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ivank
It is Pantone 2019. The seatpost is Pantone 276.
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rfutrell
Carbonda just sent me photos of my painted CFR696 frame and it looks pretty good!  The colors are Pantone 187C in metallic that fades to matte black.  It will be shipped out tomorrow, so when I get it in a few weeks, I'll take some more photos. 4c0a549b6a67af856db007efbe06110.jpg  b86349f88229c28d2dd726b72b18f09.jpg 
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ivank
Frame is Pantone 2019. Seatpost is 276. I've ordered painting of the seatpost just to prevent slippage.
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falkenhk
Does anyone know the standover height on the 696? The small 505 would be good at 750, but my max standover, per my fitter, is 763. I do not see any numbers posted for the 696. I used the OB1 for the 505. Any information would be helpful. Pulling the trigger on Friday once I know which frame. All the info posted is SUPER helpful.
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falkenhk
Added note to above post, looking at size S - 505 and size 52 on 696. Thanks again.
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caheld
Hello all,

Just had my first real issue with my CFR505- was on a long ride on Saturday and while on an innocuous section of road (no hard hits or anything) one of the two seat clamp bolts sheared in half, leaving me seatless and off balance.  Luckily was able to save myself from a crash, but could have been catastrophic.  

To be fair, I'm not necessarily blaming Carbonda as this is the second seat clamp bolt I've sheared in half in two years-- last year it happened on a Giant Defy and ended in a crash that left me super injured and the bike in rough shape (part of the reason I got a Carbonda). While I'm a big rider at 225lb (100kg), I wouldn't think I'm so big I'm outside the realm of standard riders, especially for a 60cm frame (I'm just a tall, solidly-built, fit guy, not obese or something)...  Certainly tolerances for bolts must account for people bigger than me!?!  And, in case you think it was user error, the seat clamp had been torqued to the specs of my (carbon railed) seat and should be pretty standard I'd think, while last time it was torqued to the exact specs from Giant.  While the CFR505 has seen a lot of use in one season-- around 3,000 miles so far, it is young enough that I wouldn't expect things to be giving out.  Soooo, is it just that parts aren't built for people my size?  Are Giant and Carbonda both sourcing poor quality bolts?  

Just putting this out there as a warning and I guess to see if others have ever experienced this, or if there are recommendations on replacement bolts (go titanium for strength or is it too rigid?  Aluminum for flexibility instead of shearing in half?  Clearly steel is not working well for me...). Appreciate any suggestions or thoughts on this,

-Cam
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Colt__Seavers
caheld wrote:
Hello all,

Just had my first real issue with my CFR505- was on a long ride on Saturday and while on an innocuous section of road (no hard hits or anything) one of the two seat clamp bolts sheared in half, leaving me seatless and off balance.  Luckily was able to save myself from a crash, but could have been catastrophic.  

To be fair, I'm not necessarily blaming Carbonda as this is the second seat clamp bolt I've sheared in half in two years-- last year it happened on a Giant Defy and ended in a crash that left me super injured and the bike in rough shape (part of the reason I got a Carbonda). While I'm a big rider at 225lb (100kg), I wouldn't think I'm so big I'm outside the realm of standard riders, especially for a 60cm frame (I'm just a tall, solidly-built, fit guy, not obese or something)...  Certainly tolerances for bolts must account for people bigger than me!?!  And, in case you think it was user error, the seat clamp had been torqued to the specs of my (carbon railed) seat and should be pretty standard I'd think, while last time it was torqued to the exact specs from Giant.  While the CFR505 has seen a lot of use in one season-- around 3,000 miles so far, it is young enough that I wouldn't expect things to be giving out.  Soooo, is it just that parts aren't built for people my size?  Are Giant and Carbonda both sourcing poor quality bolts?  

Just putting this out there as a warning and I guess to see if others have ever experienced this, or if there are recommendations on replacement bolts (go titanium for strength or is it too rigid?  Aluminum for flexibility instead of shearing in half?  Clearly steel is not working well for me...). Appreciate any suggestions or thoughts on this,

-Cam


Hi Cam,
It all comes to the material used in these bolts. Steel is not steel and Titan is not Titan. Don't use Aluminum on any bolts which are not bottle holder on a bike with your body weight!!!
Titan might work, but the alloy makes the difference. There is Titan which has the values like 10.9 steel. Take that one. It can withstand 10Nm torque in M5. Saddle clamp screws being M6 is capable of more torque.
But in general, braking steel bolts on two different bikes is not normal. Either it's material manufacturer fault of the screw or it's users fault. Please make a picture of how you setup the clamps and screws. Are they angled? And how do you tighten the screws. Tighten one to full torque and then start to torque the second? That would mean the stress increases in the first screw way more than the initial torque did. Tighten screws is always a small step process when having more than one screw like on stem or saddle clamp. 
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caheld
Colt,

Thanks for the response-- will definitely look into titanium options.  As far as a photo, sadly never took a closeup of the seat, and it is now out of commission so can't take one at this point, but attached the best I have.  But, I always do a back and forth process when torquing anything to assure even torque, and can assure you after last year's failure I've been particularly diligent with torque specs on this bike in case that was the issue before.  Seat was pretty much perfectly level, without any angling of the bolts.

