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El Train

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Reply with quote  #26 
Can someone get a real width measurement on these with their rim width also? Very curious but i have a frame that may or may not fit them depending on the actual size. Thanks
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tacobellbiker

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Reply with quote  #27 
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Train
Can someone get a real width measurement on these with their rim width also? Very curious but i have a frame that may or may not fit them depending on the actual size. Thanks


Mine measure 42mm exactly. My rims are 26mm wide internally.
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RoverAl

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Reply with quote  #28 
1.75 in with 21mm IW@40 PSI >300 miles
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Aqsurf

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Reply with quote  #29 
Hey All,

I have had a Sequoia Elite since around Thanksgiving of 2016 and I am loving it.  I also love the versatility and speed of the Sawtooth tires, but I am about to purchase my 5th(!!) tire in 7 months! I have put about 1600 miles on the bike in mixed terrain, running the tires tubeless, and at around 55-60 psi on the road, and 35-40 psi on the trails.  I am a big guy, 6'5" 245, and I usually carry three water bottles, at least, so the bike and tires are doing a lot of work.  When I run any lower they feel too squishy and I can't go fast enough.

I have had 6 punctures, 3 of them fatal, to the Sawtooths.  All have been on road conditions, not trail.  Glass mostly, and yesterday I hit something metal on the highway that sliced the sidewall and completely blew out the tire, instantaneously.  Do I just have bad luck, bad vision for sharp bits on the road, am I running them too high pressure?  I've had more punctures than I did over several years of riding skinny tires, but maybe I have been lulled into a false sense of security, and I am not vigilant about looking for little pointy things.

In any event, I cannot say these are durable.  My first rear tire was worn down after about 900 miles.  I do love them, and I am probably going to buy another one today, but only because I am too impatient and lazy to research what is better.
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RoverAl

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Reply with quote  #30 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aqsurf
 Hey All,

I have had a Sequoia Elite since around Thanksgiving of 2016 and I am loving it.  I also love the versatility and speed of the Sawtooth tires, but I am about to purchase my 5th(!!) tire in 7 months! I have put about 1600 miles on the bike in mixed terrain, running the tires tubeless, and at around 55-60 psi on the road, and 35-40 psi on the trails.  I am a big guy, 6'5" 245, and I usually carry three water bottles, at least, so the bike and tires are doing a lot of work.  When I run any lower they feel too squishy and I can't go fast enough.

I have had 6 punctures, 3 of them fatal, to the Sawtooths.  All have been on road conditions, not trail.  Glass mostly, and yesterday I hit something metal on the highway that sliced the sidewall and completely blew out the tire, instantaneously.  Do I just have bad luck, bad vision for sharp bits on the road, am I running them too high pressure?  I've had more punctures than I did over several years of riding skinny tires, but maybe I have been lulled into a false sense of security, and I am not vigilant about looking for little pointy things.

In any event, I cannot say these are durable.  My first rear tire was worn down after about 900 miles.  I do love them, and I am probably going to buy another one today, but only because I am too impatient and lazy to research what is better.



Thanks for your report. That is nerve wracking getting that many flats. I would email Specialized and ask them for advice. Tires have production codes on them and maybe you got a bad batch, but 5 times is unusual. Something is going on there.
I have around 500 miles on them and have been lucky "no issues" so far and not showing any wear at all on either tire. I was just reading about someone getting 6000 miles on a set. I run about the same pressures with 50 55 psi being my baseline. Excluding bike my ride weight is usually around 225-230 lbs.

I would buy from a different dealer, contact Specialized and see what they say.

I am thinking about a 61 cm base model as a potential next bike. DO you find the fit to be ok, Im 6'1"
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #31 
RoverAl I have a tire question since this seems to be a tire discussion thread here. Being the newbie to gravel grinding I really don't know what to expect out of tires. I also don't have much to compare to either as is. my only other mt. bike was an el cheapo just above a Wally World Schwinn highlander heavy than a rock bike that had aggressive knobby tires on it. So far I think I am liking the Clement x'plor M50 40X700C tires that came stock on my Raleigh Tamland 1 bike. I am at 200 lbs and so max weight on my bike would probably be 210 with everything. I am trying to find a good tire pressure to run at with tubes. I am still coming from the road riding end and am use to tires pumped up. I started out the ride the other day and the tires felt too soft so I turned around and came back and pumped the tires up 60 in the rear and 50 up front I believe. I then went and rode my local mt. which was hard packed washboard/rutted mountain road that is hard packed limestone/sandstone. The tires seemed too hard and harsh of a ride. Any suggestions of a starting point for me with psi? The other thing is I guess I would consider myself a decent climber. I switched out the gearing to the sram 12x36 with the road link. I am happy with the gearing now for climbing. I am not so happy on the braking on the downhills. It seems that all I was doing on the 3 mile descent that was at 7-8% slope was grabbing brake. What would be a decent upgrade for better braking on the Raleigh Tamland 1, how much would it cost and how much weight would it gain or decrease on my bike. Or should I just get use to learning better bike handling skills? If I was in techy off road downhill (maybe single track) riding right now I don't think I would be very comfortable.

