The Riding Gravel Forum
Register Calendar Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
NoCoGreg

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 138
Reply with quote  #1 
Any recommendations on which tubeless factory wheels have worked well, or failed miserably, for you?  My connotation of "failed miserably" not only includes mechanical failures (rims, spokes, coming out of true frequently) but I'm also worried about rims which are difficult to get the tire to seat or seam to be prone to burping.

I'm thinking of going tubeless for a set of wheels but all I have are old school rim brake Ksyriums, Fulcrum Racing, CXP-33 and Open Pro's.  Lately I've been partial to the Campy/Fulcrum wheels but again zero experience with tubeless.

I'm also eying a Salsa carbon Warbird so there may be a new GG later this summer so feel free to chime in on which of the disk wheels work as well.

Apologies in advance if there has already been a thread for this but if it exists I couldn't find it.

Cheers,
Greg
0
bobknh

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 521
Reply with quote  #2 
I've had good luck with HED Ardennes, Shimano Durace and Ultegra. But, these are all QR rim brake wheels. My HED Tomcat rims on my OEM disc wheels which came stock on my Haanjo Comp  also performed very well with 2 layers of Stans tape and Orange Seal endurance. The Shimano Ultegra and Durace are TR. They worked well with the pre-installed rim tape; but the valves supplied by Shimano didn't have removable cores. I switched to good old Stan's valves. The Shimano wheels were a few mm narrower than the HED's. None the less, I had no issues mounting 40mm tubeless tires. I've also installed some tires on Bontrager TR rims, using the one piece Bontrager tape and valves with good results. Based on this experience, I'd say that with good tape, good valves, and good TR gravel tires, most wheels and rims will work pretty well. High pressure narrow road tires are another story. I had some bad experiences with Hutch road tires on Mavic Ksyriums. Even though the rim bed of the Ksyriums has no spoke holes, the rim doesn't seat well with TR tires. Big mess in my garage.
0
Smithhammer

Avatar / Picture

Member
Registered:
Posts: 96
Reply with quote  #3 
The WTB TCS system is top-notch, imo. Put the tire on the rim, add some tubeless juice, pump it up. No fuss. 
__________________
Unlearn pavement.
0
Nubster

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 434
Reply with quote  #4 
WTB i23 rims for me. So far they have been great. Probably 1000 miles on my set so far and not a hiccup. WTB tires mounted up with an floor pump super easy. Non-WTB tires took a compressor but still easy. Other than having to lug out the compressor it was actually easier (less labor...lol) than the floor pump. I'm 100% sold on WTB stuff.
0
GHC

Member
Registered:
Posts: 36
Reply with quote  #5 
For Disks (if you go there), another option.

My Ridley x trail came with DT Swiss R460 db wheel set http://www.wheelbuilder.com/dt-swiss-r-460-db-(pre-order-only).html

My first tubeless ready rims, and my first time setting them up.   Taped with 21mm stans tape once around with 7 inch overlap, and mounted a Clement MSO 700 x 36 120tpi tubeless on them and they seated with a hand pump, holding air with no sealant.   Shot two ounces of Orange seal, and away I went.

I don't know much about rims, but am considering another set with skinny road tires, and the DT Swiss appear to be economical for how they are performing for me.    I suspect DT Swiss also has non DB rims too .... I have no idea why DT Swiss doesn't get much talk here....maybe there is good reason .... but they are working great for me, don't break the bank, and are light enough for the $.
0
bobknh

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 521
Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GHC
For Disks (if you go there), another option.

My Ridley x trail came with DT Swiss R460 db wheel set http://www.wheelbuilder.com/dt-swiss-r-460-db-(pre-order-only).html

My first tubeless ready rims, and my first time setting them up.   Taped with 21mm stans tape once around with 7 inch overlap, and mounted a Clement MSO 700 x 36 120tpi tubeless on them and they seated with a hand pump, holding air with no sealant.   Shot two ounces of Orange seal, and away I went.

I don't know much about rims, but am considering another set with skinny road tires, and the DT Swiss appear to be economical for how they are performing for me.    I suspect DT Swiss also has non DB rims too .... I have no idea why DT Swiss doesn't get much talk here....maybe there is good reason .... but they are working great for me, don't break the bank, and are light enough for the $.

One word of caution about tubeless ready "skinny road tires". Because they take high pressure, the sidewalls are very stiff, and special tire beads as well. As a consequence, these can be a nightmare to install and remove. My advice in this category is to go with more supple tires like the Conti 4000 II S with Vittoria Latex tubes. With this combination you can run at 70-80 PSI with 28mm tires, which will roll fast on pavement, soak up minor road bumps like coarse chip seal, be very resistant to pinch flats, and give you a road feel similar to a good tubular (sew-up) tire. In fact, Tony Martin won the Pro World ITT Championship last year with Specialized Clinchers and latex tubes. While tubulars still dominate in the pro peleton, some pro teams are switching gradually to clinchers because of their performance and ease of maintenance.
0
NoCoGreg

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 138
Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobknh
... the rim doesn't seat well with TR tires. Big mess in my garage.