Cheers,

-CamIMG_2983.png 



Hi Cam,
It all comes to the material used in these bolts. Steel is not steel and Titan is not Titan. Don't use Aluminum on any bolts which are not bottle holder on a bike with your body weight!!!
Titan might work, but the alloy makes the difference. There is Titan which has the values like 10.9 steel. Take that one. It can withstand 10Nm torque in M5. Saddle clamp screws being M6 is capable of more torque.
But in general, braking steel bolts on two different bikes is not normal. Either it's material manufacturer fault of the screw or it's users fault. Please make a picture of how you setup the clamps and screws. Are they angled? And how do you tighten the screws. Tighten one to full torque and then start to torque the second? That would mean the stress increases in the first screw way more than the initial torque did. Tighten screws is always a small step process when having more than one screw like on stem or saddle clamp. 
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Colt__Seavers
caheld wrote:
Colt,

Thanks for the response-- will definitely look into titanium options.  As far as a photo, sadly never took a closeup of the seat, and it is now out of commission so can't take one at this point, but attached the best I have.  But, I always do a back and forth process when torquing anything to assure even torque, and can assure you after last year's failure I've been particularly diligent with torque specs on this bike in case that was the issue before.  Seat was pretty much perfectly level, without any angling of the bolts.

Cheers,

-CamIMG_2983.png 



Can I take a wild guess? The front screw broke.
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caheld
Yes, this time it was (not on the Giant though).  And the rearward position of the saddle is due to the Brooks rails only fitting in one position on the seat clamp.  Is that the culprit you think?  



Can I take a wild guess? The front screw broke.
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Colt__Seavers
caheld wrote:
Yes, this time it was (not on the Giant though).  And the rearward position of the saddle is due to the Brooks rails only fitting in one position on the seat clamp.  Is that the culprit you think?  


Yeah, that would very much make sense to me. The screw is only made for the tension done by the torque and a little more through dynamic pedalling. But the main force is done through the torquing process. The standard force vector is you pressing down the saddle. But through the very much backward position of the saddle and you being pretty heavy (I'm 110kg too) the force is creating a higher tension in the screw through a moment and a long lever. It's like a seesaw. The rails being lower in the back as in the front are increasing the tension also.  Either get another saddle, or a longer stem to bring the saddle more to the front. A good saddle has a specified clamp region and you are definitely out of that region.
PicsArt_11-11-08.47.29.png 
The next tip doesn't matter the screws but your rails. Carbon fiber rails don't like point pressure. And the Carbonda clamp has 2 touch points on the upper surface of each rails. I'm driving a carbon railed saddle too, but it's only 28€ if the rail cracks, not 5 times that much.
Looks like Brooks wants to have that saddle nose down when looking at their pics
97420.jpg 
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Vlanderen
josines wrote:
Is about carbon flex, or the lack of it. Sorry, I thought it was obvious...

Nice vid. The kid needs to drop off a curb at least to see the top tube/seatpost smash him off the bike. But why in the world did they cut a carbon frame like that? I hope it was a warranty . . .
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jogawild
696 build

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Vlanderen
Anyone try the Carbonda Gravel Bars? 260 grams, nice flare, good reach for me

http://www.carbonda.com/accessory/handlebar/123.html
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kuucheki
I've been curious as well. Might have to order one. Any idea on price?
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harryleesbr
Was looking for a carbon adventure bar high and low beside the main stream Easton AX. This might just work. 
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Vlanderen
kuucheki wrote:
I've been curious as well. Might have to order one. Any idea on price?


No, but good ol' reliable Adam will let me know. I am finalizing a 696 purchase and we've been back and forth. I have bought Chinese carbon bars once before and they were great for my road bike.
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Colt__Seavers
jogawild wrote:
696 build



Sorry pal, that's an OPEN UPPER frame. But it definitely has similarity with the 696
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davist


Sorry pal, that's an OPEN UPPER frame. Bit it definitely has similarity with the 696
  Yeah, the front brake mounts gave it away (among some other things)…  What's the supposed benefit of those mounts?  they look kinda ugly to me (the hardware, anyway)
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Jaydinho
ivank wrote:
Hello to all! I've just received CFR505 frameset from Carbonda:
mJExGPulSDQ.jpg 
My height is 173 centimeters, I've choose size M.
Axles:ynUXEHmGcy4.jpg 
At the first sight frame and seat post looks OK, but the rear end of the frame is quite flexible. I can move the dropouts to each other by approximately one centimeter with my hands. Is this OK for this frame?
In addition, I have a doubt regarding fork. Actually, distance between legs is not exact 100 mm, but 101-101.5 mm. So, there is a 1-1.5 mm gap between hub and fork leg:Fork.jpg 
When I tighten the axle, legs are shifted to each other, and the gap disappears. But my doubts is about internal stress which happens in carbon fiber in the fork. Some pages ago it was described a similar problem which caused fork crash. What should I do with this? Use some 1mm spacer between hub and fork? Send fork back to Carbonda and ask for replacement? Or 1mm gap is in limits of tolerance and this will not be a problem? Please, share your opinions.
Thank you!