Thanks
Zman

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RoverAl

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Reply with quote  #32 
Quote:
Originally Posted by zman
 RoverAl I have a tire question since this seems to be a tire discussion thread here. Being the newbie to gravel grinding I really don't know what to expect out of tires. I also don't have much to compare to either as is. my only other mt. bike was an el cheapo just above a Wally World Schwinn highlander heavy than a rock bike that had aggressive knobby tires on it. So far I think I am liking the Clement x'plor M50 40X700C tires that came stock on my Raleigh Tamland 1 bike. I am at 200 lbs and so max weight on my bike would probably be 210 with everything. I am trying to find a good tire pressure to run at with tubes. I am still coming from the road riding end and am use to tires pumped up. I started out the ride the other day and the tires felt too soft so I turned around and came back and pumped the tires up 60 in the rear and 50 up front I believe. I then went and rode my local mt. which was hard packed washboard/rutted mountain road that is hard packed limestone/sandstone. The tires seemed too hard and harsh of a ride. Any suggestions of a starting point for me with psi? The other thing is I guess I would consider myself a decent climber. I switched out the gearing to the sram 12x36 with the road link. I am happy with the gearing now for climbing. I am not so happy on the braking on the downhills. It seems that all I was doing on the 3 mile descent that was at 7-8% slope was grabbing brake. What would be a decent upgrade for better braking on the Raleigh Tamland 1, how much would it cost and how much weight would it gain or decrease on my bike. Or should I just get use to learning better bike handling skills? If I was in techy off road downhill (maybe single track) riding right now I don't think I would be very comfortable.




I actually like the tubed Clement 40MSO's  better than the Tubeless Clement 36's,
I switched to tubeless awhile ago and don't remember my running pressures tubed.
I usually start out at the halfway pressure range recommended on the tire and then just go by feel from there. Taking a portable pump along is helpful to get things dialed in that's what I do. After awhile I just got a feel for what is right. On the road I would go higher pressure and if I hit enough gravel I will let out some air, a one second burst is about 5psi. I usuall keep the front about 5psi lower than rear, that works for me and sometimes the same just because lol!

You need to find your own PSI because of the many variables involved. What works for me won't work for you.
I ride for fun just screwing around and enjoying my bike time just watching the world go by. I like to go fast sometimes and cruise slow. I would like to participate in an event but sadly Fla does not host many near my travel range.

About brakes: I have had crappy Hayes entry level brakes on my first gravel bike and now have very good TRP Spyres on my Raleigh Willard.  I learned both brakes inside and out and am able to repair replace or adjust as needed. By learning the brakes I was able to get every ounce of performance out of them.  I pull the pads periodically and deglaze, readjust when needed and according to my preferences at the levers. Adjustment is important especially during the break in period.

There are aftermarket pads out there  that can help with performance as well. Look around on the forum  there is lots of good info out there. Me I'm still on my first set of pads at 3000 miles. 


Where I ride there are no major descents or 7% grades it is mostly flat with occasional hills, great for older guys like me. I don't know what would make you a better downhiller.


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Aqsurf

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Reply with quote  #33 
Hey RoverAl,

I love the Sequoia.  It is a funny geometry. I went from a 64cm TREK to this 61 cm Sequoia, and it seems fine.  At 6'5" I have a LOT of seatpost showing, but everyone will due to the sloping top tube.  I had to get a Thomson Elite setback 410mm post to get in the right spot.  The stock stem is a little shallow angled and long for me given that I had to set the saddle back a bit. The bike has changed everything for me.  I had a road bike, a commuter bike, and a mountain bike.  Got rid of them all, and now I only have one bike, the Sequoia.  I do 70+ mile road rides, tow the kids to school in a trailer, ride the local trails and fire roads, whatever.

I'd like to do some randonneuring and bikepacking, but the only thing holding me up is the carbon fork.  It scares me to put too much weight on it.
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chas

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Reply with quote  #34 
The only thing that should worry you about the carbon fork is hitting it with a sharp object (carbon doesn't like "point loading"), or drilling holes into it.  Carbon is very strong as long as you don't use it for something it wasn't intended for.