Thanks for all the info and the visual of a high pressure tire with sealant letting loose (burping?). Yikes!

I've been using Orange Sealant (regular, not endurance) in some tubes and it seems to be lasting well (9 months including this past winter).  How often does the endurance have to get topped off or replaced when running tubeless?

0
PastorBillV

Starter
Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #8 
I love my two sets of HED Ardennes.  They roll SO smoothly, handle everything, come in lots of options (especially the FR plus with huge internal width).   AND, you can often find them on sale on Amazon (sold by BackCountry/Competitive Cyclist).   I got one set on Amazon for $900 and BackCountry told me that Amazon put them on that sale - which was below their cost!  You just have to keep watching as Amazon is not always the best deal. 

Good luck!
0
kklasman

Starter
Registered:
Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #9 
I've been riding on Stans Notubes rims tubeless exclusively for well over a year. Arch Ex with Panaracer Gravel King SK (40mm) and Grail with Schwalbe Pro One 23c (measures out at 25) for summer riding (75psi) and Teravail Galena 120 dpi, 32c (45 psi). Stans tape and sealant on all. All mounted up easily, some with a normal floor pump, others with compressor, and hold air quite reliably. I also have a pair of Teravail Lickskillet 28c that I'll probably be switching to soon. The Grails can be found at Performance (with Speed Tuned Wheels hubs, QR with TA adapters) at a very affordable price, which works for me as I'm rather price-sensitive. I have a set and am quite happy with them. Note that I am a rather light (143 lbs) and high-mileage primarily road rider, on the typical mix of good, bad and ugly roads in New England.

I can't imagine ever going back to tubes.
0
bobknh

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 521
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoCoGreg

Thanks for all the info and the visual of a high pressure tire with sealant letting loose (burping?). Yikes!

I've been using Orange Sealant (regular, not endurance) in some tubes and it seems to be lasting well (9 months including this past winter).  How often does the endurance have to get topped off or replaced when running tubeless?


Not a tubeless expert, but the mechanic at my LBS is (retired pro Mtn bike racer). His advice, as long as the tire holds air -- do nothing. When you notice that the tire is going soft overnight- losing pressure faster than normal- add an ounce of sealant. I've followed this advice for almost a year --- without a catastrophe. Good idea to have a spare tube in your seat bag, just in case.
0
bobknh

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 521
Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PastorBillV
I love my two sets of HED Ardennes.  They roll SO smoothly, handle everything, come in lots of options (especially the FR plus with huge internal width).   AND, you can often find them on sale on Amazon (sold by BackCountry/Competitive Cyclist).   I got one set on Amazon for $900 and BackCountry told me that Amazon put them on that sale - which was below their cost!  You just have to keep watching as Amazon is not always the best deal. 

Good luck!

+1 on the Ardennes. I picked up a pair of FR's from Biketiresdirect a month ago for 1/2 price. One thing about the HED hubs -- they have a noisy freewheel. But it is also bullet proof and engages much faster and securely when compared to the old fashioned pall and ratchet design which is quieter.
0
ridemagnetic

Avatar / Picture

Member
Registered:
Posts: 57
Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobknh

+1 on the Ardennes. I picked up a pair of FR's from Biketiresdirect a month ago for 1/2 price. One thing about the HED hubs -- they have a noisy freewheel. But it is also bullet proof and engages much faster and securely when compared to the old fashioned pall and ratchet design which is quieter.


HED still uses the old fashioned pawl and ratchet design. Not that there's anything wrong with that. Their freehubs became louder when they changed to individually sprung pawls with steel plate springs instead of coiled wire and went from a 3 pawl configuration to 5 with the most current hub design.

__________________
Wherever you find yourself is where you ought to be. ~ridemagnetic
0
bobknh

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 521
Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ridemagnetic


HED still uses the old fashioned pawl and ratchet design. Not that there's anything wrong with that. Their freehubs became louder when they changed to individually sprung pawls with steel plate springs instead of coiled wire and went from a 3 pawl configuration to 5 with the most current hub design.

Thanks for the correction -  My mistake. Now I know why the HED freewheels are so noisy. But, they sure work great. One of the things I love about this forum -- there are some folks out there who actually know something -- and a lot more than me.
0
NoCoGreg

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 138
Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobknh
... One of the things I love about this forum -- there are some folks out there who actually know something -- and a lot more than me.

Agreed!

As for loud freehubs, I love my loud Campy hubs when riding on multi-purpose trails/paths.  The more noise the better to make others aware of an approaching bike.  Sounds like the HED's would work great! :-)

0
bobknh

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 521
Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoCoGreg

Agreed!

As for loud freehubs, I love my loud Campy hubs when riding on multi-purpose trails/paths.  The more noise the better to make others aware of an approaching bike.  Sounds like the HED's would work great! :-)


Yes - and they may scare away some bears and moose.
0
owly

Member
Registered:
Posts: 60
Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GHC
 .... I have no idea why DT Swiss doesn't get much talk here....


Easy. Euro company. Most peeps on here are U.S.

Getting another tubeless wheelset built up with XR331. Great rims.


0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation: