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cmcalpin

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Reply with quote  #1 
Weird question for everyone...... I was listening to a podcast yesterday and Jeff Jones was the guest. I have read about him in the last year and even own a set of his bars. Heck i even talked to him on the phone one day when I was shopping for a set of H bars and he looked up my bike and it's geometry and recommended a certain stem length setup with his bars for my bike. He wanted a really short stem like 40-50 and explained his reasoning to me. I tried a 60 (that's what I had on hand) and thought I felt too upright so I settled on a 90 Ritchey 30 degree rise stem and thought that felt nice. I eventually removed those bars and went back to flat bars and a new stem. I haven't been riding this bike much lately (as I don't do much MTB riding anymore) and was looking to breathe some new life into it by setting it back up for gravel. So after listening to Jones on the podcast yesterday it got me wanting to set my hardtail rigid back up for long days on gravel. I got my 90/30 setup back on and again it feels comfy. But I just wanted to ask, How many of you follow that belief of more upright and hands in front of you and how many of you still want to lean forward more? It is well proven that aerodynamics do not come into play until you hit higher speeds so I don't believe in all that aero garbage being spit out by all the manufacturers and I do believe that a lot of riders of all styles fall for what's popular. What say you guys? Upright or leaning forward?
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texastutt

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Reply with quote  #2 
Riding lower has a lot to do with flexablity. Two words: Bike Fit. If you have a proper bike fit, you will know what works, aero is always a factor I don't have my cross/gravel bike slammed as much as when I raced cross because as I've aged the ability to turn my head in the lower position has gotten more difficult, not being in the lower position as I'm still very flexible. But I have friends who are 20 years younger who don't have the same drop I have and they are stronger and faster. Don't do what others do, do what fits you.
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cmcalpin

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by texastutt
Riding lower has a lot to do with flexablity. Two words: Bike Fit. If you have a proper bike fit, you will know what works, aero is always a factor I don't have my cross/gravel bike slammed as much as when I raced cross because as I've aged the ability to turn my head in the lower position has gotten more difficult, not being in the lower position as I'm still very flexible. But I have friends who are 20 years younger who don't have the same drop I have and they are stronger and faster. Don't do what others do, do what fits you.


I agree 100%. I just like what Jeff Jones is preaching and it makes sense and it's actually pretty comfortable to ride that way. But he's definitely going against the grain LOL and I kind of respect that. I just wanted to pose a fun question and see how many people follow this advice.
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Volsung

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Reply with quote  #4 
Unpopular opinion- bike fits are a waste of money.

I finally did one. I brought 2 bikes in (my fat bike and my gravel/commuter) and neither fit in the stand. They took my measurements and surprisingly after years of riding I had figured it out myself and they didn't change anything on my bike.

He did move my cleats, but then I got heel strikes on my chainstays so I moved them back.

I use Jones bars on my fat bike. Getting the angle right can be tricky, as can stem length/rise. The only real way to do it is adjusting it yourself and trying different setups for a bunch of miles.

As for flexibility, I can almost put my palms on the ground when I touch my toes. I ride with 50+mm of headset spacers.
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cmcalpin

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Volsung
Unpopular opinion- bike fits are a waste of money.

I finally did one. I brought 2 bikes in (my fat bike and my gravel/commuter) and neither fit in the stand. They took my measurements and surprisingly after years of riding I had figured it out myself and they didn't change anything on my bike.

He did move my cleats, but then I got heel strikes on my chainstays so I moved them back.

I use Jones bars on my fat bike. Getting the angle right can be tricky, as can stem length/rise. The only real way to do it is adjusting it yourself and trying different setups for a bunch of miles.

As for flexibility, I can almost put my palms on the ground when I touch my toes. I ride with 50+mm of headset spacers.


I've heard so many people say, including several of my buddies, that Jones bars Rock but when it comes to climbing they suck. A lot of my friends will use Jones bars if they are bikepacking or riding long distances but for General mountain biking they put their flat bars back on. But I have done some tight single track with my Jones bars and I never felt like climbing was that bad on them so I don't know if that's just a personal opinion or if I'm special LOL.
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Volsung

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Reply with quote  #6 
They probably had the tilt wrong. If you have the bar ends too low they'd be great IN the saddle but not out. If they're flat then they'd be great OUT but not in.

Jones bars are all about that sweet spot.
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #7 
I have no clue yet on the gravel riding as it's all new to me. I will throw this out there though. I never used aero bars road riding. Yeah if you are a racer it probably gives you somewhat  of an advantage. At my end my stomach doesn't like leaning over on the bike all day. On ultra road riding you pretty much know sooner or later your stomach is going to go out and you need to know what you are going to try next. I will know a little bit more after I get some more miles/races into my legs.


Zman

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moe53

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Reply with quote  #8 
I've been using Mary bars on my rigid mtb for about 10 years, they are somewhat similar to Jones bars, more upright position, hand position angled back. They are great for single track mountain biking, but I really prefer a well designed gravel drop bar for grinding. The Mary bars have limited hand positions, 1 or 2 at the most which is ok for mtb. Good gravel bars have a minimum of 3 and up to 6.  But the Jones bars will work for grinding, but I don't feel they are optimum. IMO  
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #9 
So what is the difference between roadie bars and gravel bars?


Zman 

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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moe53

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Reply with quote  #10 
Gravel bars generally have more choice in width, drop and flare. 
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PMC

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Reply with quote  #11 

I'm firmly in the drop bar camp as I really don't enjoy flat bars or Jones bars unless I'm riding mountain bike trails.  I know Jones bars give you more positions, etc, but having tried them on my fat bike I knew they'd be lost on me for anything more road oriented.  On a gravel bike or road bike I need to be able to get out of the wind and can't do that effectively with either flat or Jones bars.  Good thing I really like drop bars, my favorite being the simple and cheap-ish Salsa Cowbell.  I don't run quite as much drop as my road bike (maybe 2.75 inches vs 3.5 inches) but can spend hours in the drops if needed and have no discomfort.  I guess I just don't like sitting upright.

Saying that - pick whatever floats your boat!  If they work for you I think they're super cool bars.

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chas

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Reply with quote  #12 
When I am riding 20mph+, drop bars make a huge difference. But below 15mph, aero isn't much. It really depends on your graven speed (and wind)
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cmcalpin

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chas
When I am riding 20mph+, drop bars make a huge difference. But below 15mph, aero isn't much. It really depends on your graven speed (and wind)


The gravel ride I went on last night would have been that kind of average. It was nice smooth crushed gravel not much hills. The gravel that's around me a lot of times is big chunky Rock and there is a lot of hills and I don't hit those kind of speeds unless it's a smooth surface that is hard pack. I took my mountain bike with my Jones bars on last night's ride and that was just because I felt bad because the bike hadn't been seeing a lot of action LOL. I get that way sometimes I try to divide my riding between my bikes. I'm not sure if I could pick a clear favorite between these two bicycles
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