I do like to have a fair bit of seat post showing.  It allows for some flex and absorption in the seat post.  I have a Specialized CG-R seatpost with some elastomer in it that makes an aluminum bike ride like a carbon bike, and a thudbuster ST (with a leather brooks) that I will use for very long and rough rides.  You do need a fair amount of seat post showing for any seat post to work properly in providing some absorption...
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chas

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Reply with quote  #35 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurichman
...I am trying to find a good tire pressure to run at with tubes. I am still coming from the road riding end and am use to tires pumped up. I started out the ride the other day and the tires felt too soft so I turned around and came back and pumped the tires up 60 in the rear and 50 up front I believe. I then went and rode my local mt. which was hard packed washboard/rutted mountain road that is hard packed limestone/sandstone. The tires seemed too hard and harsh of a ride. Any suggestions of a starting point for me with psi? 

Thanks
Zman


Zman

for 200lbs and 40mm, one popular gravel site's reader's survey recommend:

35-40 gravel
45-55 road

you could also do a web search for bicycle quarterly tire drop pressure to see a graph of recommended pressure by tire size and weight. That chart tends to have very low pressures on it.

Those pressures seem a little low for me for tubed tires, as I would worry about pinch flats.  
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DarKris

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Reply with quote  #36 
Wanted to update this tread because (finally) Specialized now has the 650b version of the Sawtooth available for purchase on their site. No word on the weight but I am really interested based on the price. I've been running Vee Tire Speedsters 27.5x1.75 and apparently they weigh ~580g and they always feel sluggish to me even though they have lower RR than my 2" Panaracer Comets.

I digress, but it will be interesting to see another option in the "Road Plus" category.
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RoverAl

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Reply with quote  #37 
Quote:
Specialized now has the 650b version of the Sawtooth available for purchase on their site.  


That's good to see, I would like to see them offer a 38c size too for riders with limited clearance. 

I am still enjoying my set, they are my current favorite all around tire. The only con I can think of is sustained speeds over 18 mph takes a little more effort than my 32c tires and for me I just cant hang at that speed.
I am going to keep them on for the rest of summer here in Fla. I usually switch to a lighter skinnier tire for the dog days but I really like riding on these.

Thanks for the comments about the Sequoia 
Quote:
At 6'5" I have a LOT of seatpost showing, but everyone will due to the sloping top tube.   

This is something I simply don't like for personal reasons purely, maybe if I ride one I would change my mindset about it.
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tacobellbiker

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Reply with quote  #38 
Got 1300 miles now on my Sawtooths and they are holding up well. No punctures yet (knock on wood). Just went on a week-long bikepacking trip and they handled well on pavement, dirt, gravel, grass, and singletrack.

Dialed in my pressures now at 27 psi front and 30 psi rear. They feel supple and grip fantastically.

In terms of tread wear, there is a small amount. I rotated the front and rear tires at 700 miles so the wear is about even. It looks like this pair will last at least 3000-4000 miles.

I've actually gotten to appreciate having a bit more rolling momentum than my 28mm road bike. It's a nice feeling when touring, and actually all my Strava records along the local park where I ride daily are on the Sequoia with the 42mm Sawtooths and not on the carbon roadie with 28mm tires!


20170604_190004.jpg  20170606_163237.jpg  20170607_124022.jpg 

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RoverAl

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Reply with quote  #39 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tacobellbiker
Got 1300 miles now on my Sawtooths and they are holding up well. No punctures yet (knock on wood). Just went on a week-long bikepacking trip and they handled well on pavement, dirt, gravel, grass, and singletrack.

Dialed in my pressures now at 27 psi front and 30 psi rear. They feel supple and grip fantastically.

In terms of tread wear, there is a small amount. I rotated the front and rear tires at 700 miles so the wear is about even. It looks like this pair will last at least 3000-4000 miles.

  20170607_124022.jpg


Thanks for the pics,tall grass drains my energy but it's fun to ride thru. Sometimes I ride grass for the extra workout. Your seat post looks pretty normal to me what size is your bike?
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #40 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tacobellbiker
Got 1300 miles now on my Sawtooths and they are holding up well. No punctures yet (knock on wood). Just went on a week-long bikepacking trip and they handled well on pavement, dirt, gravel, grass, and singletrack.

Dialed in my pressures now at 27 psi front and 30 psi rear. They feel supple and grip fantastically.

In terms of tread wear, there is a small amount. I rotated the front and rear tires at 700 miles so the wear is about even. It looks like this pair will last at least 3000-4000 miles.

I've actually gotten to appreciate having a bit more rolling momentum than my 28mm road bike. It's a nice feeling when touring, and actually all my Strava records along the local park where I ride daily are on the Sequoia with the 42mm Sawtooths and not on the carbon roadie with 28mm tires!


20170604_190004.jpg  20170606_163237.jpg  20170607_124022.jpg 



What bag is that on the back of your bike?

Thanks
Zman

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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tacobellbiker

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Reply with quote  #41 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoverAl


Thanks for the pics,tall grass drains my energy but it's fun to ride thru. Sometimes I ride grass for the extra workout. Your seat post looks pretty normal to me what size is your bike?


It's a size 54, I'm 5'8".
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tacobellbiker

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Reply with quote  #42 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurichman



What bag is that on the back of your bike?

Thanks
Zman


That's a Lone Peak expedition saddlebag. 
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #43 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tacobellbiker


That's a Lone Peak expedition saddlebag. 


Thanks that looks like a great bag for bike camping. How does it mount?


Zman

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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Aqsurf

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Reply with quote  #44 
Looks like a fun set up, tacobellbiker!  


For the record, I do love the Sawtooths, otherwise I wouldn't keep buying them.  I think I just have bad luck/aim when it comes to sharp objects on the roads.  

The Sawtooths are fast, and so is the Sequoia.  As a big guy, the bike handles my weight and power amazingly well.  The combo of Sequoia and Sawtooths has opened a whole new world of cycling to me.  One without boundaries, where I feel like I am on, or at least capable of diverting onto, an adventure on nearly every ride, so long as I have the right bags and H2O capacity mounted that day.

On this day, I did not!  Next time!

IMG_2016.JPG.jpeg

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tacobellbiker

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Reply with quote  #45 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurichman


Thanks that looks like a great bag for bike camping. How does it mount?


Zman


It attaches at the saddle rails and at the seatpost. I added a third attachment point with a shoelace around the top of the seatpost. 

It doubles as a decent mudguard.
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tacobellbiker

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Reply with quote  #46 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aqsurf
Looks like a fun set up, tacobellbiker!  


For the record, I do love the Sawtooths, otherwise I wouldn't keep buying them.  I think I just have bad luck/aim when it comes to sharp objects on the roads.  

The Sawtooths are fast, and so is the Sequoia.  As a big guy, the bike handles my weight and power amazingly well.  The combo of Sequoia and Sawtooths has opened a whole new world of cycling to me.  One without boundaries, where I feel like I am on, or at least capable of diverting onto, an adventure on nearly every ride, so long as I have the right bags and H2O capacity mounted that day.

On this day, I did not!  Next time!

IMG_2016.JPG.jpeg



All that seatpost must give a nice plush ride in the rear. I would expose more seatpost but my legs are not long enough.

Looks like you've got the third cage mounted on the bottom, have you tried mounting bottles cages to the fork? I was a bit skeptical at first with it being carbon, but those mounts are rated for 5kg on each side, and the bike handles great with a pair of 1L bottles on the fork.
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Aqsurf

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Reply with quote  #47 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tacobellbiker



All that seatpost must give a nice plush ride in the rear. I would expose more seatpost but my legs are not long enough.

Looks like you've got the third cage mounted on the bottom, have you tried mounting bottles cages to the fork? I was a bit skeptical at first with it being carbon, but those mounts are rated for 5kg on each side, and the bike handles great with a pair of 1L bottles on the fork.


It is a super comfy ride. That's the Thomson Elite setback lost, extra long, 410mm I think.

I have two anything cages that I mount on the fork, yeah, it's great. I put two 42 oz Kleen Kanteens up there in addition to the three bottle cages. I need a lot of water on some of these SoCal gravel rides.

I also have the Specialized Pizza Rack that mounts on the front. 22 lb max load on the fork mean I can put a 12 pack of beer, or camping gear, or groceries, or whatever on the rack.

I use this bike for everything :-)

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RoverAl

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Reply with quote  #48 
Cool pics aqsurf! Did the Burley hook up easily?
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Aqsurf

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Reply with quote  #49 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoverAl
Cool pics aqsurf! Did the Burley hook up easily?


I just swap out the thru axle w/ a The Robert Axle Project thru axle for hitch mount trailers.
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #50 
Roveral could you possibly post while you like the Clement 40 cm tubed tires over the 36 cm MSO tubeless tires. I am so new to that I am getting way confused.

Thanks
Zman

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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