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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #76 


Zman,
I haven't tried that many gravel tires actually. Some listed there are mtb tires (Renegade and Fast Track).

I really don't think you can go wrong with the GK's or the Clements. Although, I don't know know if the Clement Tubeless ready tires are available yet. Might be wrong though. Heck, the winner of the DK200 this year rode the GK SK 40's (that have recently been rebranded as 43's).

I chose the Trigger 38 because the team I ride with is sponsored by a Specialized shop and that tire was pretty much designed for 4 time Men's DK winner Dan Hughes and 2 time (?) Women's winner Rebecca Rusch when she rode for Specialized so I figure it would be a solid choice.

I would guess a lot of the Kansas folks ride the Trigger for this reason as well. The 38 Trigger is a totally different tire than the 33. It has a much thicker casing and a slightly raised center section for better rolling. Even with the thicker casing I still got a puncture though (that the Orange Seal sealed and held thankfully).

I think the Sawtooth would have been a better choice though because it's a faster rolling tire and with the dry conditions the extra volume of a 42 would have allowed me to run a tad lower pressure, and perhaps that would have kept me from puncturing. I ran the Trigger because I was worried about mud and the slightly smaller tire with side knobs allowed for more frame clearance. 


https://www.specialized.com/us/en/equipment/components/trigger-pro-2bliss-ready/117895

https://www.cxmagazine.com/specialized-trigger-pro-38c-2bliss-tire-review




You actually mention something that is kind of interesting. Since I am not a local rider I won't have the options of having a dry dirt tire available and a mud tire available. So that being said I guess I should be erring on the side of a multi tire. So I have to figure if the Trigger/Clement mso/Gravel King SK/or Maxis Rambler is the tire that fits that bill. The Clement is tubeless in the 38mm which might be now listed as 40mm.

Zman

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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goneskiian

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Reply with quote  #77 



You actually mention something that is kind of interesting. Since I am not a local rider I won't have the options of having a dry dirt tire available and a mud tire available. So that being said I guess I should be erring on the side of a multi tire. So I have to figure if the Trigger/Clement mso/Gravel King SK/or Maxis Rambler is the tire that fits that bill. The Clement is tubeless in the 38mm which might be now listed as 40mm.

Zman
That's what I did. Picked a happy medium.

I could have brought another set with me though and should have. The shop in town had sealant (I could have brought my own as well) and I'm sure for a small fee they would have helped me switch them out.

There are also some great products out now that would fit in a bike bag or other luggage to make tubeless setup easy like this one from Specialized.

https://www.specialized.com/us/en/equipment/accessories/17pumpfloorair-tool-blast-117288/117288

I've also heard of folks carrying a schrader > presta adapter and stopping at a gas station with an air pump. Which are usually pretty easy to find, even in small towns.

Cheers!

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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #78 
Quote:
Originally Posted by goneskiian



You actually mention something that is kind of interesting. Since I am not a local rider I won't have the options of having a dry dirt tire available and a mud tire available. So that being said I guess I should be erring on the side of a multi tire. So I have to figure if the Trigger/Clement mso/Gravel King SK/or Maxis Rambler is the tire that fits that bill. The Clement is tubeless in the 38mm which might be now listed as 40mm.

Zman
That's what I did. Picked a happy medium.

I could have brought another set with me though and should have. The shop in town had sealant (I could have brought my own as well) and I'm sure for a small fee they would have helped me switch them out.

There are also some great products out now that would fit in a bike bag or other luggage to make tubeless setup easy like this one from Specialized.

https://www.specialized.com/us/en/equipment/accessories/17pumpfloorair-tool-blast-117288/117288

I've also heard of folks carrying a schrader > presta adapter and stopping at a gas station with an air pump. Which are usually pretty easy to find, even in small towns.

Cheers!



Thanks for the info. Are you saying there is a bike shop in Marysville as I was told there wasn't one? I might take an extra set of mud tires with me just in case.

