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ljsmith

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Reply with quote  #1 
I've got a Lynskey GR250 and I use 29 x 2.0 Furious Freds to ride Gravel and Singletrack.  I wanted to get some faster, more nimble tires for road and smooth crushed limestone trails.  I saw Schwalbe just came out with a 650b x 2.0 G-One Speed which looked perfect.  I'll tell you up front that I am a big fan of Schwalbe tires on my mountain bikes because they are usually lighter with much lower rolling resistance than almost any other tires out there.  I just mounted them up to some 19mm internal width Crossmax wheels.  It will be a few days before I can ride them, but thought I would just post up some specs.  The casing is the mountain bike snakeskin casing (not the microskin like the narrower versions of the G-One), but it uses the extremely low rolling resistance One Star compound.  I get all my Schwalbes from Germany since they are so much cheaper, even after paying for overseas shipping.  They cost $120 for both shipped.  Schwalbe claims they are 500g, mine weigh 532g.  This is not too far off.  What is a little dissapointing is that they only measure out to 47mm (1.85") on my rims.  The GR250 can fit 2.1 tires pretty easy, so I was hoping for a little more volume.  Though to be honest, this makes them a better tire for gravel bikes since a lot of gravel bikes these days are designed around 47mm tires.  

G One 1.jpg 
G One 2.jpg 
G One 3.jpg 

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bobknh

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Reply with quote  #2 
Thanks for the post. I met a pro mechanic on a bike tour in Tuscany in Sept. We got to talking about tire tech. He was very high on Schwalbe - even though he worked for Specialized. That of course proves nothing; but I've been upgrading my wheels toe Schwalbe tubeless rubber. My first experiment was the 28mm Schwalbe Pro-one tubelese. So far, a few hundred miles on pavement, with a little hard pack thrown in, they've lived up to the hype. Schwalbe recommends a  minimum pressure of 60 PSI, but I've been running mine at 55/50 psi without issue on paved roads. I also purchased Shwalbe's 38mm G-Ones for gravel; but I wont get to test them until next Spring. I hope they live up to the positive reviews I've read. I'll be giving them a good workout next year during the NH "mud" season in April. BTW, the Pro-Ones mounted tubeless very easily on my DT Swiss 411 rims. Did use my compressor, though to seat them. After deflating them to install sealant, the inflated easily with a floor pump. You can actually run these puppies without sealant -- but not a good idea IMHO.
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tacobellbiker

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Reply with quote  #3 
I noticed as well the new G-One sizes and picked up a pair of 29x2.0 (700x50) G-One Speed tires for my gravel bike. They weigh in at 524g and 548g on my scale (official is 520g). Mounted on a 26mm internal width rim, they measure 50mm and 51mm wide respectively. I put the slightly wider one in front. Still dialing in the tire pressure but right now I'm at 25psi rear and 22psi front, for 140lbs rider weight. 

Initial impression is soft and plush but still sensitive to road feel. Tactile sensation on tarmac is pleasant, not common for any tire with tread. Haven't had a chance to do any off-road riding on these tires yet, except if you count snow/ice as off-road. They did handle snow admirably and ice not at all, but that is to be expected for essentially a bald tire.

20171209_092831.jpg  2.jpg  20171209_120642.jpg  _1.jpg  20171209_120547.jpg   

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chas

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Reply with quote  #4 
Yeah, I'm slowly migrating from Contenental to Schwalbe because Schwalbe has some great gravel tires and embrace tubless.

I have the 650b 60mm speed.  I was shocked when I put them on the bike because at 15mph (i.e. gravel speed) they are as easy to pedal hard core race bikes (~10 watts per tire).  It was so strange riding a mountain bike with so little effort.

Just took them on a nice 45 mile night ride.  So super cush, and easy to ride on smooth or rough surfaces.  I did some personal bests on a rail trail.  Frighteningly horrible in mud or wet grass.  I'm thinking the size hurts a lot in mud, as the 38mm version just digs down and cuts through with some care.  Flotation + mud isn't a good combination.