So is this gap acceptable? I spoke with Adam and he said it is normal..

I am about to order the 505 and would also like a wheelset. Has anyone had experience with the Carbonda CWRD44C wheelset? Adam says he can supply with dtswiss350 hubs for 620USD..
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ivank
Jaydinho wrote:


So is this gap acceptable?


I've written a mail to Carbonda about this, and their answer was that this is normal, I just need to tighten the axle. Nevertheless, still thinking about sticking 2 slim washers on both sides..
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Colt__Seavers
Jaydinho wrote:



So is this gap acceptable? I spoke with Adam and he said it is normal..

I am about to order the 505 and would also like a wheelset. Has anyone had experience with the Carbonda CWRD44C wheelset? Adam says he can supply with dtswiss350 hubs for 620USD..


I don't know their rim quality. I bought from Light Bicycle and no problems so far. My rims almost having the same values like internal/external width, weight, spoke holes, but only 37mm deep and not 44. As I'm having a cross section of my rim, I can tell you that the side walls are less than 1mm thick. So a 44mm deep profile will be every thinner t some point. A 415g rim with 44m deep profile seems very fragile to me. What's your weight? Carbonda is not stating any max rider weight. Mine are up to 125kg build with Sapim CX Ray and DT 240.

I'm giving you a few important hints:
- use standard flange hubs, no straight pull (makes wheel building way more easier for carbonda and reliable for you
- use DT350 they are cheap, reliable and still leightweight, novatec have a problem with water inleakage and only having pawl freehub with just a few engagements and DT has ratched which you can upgrade to 54 engagements
- use brass nipples when using carbon rims. aluminum nipples corrode fast with carbon+water
- if you want to run high pressure, use a hooked rim
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Colt__Seavers
davist wrote:
  Yeah, the front brake mounts gave it away (among some other things)…  What's the supposed benefit of those mounts?  they look kinda ugly to me (the hardware, anyway)


you don't need the brake caliper adapter and it lokks way more clean like on the rear brake. the brake force is better guided in the fork structure with those carbon bushings going through the whole fork. the normal threaded insert in a carbon fork are a week point for structure failure.
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Jaydinho


I don't know their rim quality. I bought from Light Bicycle and no problems so far. My rims almost having the same values like internal/external width, weight, spoke holes, but only 37mm deep and not 44. As I'm having a cross section of my rim, I can tell you that the side walls are less than 1mm thick. So a 44mm deep profile will be every thinner t some point. A 415g rim with 44m deep profile seems very fragile to me. What's your weight? Carbonda is not stating any max rider weight. Mine are up to 125kg build with Sapim CX Ray and DT 240.

I'm giving you a few important hints:
- use standard flange hubs, no straight pull (makes wheel building way more easier for carbonda and reliable for you
- use DT350 they are cheap, reliable and still leightweight, novatec have a problem with water inleakage and only having pawl freehub with just a few engagements and DT has ratched which you can upgrade to 54 engagements
- use brass nipples when using carbon rims. aluminum nipples corrode fast with carbon+water
- if you want to run high pressure, use a hooked rim


I was looking at the wheelset supplied by Thesis with the OB1 which look the same spec. Adam says they are from the same rim factory so will be the same. I am 75kg, they also do a 38mm depth with 27mm external width so not sure which size to go with. I wouldn't be using tyres less than 32mm anyway. For some reason Carbonda don't make it clear they will supply dtswiss hubs.
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davist


I don't know their rim quality. I bought from Light Bicycle and no problems so far. My rims almost having the same values like internal/external width, weight, spoke holes, but only 37mm deep and not 44. As I'm having a cross section of my rim, I can tell you that the side walls are less than 1mm thick. So a 44mm deep profile will be every thinner t some point. A 415g rim with 44m deep profile seems very fragile to me. What's your weight? Carbonda is not stating any max rider weight. Mine are up to 125kg build with Sapim CX Ray and DT 240.

I'm giving you a few important hints:
- use standard flange hubs, no straight pull (makes wheel building way more easier for carbonda and reliable for you
- use DT350 they are cheap, reliable and still leightweight, novatec have a problem with water inleakage and only having pawl freehub with just a few engagements and DT has ratched which you can upgrade to 54 engagements
- use brass nipples when using carbon rims. aluminum nipples corrode fast with carbon+water
- if you want to run high pressure, use a hooked rim


Rim weight is dependent on diameter of course, not mentioned in either post.  For reference, HED Belgiums in 650b are 469g, Stan's grail carbon are 300g at 700c (yikes)  so I wouldn't think 415 is too out of line for a carbon 650 wheel, for 700c I'd expect closer to 500g.  Agreed on brass nipples, not agreed on J bends, but if a builder can't build either, not sure if I'd want to do business.  
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