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bobknh

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Reply with quote  #1 
There have been numerous posts about acquiring new bikes - and specifically about frame material. I, and several others have contended that material is not the primary determinant of quality. Currently, I am personally infatuated with neo retro steel bikes. Bikes with high quality steel frames, carbon forks, and up to date components. I'm currently running a eTap Red drive train on my neo-retro Ritchy Swiss Cross. Here is a good and unbiased discussion of the virtues, and limitations of steel as a frame material from the boys at GCN: 


A
t the end of this video, there are links to GCM's take on carbon, and alu alloy frames. IMHO very good primer on the topic of frame material.
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bwepps

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Reply with quote  #2 
Agreed!

My last 5 or so road bikes have all been carbon including my Diverge Expert.  They are wonderful and light bikes, but after a long day (6 hours+) of gravel the carbon feels a bit harsh.  I bought the new Specialized Sequoia for exactly this reason (and bigger tire clearance).  The Sequoia certainly isn't as light or fast as my Diverge, but it's buttery smooth and compliant.  I'm really enjoying the steel frame, carbon fork, 1x11, and SRAM Force Hydro brakes.  It's a great bike and I'm really enjoying it.  Should be a great tool for the DK200 and some other gravel rides I have scheduled this summer. Spec Sequioa.jpg 

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bobknh

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bwepps
Agreed!

My last 5 or so road bikes have all been carbon including my Diverge Expert.  They are wonderful and light bikes, but after a long day (6 hours+) of gravel the carbon feels a bit harsh.  I bought the new Specialized Sequoia for exactly this reason (and bigger tire clearance).  The Sequoia certainly isn't as light or fast as my Diverge, but it's buttery smooth and compliant.  I'm really enjoying the steel frame, carbon fork, 1x11, and SRAM Force Hydro brakes.  It's a great bike and I'm really enjoying it.  Should be a great tool for the DK200 and some other gravel rides I have scheduled this summer. Spec Sequioa.jpg 

Nice lokin' ride. Very clean and mean. "Horses for courses". Thanks for the post, and good luck at the DK200.
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bobknh

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1eanda
I really like the 2017 Fairdale Weekender Drop. I ordered it and it was delivered to a local bike shop and
the mechanics were really impressed with the build quality. When I picked up the bike several employees were
researching the Fairdale Bikes website and are interested in purchasing from Fairdale. One of the employees
is seriously considering purchasing the Fairdale Goodship Frame set and building a custom bike.

http://fairdalebikes.com/bikes/2017-weekender-drop-bar/

After my Fairdale Weekender Drop was assembled, I added the following:

Brooks C17 Cambium Saddle
Shimano PD-A530 Pedals
Bontrager BackRack Deluxe L
Two Bontrager RL Water Bottle Cages

d5.jpg 

+1 on the Brooks C17. B 17 comfort without the hassle of an all leather saddle. 6 oz. heavier than my old favorite Selle Italia Flite - but worth every ounce.
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chas

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Reply with quote  #5 
I'm enjoying a stiff bike with compliant seat/and seat post, and of course supple tires at the right PSI.  I have a wonderful steel race bike, and while it rides wonderfully, it isn't snappy.  nice for a long day in the saddle, not ideal for a zippy 30 minute romp.

As for carbon, I road a aluminum and a carbon GT Grade.  The compliance of the carbon bike was amazing - it had 28mm tires on it, but felt like it had 2" tires on it.  So cush.  But again, not very zippy...
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bobknh

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Posts: 242
Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chas
I'm enjoying a stiff bike with compliant seat/and seat post, and of course supple tires at the right PSI.  I have a wonderful steel race bike, and while it rides wonderfully, it isn't snappy.  nice for a long day in the saddle, not ideal for a zippy 30 minute romp.

As for carbon, I road a aluminum and a carbon GT Grade.  The compliance of the carbon bike was amazing - it had 28mm tires on it, but felt like it had 2" tires on it.  So cush.  But again, not very zippy...

Thanks for the comments. The subjective "feel" of any bike -- is subjective. And the interaction of the various components can effect this subjective "feel". Tires, tire pressure, frame and fork design, bike fit, saddle ... When I see bikes put to the test in lab's. I'm frequently surprised by the difference between reviewers subjective - but honest -assessments and numbers from the lab. Right now, my favorite ride is steel Ritchey Swiss Cross. But as a past long time road racer and TT specialist, and total weight weenie, in all honesty, I have to say the "best" performing bikes on the planet- ignoring cost- have carbon frames. You will not see a single metal frame in the pro ranks - road, mountain, CX. That being said, I'm no longer racing, and I love the look and feel of my Swiss Cross. My next bike? Probably carbon!
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hipsteronabike

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Reply with quote  #7 

Switching over from my Salsa Casseroll to a DB Haanjo Carbon bike with remarkably similar geometry I think 100% of the difference in feel is negated by switching from 35mm tires to 40mm tires.  The only difference I can feel is the thru-axles.  Tires and geometry will always make a significantly more important difference.

In a similar vein, this is an example of an aluminum bike being compared with a carbon fiber bike for road use. ~"we could feel the bike immediately after switching, but beyond that we noticed nothing).

 

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