I got some 38mm all arounds for my gravel bike.  Super nice rolling, but not quite as grippy or light as my Maxxis Ramblers.  Super smooth though!  Next up, I'll probably get the 30mm speed for those summer days where I feel the need for speed.
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ljsmith

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Reply with quote  #5 
In an attempt to get more volume out of the tires, I pumped them up to 60psi and left them for the last couple days.  They grew to 49mm, but of course that is at 60psi.  Once I lowered the pressure to 30 psi, they went down to 47.5mm.  So they did stretch a little.  I took them out for my typical after work ride hitting differing types of terrrain.  The tires ride exactly as I'd expect.  The are very, very fast on pavement and smooth, packed gravel.  On thick loose gravel they bounce and slip around, but really no worse than my 700x38mm G-One allrounds.  They are useless in mud, they are basically a dry conditions only tire.  They were slightly faster on the road than my Furious Freds, but slightly slower on the gravel.  Overall they are a great dry conditions gravel tire if you are looking to go fast.  I did like that the smaller diameter tires steered faster and just made the bike feel more nimble overall compared to the Furious Freds.
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tacobellbiker

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Reply with quote  #6 
Have you tried using a wheel with a wider rim? I switched the tires to my Derby wheels with 30mm internal width, and they measure 55mm and 56mm wide. So far, I prefer the way the wider rims feel with the G-One Speed compared to the narrower 26mm ones. The difference is most noticeable in the corners.

The tread itself doesn't get any wider, and I know ENVE and Mavic say 30 is too wide for a 2.0 tire, but my hands-on feeling is that the wider rim feels better and less squirmy. I can run 4 PSI less with the wider rims and keep the same feel on pavement, but with better performance off-road. I almost wonder what will happen with an even bigger rim. At some point I imagine there will be a point of diminishing returns or reversal.
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ljsmith

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tacobellbiker
Have you tried using a wheel with a wider rim? I switched the tires to my Derby wheels with 30mm internal width, and they measure 55mm and 56mm wide. So far, I prefer the way the wider rims feel with the G-One Speed compared to the narrower 26mm ones. The difference is most noticeable in the corners.

The tread itself doesn't get any wider, and I know ENVE and Mavic say 30 is too wide for a 2.0 tire, but my hands-on feeling is that the wider rim feels better and less squirmy. I can run 4 PSI less with the wider rims and keep the same feel on pavement, but with better performance off-road. I almost wonder what will happen with an even bigger rim. At some point I imagine there will be a point of diminishing returns or reversal.


First off, you shouldn't have to put a 2.0 tire on a really wide rim just to get it to be a 2.0.  Second, 30mm is just too wide a rim for a 2.0 tire, not only is the tire not designed for that width, but its shape is not going to give good handling.  In my opinion this whole wide rim thing is out of control.  On cars, a lot of import customizers run wide rims with narrower tires.  Its called "tire stretching".  If you have this done at a tire shop they make you sign a waiver so they aren't liable for any issues you have from running too narrow a tire on a wide rim.  But for some reason everyone in the biking world thinks that you can run a 23m tire on a fat bike rim now and its so awesome because it increases the tire volume.  Theres a lot more to how a tire rides than volume.
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tacobellbiker

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljsmith


First off, you shouldn't have to put a 2.0 tire on a really wide rim just to get it to be a 2.0.  Second, 30mm is just too wide a rim for a 2.0 tire, not only is the tire not designed for that width, but its shape is not going to give good handling.  In my opinion this whole wide rim thing is out of control.  On cars, a lot of import customizers run wide rims with narrower tires.  Its called "tire stretching".  If you have this done at a tire shop they make you sign a waiver so they aren't liable for any issues you have from running too narrow a tire on a wide rim.  But for some reason everyone in the biking world thinks that you can run a 23m tire on a fat bike rim now and its so awesome because it increases the tire volume.  Theres a lot more to how a tire rides than volume.


I can only go by my personal experience running these on two sets of rims over the past week. I prefer the wider rims, and actually am faster on them as well according to Strava (mostly the cornering probably). I agree with you that you shouldn't have to put a 2.0 tire on a super wide rim to be a 2.0, but maybe 19mm is a bit on the narrow side? Perhaps a 23mm might be a good compromise.
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Volsung

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Reply with quote  #9 
I've run 2.15 Schwalbes on 47mm rims on my cargo bike for the past thousand or do miles with no issues whatsoever, and that includes curb hopping weighed down with Home Depot stuff.

30mm is fine. 19 is fine too. I think people over think rim width, especially since most of us aren't chasing a podium spot.
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