Zman

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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goneskiian

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Reply with quote  #79 
Sorry. I just assumed there would be a bike shop in town. Obviously Emporia (home of the DK) is a bit bigger with more services than Marysville. 
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sgtrobo

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Reply with quote  #80 

so a few folks asked about the base level Sequoia and the Sawtooths.  i have the base-level Sequoia frame, but built up with a different fork and wheelset (The base Sequoia's fork and wheelset are both boat anchors)

Sequoia's weight (54cm) with Thompson stem, 34t oval crank, Whiskey 9 fork, and I9 Trail 245 wheelset is a bit over 22lbs (almost 10kg on the dot).

 

the Sawtooths are heavy, but they roll so ridiculously fast, and are so puncture-resistant and wide, and set up tubeless so easily, that to me the little bit of extra weight is worth it. They are super fast on gravel and pavement, but not really good for cornering or in the soft/mud (big surprise there)

 

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tacobellbiker

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Reply with quote  #81 
The Sequoia is a bit heavy in stock config, especially the wheels as the poster above mentions. My 54cm was 24lbs stock.
Sawtooths are about 615g which isn't bad for a 42mm tire with puncture protection. 
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chas

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Reply with quote  #82 
yeah, not bad.  But my Maxxis Ramblers provide 1lb less rotational weigh, which is huge.  Although, if you are not climbing or accelerating hard - the weight may not make much difference.  
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GrvlRob

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Reply with quote  #83 
I just noticed on the Specialized website that in addition to 700x42 the Sawtooth tire is now avaliable in 700x38.

Has anyone out there tried the new size yet?

Looks like around a 1/2 lb. savings. May order up a set for my wife’s RLT 9
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murphster

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Reply with quote  #84 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurichman


Zman,
I haven't tried that many gravel tires actually. Some listed there are mtb tires (Renegade and Fast Track).

I really don't think you can go wrong with the GK's or the Clements. Although, I don't know know if the Clement Tubeless ready tires are available yet. Might be wrong though. Heck, the winner of the DK200 this year rode the GK SK 40's (that have recently been rebranded as 43's).

I chose the Trigger 38 because the team I ride with is sponsored by a Specialized shop and that tire was pretty much designed for 4 time Men's DK winner Dan Hughes and 2 time (?) Women's winner Rebecca Rusch when she rode for Specialized so I figure it would be a solid choice.

I would guess a lot of the Kansas folks ride the Trigger for this reason as well. The 38 Trigger is a totally different tire than the 33. It has a much thicker casing and a slightly raised center section for better rolling. Even with the thicker casing I still got a puncture though (that the Orange Seal sealed and held thankfully).

I think the Sawtooth would have been a better choice though because it's a faster rolling tire and with the dry conditions the extra volume of a 42 would have allowed me to run a tad lower pressure, and perhaps that would have kept me from puncturing. I ran the Trigger because I was worried about mud and the slightly smaller tire with side knobs allowed for more frame clearance. 


https://www.specialized.com/us/en/equipment/components/trigger-pro-2bliss-ready/117895

https://www.cxmagazine.com/specialized-trigger-pro-38c-2bliss-tire-review




You actually mention something that is kind of interesting. Since I am not a local rider I won't have the options of having a dry dirt tire available and a mud tire available. So that being said I guess I should be erring on the side of a multi tire. So I have to figure if the Trigger/Clement mso/Gravel King SK/or Maxis Rambler is the tire that fits that bill. The Clement is tubeless in the 38mm which might be now listed as 40mm.

Zman

I'm riding the 38 Trigger pro that came on my Diverge Expert.  I'm considering the Sawtooth 42 when these wear out.  My riding is 80% pavement (this is also my road bike), and 20% dirt (soft over hard, sandy SoCal trails).  Do you think the Sawtooth would be better than the Triggers?  Any other tire suggestions.  I favor comfort/handling over speed. Thanks!
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #85 
Quote:
Originally Posted by murphster


You actually mention something that is kind of interesting. Since I am not a local rider I won't have the options of having a dry dirt tire available and a mud tire available. So that being said I guess I should be erring on the side of a multi tire. So I have to figure if the Trigger/Clement mso/Gravel King SK/or Maxis Rambler is the tire that fits that bill. The Clement is tubeless in the 38mm which might be now listed as 40mm.

