The Riding Gravel Forum
Register Calendar Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Slim

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 100
Reply with quote  #1 
If you are planning a gravel ride in wet conditions, keep in mind that brake pads might not last more than 20 miles or so.
Changing the stock organic pads for sintered might help, but your best bet is bringing spares.

http://www.bikeradar.com/us/road/gear/article/sram-vs-shimano-hydraulic-brake-pads-in-wet-grit-video-44489/
0
ridemagnetic

Avatar / Picture

Member
Registered:
Posts: 37
Reply with quote  #2 
I've run both organics and metallics there in terrible weather conditions and other races in MN and never lost brakes. And I descend like a bat outta hell so I'm very sensitive to brake performance. Truth be told there just aren't many braking scenarios on the Almanzo 100. That article is somewhat dated too, originally written in 2015. Sram has already addressed their less than ideal pad retraction since then.

Another solution for foul weather is to use rotors that are less vented. The bigger the vents the more grime and grit gets pulled into the calipers. That was a Sram discovery after their brakes started popping master cylinder seals at Louisville CX Worlds back in 2013, it forced them to take a harder look at the behavior of the system as a whole when dealing with those conditions. They found that larger vents in rotors act like shovels. More specifically on JPow's bike. CX requires more hard braking of course than a gravel race. Just another example of why pads were getting munched.

__________________
Wherever you find yourself is where you ought to be. ~ridemagnetic
0
OTHRider

Member
Registered:
Posts: 39
Reply with quote  #3 
I had a similar failure with the TRP Spyre system that came with my 2014 Giant TCX.  I thought the braking power was more than adequate for my first 500 miles and then I took a foul weather ride.  It was on & off sprinkles in the beginning and all was fine.  We got hit by a 15-minute deluge and after three or four light braking corners I completely lost my brakes.  There was definitely grit up in the rotors but nothing excessive.  Either way, the pads looked like they had been dissolved.

This was February of 2015 and back then I found that a lot of others had the same problem with the TRP's.  I followed what at the time seemed to be the cure and upgraded to Shimano Ice-Tech Ø160mm rotors and Swiss Stop 15 Disc e pads - felt great, stopped very well, no noise and they held up great in the next storms.  No complaints.

When the Swiss Stops finally did wear out, I couldn't find another set locally so I went with Shimano RS 685 (sintered) and they have also been perfect - wet, gritty and dry.
0
ridemagnetic

Avatar / Picture

Member
Registered:
Posts: 37
Reply with quote  #4 
Another interesting thing to think about is how geological make up from region to region affects this. Having lived in Colorado for a few years I noticed the composition of the dirt roads there turns into a super abrasive grinding paste when wet. Majority of the gravel roads in the upper midwest and what you find in abundance at Almanzo are limestone, not nearly as abrasive as what I experienced in Rockies or other places in the Mid-South. 
__________________
Wherever you find yourself is where you ought to be. ~ridemagnetic
0
sgtrobo

Member
Registered:
Posts: 64
Reply with quote  #5 
that's completely bizarre.  I ride in the PNW in cruddy weather all year round, with disk brakes and have never had a set of pads go out in 20 miles.  Heck I've never had a pads last less than about 200-300 miles, and I'm 250#.
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation: