPCX wrote:


@Zurichman, that was probably me who said that. However, we were talking about the Tamland not the Roker. The steel frames are produced in Taiwan but painted & assembled in China. ðŸ˜

BTW, sweet pics!! 

DP


Well Mark was the designer of both of those bikes at Raleigh before he left to form Noble bikes. So I guess he knows his stuff.

Luv the bike but at some time will go 2x Shimano.

Zman
If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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DPCX
Zurichman wrote:


Well Mark was the designer of both of those bikes at Raleigh before he left to form Noble bikes. So I guess he knows his stuff.

Luv the bike but at some time will go 2x Shimano.

Zman


exactly! And Mark was my boss at Raleigh and I help him with Noble too. 😉
Check your old private message's, that's where we talked about it. 
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Zurichman
DPCX wrote:


exactly! And Mark was my boss at Raleigh and I help him with Noble too. 😉
Check your old private message's, that's where we talked about it. 


My bad claiming Senior moment here.
If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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DPCX
Zurichman wrote:


My bad claiming Senior moment here.


Haha! We all have them. 😉 
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Zurichman
DPCX hoping you or Mark can jump in here and give me some advice on my Roker. I thought my Roker xplor mso rear tire was giving me problems. After the Saluda Roubaix ride this weekend(rear tire was breaking loose) I took my bike to the LBS. Seems the rear stock wheel is loose and can be wobbled a good what looks to be 3/4" My mechanic said that the rear wheel needs repacked with grease to tighten it up. Is that normal for a stock wheel @ 1000 miles?

Thanks
Zman
If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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squak
Zurichman wrote:
DPCX hoping you or Mark can jump in here and give me some advice on my Roker. I thought my Roker xplor mso rear tire was giving me problems. After the Saluda Roubaix ride this weekend(rear tire was breaking loose) I took my bike to the LBS. Seems the rear stock wheel is loose and can be wobbled a good what looks to be 3/4" My mechanic said that the rear wheel needs repacked with grease to tighten it up. Is that normal for a stock wheel @ 1000 miles?

Thanks
Zman


I think your mechanic may have misdiagnosed the problem.  Repacking a hub suggests it has cup/cone loose bearings.  I'm pretty sure the rear hub on the Roker Comp is an unmarked Novatec with cartridge bearings (not loose) and lack of grease wouldn't cause your wheel to wobble.  My guess is that the end caps on your hub are loose and simply tightening them will fix the wheel wobble.  All you need is two 17mm wrenches (or 2 adjustable wrenches).  Take the wheel out, put a wrench on either side, snug it up and you should be good to go.

It's not unusual for that type of rear hub to work itself loose over time. I have almost 4000 miles on those wheels the bearings are still buttery smooth.

Good luck.
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Mark_Landsaat
Hi Zman, squak is correct. The Roker is using Novatec hubs. One of the hubs we used was the D772SB. Novatec actually has an instruction video on Youtube for bearing replacement. I don't know if this is the hub that is on your bike, but it may be helpful.

I do agree with squak that the bearings shouldn't be repacked. If there is a problem with cartridge bearings you typically replace them with new ones.

Guy that does a little of everything at Noble Bikes
 

https://www.noble-bikes.com/


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Zurichman
Thanks Mark. At least I know now what was making my bike breaking loose(thought it was the tires) on the rear while somewhat flying down on the downhills. Getting some new race wheels for it in the next week. Is that what you had in mind for the Roker when you made it. Luvin  the bike not so much on the 1x. Probably pm you some on ?'s on changing over to 2x. thanks

Zman DSCN1162.jpg
If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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DPCX
Hey Zman, 
Yup, what they said, LOL. Surprised you haven't gotten used to the 1X yet. I was 2X on my Roker for a long time and just recently built up a Noble GX3 (1X) and am really digging the 1X. To each his own though. If I go 2X again it will be with SRAM eTap AXS. 🙂 

DP
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Zurichman
DPCX wrote:
Hey Zman, 
Yup, what they said, LOL. Surprised you haven't gotten used to the 1X yet. I was 2X on my Roker for a long time and just recently built up a Noble GX3 (1X) and am really digging the 1X. To each his own though. If I go 2X again it will be with SRAM eTap AXS. 🙂 

DP


I still think that the 1x is kind of ok when I am riding alone. Having the 2 Raleigh bikes the Tamland 1 which is 5 lbs heavier than the Roker and has the Shimano 2x  with mechanical disk brakes and then the Roker with 1x. Riding with a group on the Roker I am shifting all over the place to try and ride with them. I also have a pretty tough climbing test for a gravel bike It's a 2 mile mt. climb at a solid 7-8% climb. I trashed my Garmin Edge 520 on my Roker and was waiting for a new one. I climbed the same mt. with the Tamland and it actually felt easier which is crazy. Might PM you to get some 2x thoughts.

Thanks
Zman
If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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langdalek
Zman,
I have the same roker comp as you. I have re-geared mine with a 38t absolute black oval chainring and an 11-46 sunrace rear cassette. I live in southern California and ride this bike predominately on the dirt and tackle some pretty steeps climbs. This bike is now a dream to ride after ditching the 42 chainring and the 11-42 cassette. You may not need to go this low on the gearing but it has certainly improved the climbing ability. I think once you get your chainring/rear cassette where you want it, you will enjoy the 1x much more. I hope this helps!

Kerry 
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Zurichman
langdalek wrote:
Zman,
I have the same roker comp as you. I have re-geared mine with a 38t absolute black oval chainring and an 11-46 sunrace rear cassette. I live in southern California and ride this bike predominately on the dirt and tackle some pretty steeps climbs. This bike is now a dream to ride after ditching the 42 chainring and the 11-42 cassette. You may not need to go this low on the gearing but it has certainly improved the climbing ability. I think once you get your chainring/rear cassette where you want it, you will enjoy the 1x much more. I hope this helps!

Kerry 


Kerry the biggest or one of the biggest problem I have with the Roker is the big jumps in the lower gears. When you are riding by yourself no problem. When you are riding with a group you are shifting all over the place to try and match their pace. Curious as to whether you paint on your bike dings easily mine sure does.

Zman
If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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langdalek
Yeah, I get the shifting all over the place. I have not noticed my paint chipping excessively, but I will probably need to inspect it a little more carefully next ride.

Kerry
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