Zman


I'm riding the 38 Trigger pro that came on my Diverge Expert.  I'm considering the Sawtooth 42 when these wear out.  My riding is 80% pavement (this is also my road bike), and 20% dirt (soft over hard, sandy SoCal trails).  Do you think the Sawtooth would be better than the Triggers?  Any other tire suggestions.  I favor comfort/handling over speed. Thanks!


murphster I am not the tire expert on here yet as I have only been gravel bike riding/racing for a year and have only tried Clement(now Donnley) xplor mso in 700 x 40 and Kenda Flintridge Pros in 700 x 40. I like the Flintridge over the Clements. I have heard good things about the Schwalbe G Ones and Gravel Kings SK. Chase and many other posters on here have tried more tires than I have. Maybe start your own post to get some answers. I need to get a lot more miles on my bike to wear a couple set of tires out. I probably would stick with 700 x 40 tires though.

Zman



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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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GrvlRob

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Reply with quote  #86 
I was so impressed by The Sawtooth 38mm’s which I installed on my wife’s RLT9 I purchased a second pair and put them on my Sequoia too!

As compared to the 42 Sawtooths they are lighter, roll faster and other than being slightly less comfortable rollling over rocks on single track, they work better overall for the terrain I ride on, which is about 80% paved.
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Koyote

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Reply with quote  #87 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrvlRob
I was so impressed by The Sawtooth 38mm’s which I installed on my wife’s RLT9 I purchased a second pair and put them on my Sequoia too!

As compared to the 42 Sawtooths they are lighter, roll faster and other than being slightly less comfortable rollling over rocks on single track, they work better overall for the terrain I ride on, which is about 80% paved.


Rob, can you tell us how the Sawtooths compare to other tires? 
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GrvlRob

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Reply with quote  #88 
I am a huge fan of the Sawtooth tire in both sizes, 42 & 38 because of the way that it rolls fast and carves corners on pavement yet is also secure on dirt & gravel.

I can ride the Sequoia like a road bike and maintain road bike speeds with the pack yet also be off road ready in case trails are involved.

I think the size 38 is the “sweet spot” in terms of size & weight. I am currently rolling 38mm on a set of Stan’s Arch ZTR wheels and 42’s on my stock Hayfield wheel set.

I have tried 700x40 nano’s, 700x28 GP4000’s & 700x32 Nobby Nics for comparison and am now sticking with Sawtooths.

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Koyote

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Reply with quote  #89 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrvlRob
I am a huge fan of the Sawtooth tire in both sizes, 42 & 38 because of the way that it rolls fast and carves corners on pavement yet is also secure on dirt & gravel.

I can ride the Sequoia like a road bike and maintain road bike speeds with the pack yet also be off road ready in case trails are involved.

I think the size 38 is the “sweet spot” in terms of size & weight. I am currently rolling 38mm on a set of Stan’s Arch mk3 wheels and 42’s on my stock Hayfield wheel set.

I have tried 700x40 nano’s, 700x28 GP4000’s & 700x32 Nobby Nics for comparison and am now sticking with Sawtooths.


Thanks, Rob, I appreciate the perspective!  

My Sawtooth 38s are the first tubeless tires I've tried, and I'm happy with them, but have no frame for comparison. They are getting pretty worn, and I am trying to decide whether to buy another pair or switch to something with more tread like the Terrene Elwood. I have a couple big gravel races this fall that will include lots of out-of-the-saddle climbing, and I am wondering if the Sawtooth tires will provide enough traction to keep the rear from breaking loose.
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bwepps

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Reply with quote  #90 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koyote


Thanks, Rob, I appreciate the perspective!  

My Sawtooth 38s are the first tubeless tires I've tried, and I'm happy with them, but have no frame for comparison. They are getting pretty worn, and I am trying to decide whether to buy another pair or switch to something with more tread like the Terrene Elwood. I have a couple big gravel races this fall that will include lots of out-of-the-saddle climbing, and I am wondering if the Sawtooth tires will provide enough traction to keep the rear from breaking loose.


I'd encourage you to look at the Panaracer Gravel King SK's in a 700x38.  They are easy to setup tubeless, have a decent tread, and are lighter than the Sawtooths.  I rode them for the 2017 DK200 and they handled the very sharp and sketchy flintrock gravel well.  Calling parts of the DK200 "gravel" is a stretch as there are some really hairy B-roads that are covered with big chunky rocks.
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Koyote

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Reply with quote  #91 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bwepps


I'd encourage you to look at the Panaracer Gravel King SK's in a 700x38.  They are easy to setup tubeless, have a decent tread, and are lighter than the Sawtooths.  I rode them for the 2017 DK200 and they handled the very sharp and sketchy flintrock gravel well.  Calling parts of the DK200 "gravel" is a stretch as there are some really hairy B-roads that are covered with big chunky rocks.


Thanks for the recommendations.

I've read that those tires kick up a lot of gravel...Has that been your experience? I mean, like gravel that ends up in a riders helmet or jersey pockets. [eek]
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stud.beefpile

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Reply with quote  #92 
They only pick up the kitty-litter sized gravel.  I've run a pair of the 40's (now 43's), and they sling a little bit of it, but nothing that other nearby riders don't also sling.
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goneskiian

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Reply with quote  #93 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Koyote


Thanks for the recommendations.

I've read that those tires kick up a lot of gravel...Has that been your experience? I mean, like gravel that ends up in a riders helmet or jersey pockets. [eek]

They don't call them "gravel flingers" for nothing! They absolutely do. So do some other tires too, but not as much as those. I spent most of the 2017 Gravel Worlds in a group with someone that had those on and had so much gravel in my hair, pockets, and even down in my jersey (shoulda kept it zipped all the way up!) that I was shocked. When I was on their wheel I was literally leaning my head to the side like it was wet out, trying to keep the spray of gravel out of my face. 

I am liking the Sawtooth tires as well. They do roll quite nice for how heavy their carcass is. I haven't spent much time on the 38's though as I just got a set that came on a Diverge I got for my wife for her Bday and haven't seen them for sale separately at my LBS.

I had planned on running the 42's at the DK200 this year but went with the backup Trigger 38's for max mud clearance when the T-storms rolled through just before the start. 

Cheers!

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Koyote

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Reply with quote  #94 
Thanks for the input, everyone! I appreciate all of the info, and would appreciate any other comments, too.

Still not sure what I am going to do...Have another month before I have to decide.

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chas

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Reply with quote  #95 
There are lots of good tires to choose from, and for most people they will be pretty similar.  I have specialized trigger (smooth center with side knobs), Maxis Rambler, and Schwalbe G-One.

I like the Ramlber (38 and 40) as they are light and fast.  They handle pretty similar to the heavier G-One  The GK SK sounds like it is a little slower, heavier, and tougher - good for chunky flinty rides.   If its really rough or sandy, I'll put a 50mm+ tire on the front.  If it is hard and smooth (typical for this time of year around here), I'll use smooth 32mm tires to save weight (although I'll have to be careful on fast loose corners).  
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #96 
Quote:
Originally Posted by goneskiian

 

They don't call them "gravel flingers" for nothing! They absolutely do. So do some other tires too, but not as much as those. I spent most of the 2017 Gravel Worlds in a group with someone that had those on and had so much gravel in my hair, pockets, and even down in my jersey (shoulda kept it zipped all the way up!) that I was shocked. When I was on their wheel I was literally leaning my head to the side like it was wet out, trying to keep the spray of gravel out of my face. 

I am liking the Sawtooth tires as well. They do roll quite nice for how heavy their carcass is. I haven't spent much time on the 38's though as I just got a set that came on a Diverge I got for my wife for her Bday and haven't seen them for sale separately at my LBS.

I had planned on running the 42's at the DK200 this year but went with the backup Trigger 38's for max mud clearance when the T-storms rolled through just before the start. 

Cheers!



goneskiian I have lots to learn about tires yet as I have only tried the Clement(now Donnley) xplor MSO IN 700 X 40 and then at the Pony Express Express 75 miler last year I ran the Kenda Flintridge Pro's in 700 x 40 and like them but they seem slower than the Donnley's. Are you saying that the Trigger 38's are the best mud tires you have found? I have thoughts probably get er dun over the winter of getting another set of wheels built up so I can have a race set of wheels and then a set up for a mud course. I also did a night ride on the Roker Comp Sunday night and did see that the Donnley's was throwing off some fine stones. With a carbon bike and seeing that the paint scratches easily on my Roker Comp I doubt that I will ever run the Gravel Kings SK if they sling stones like ever body says.

Any thoughts/help/suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Zman

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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