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NoCoGreg

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Reply with quote  #101 
Quote:
Originally Posted by zimdba

You put sealant IN tubes?  Interesting - I've never heard of that.


Yeah, sealant in tubes is "old school" which started long before tubeless in the days when the only sealant was Slime.  The better method is to run tubeless but alas my Sport came with the MSO's which require tubes so I'll run those tires for now.  FWIW, a couple years ago the folks at SlowTwitch tested the most common sealants.  They ran three tests: tubeless, latex tubes, butyl tubes.  Across nearly every sealant tubeless worked best and only slightly better than latex tubes.  Butyl tubes sealed but not nearly as quickly as with latex or tubeless.  These tests however were with high pressure road tires.  The much lower pressure and larger volume of gravel and mountain tires should seal more reliably.  Here's a link to Part-1 of the sealant test:
https://www.slowtwitch.com/Products/Things_that_Roll/Tires/Sealant_Test_-_Part_1_4147.html

My experience with sealant inside tubes has been quite good - standard Orange Seal (not the endurance version) in tubes has stayed liquid for over 1.5 years on another gravel bike.  I tend go with more sealant than the minimum so perhaps that slows the drying/curing process???  I'm truly guessing.  Over a couple thousand miles in "goat head" infested farmland I've yet to have a flat when riding the MSO's with tubes and Orange Seal.

Cheers,
Greg

 
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NoCoGreg

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Reply with quote  #102 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chas
I use skinnystripper to run iffy tires tubeless...


As expected, doing a Google search for skinnystripper does in fact turn up some ummmm interesting results. [comp]

Here's a company link:
http://fattystripper.com/

A Leonard Zinn experience with tubeless and skinnystripper...
http://www.velonews.com/2017/02/bikes-and-tech/technical-faq/technical-faq-lennards-big-tubeless-road-experiment_431044


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jjbnum3

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Reply with quote  #103 
Quote:
Originally Posted by squak
Solution to poor shifting.
 
It seems like a few of us reported shifting issues with the Roker Comp.  When mine was set up perfectly and the cable/housing was new it shifted great except for a slight delay when shifting down the cassette between the smallest 3 cogs.  The delay would get worse over time (particularly in wet and muddy conditions) and reached the point of being pretty annoying in less than 200 miles.  It would shift fine when moving up the cassette so I'm convinced the problem is due to drag/friction with the cable and housing.  As the derailleur gets closer the smallest cog there's less spring tension so a free-moving cable is critical to good shifting in those gears.  The primary weak point is where the cable first enters the downtube.  The entry angle is too sharp and creates extra friction/drag where the cable exits the ferrule.  Ideally, the cable’s path of travel should be straight after exiting the ferrule.  As someone else already pointed out, the cable will eventually start sawing into the ferrule creating even more drag.  There’s a similar issue where the cable housing enters the frame at the chainstay, but the angle isn't as sharp.

The solution is to run full length housing.  Running the housing through the frame isn't that hard and once it's done you essentially have a sealed system.  You need to drill out the 2 cable stops, but that's easy.  I feel dumb for not thinking of this sooner.


On A  few other bikes I look at,the FD cable enters the frame closer to front of the bike.
And has less bends.

[2017-Raleigh-Roker-Sport-carbon-gravel-bike-review09] 


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squak

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Reply with quote  #104 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjbnum3


On A  few other bikes I look at,the FD cable enters the frame closer to front of the bike.
And has less bends.

[2017-Raleigh-Roker-Sport-carbon-gravel-bike-review09] 


Roker Comp is 1x so my shifting issues were rear only, but the angle that the cable enters at the top tube is the same for front or rear so potentially a problem for front shifting as well.  Although I don't think you could run full length housing for the front derailleur.  The picture of the Roker Comp from the front on the Raleigh website does a good job showing how the cable enters the top tube at what looks like a 45 degree angle.  If you don't want to run full length housing another option is to route the RD cable housing to the left side of the frame--this results in one less bend and reduced angle where the cable exits the ferrule. 
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squak

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Reply with quote  #105 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurichman


Which bike were you setting up tubeless? My Roker Comp had tubeless tires on it.

spandy24 what ride are you doing? Good luck


Zman
You may want to double check your tires.  The Roker Comp is spec'd with the non-tubeless version of the X'PLOR MSO.  Mine setup tubeless easily on 2 different wheelsets and I've had zero issues with them.
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #106 
Quote:
Originally Posted by squak
You may want to double check your tires.  The Roker Comp is spec'd with the non-tubeless version of the X'PLOR MSO.  Mine setup tubeless easily on 2 different wheelsets and I've had zero issues with them.


i would have to compare the tires that came on my tamland 1 to the tires that came on my roker comp. the reason i say that is on my tamland 1 yes the tires were non tubeless and i never did get the rear to make it tubeless and ran a tube until i switched out to the kenda flintridge pro's. on the comp i would have thought it would have been an issue again if those tires weren't tubeless. now you have me curious though as when those tires wear out i might also try the ones from my tamland 1 that i have laying around. going to go out and put the comp thru the paces this afternoon after installing new gearing on it a 36 front chain ring to try and get ready for the bootlegger 100 next weekend.

is there a chance that the roker comp has different tires on it than the roker sport as the sport has 2x and a little bit lower components with shimano versus the comp sram rival? 




zman

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Kickngas

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Reply with quote  #107 
My Comp came with X'PLOR MSO's that are not tubeless ready. I guess some were shipped with tubeless ready versions and some without, depending on what they had in stock?
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #108 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kickngas
My Comp came with X'PLOR MSO's that are not tubeless ready. I guess some were shipped with tubeless ready versions and some without, depending on what they had in stock?


i guess i got lucky then. i climbed my local mt today 3 miles @ 7-8% solid. i am happy with the gearing now that i have switched out to the 36 front gearing and might just leave it on there for awhile.

zman

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Bentpushrod

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Reply with quote  #109 
My Sport came with MSO X’PLOR non tubeless tires. I swapped them out for Gravelking SK’s in 43 mm and set them up tubeless.
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NoCoGreg

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Reply with quote  #110 
Quote:
Originally Posted by squak
Solution to poor shifting.
 
It seems like a few of us reported shifting issues with the Roker Comp.  When mine was set up perfectly and the cable/housing was new it shifted great except for a slight delay when shifting down the cassette between the smallest 3 cogs.  The delay would get worse over time (particularly in wet and muddy conditions) and reached the point of being pretty annoying in less than 200 miles.  It would shift fine when moving up the cassette so I'm convinced the problem is due to drag/friction with the cable and housing.  As the derailleur gets closer the smallest cog there's less spring tension so a free-moving cable is critical to good shifting in those gears.  The primary weak point is where the cable first enters the downtube.  The entry angle is too sharp and creates extra friction/drag where the cable exits the ferrule.  Ideally, the cable’s path of travel should be straight after exiting the ferrule.  As someone else already pointed out, the cable will eventually start sawing into the ferrule creating even more drag.  There’s a similar issue where the cable housing enters the frame at the chainstay, but the angle isn't as sharp.

The solution is to run full length housing.  Running the housing through the frame isn't that hard and once it's done you essentially have a sealed system.  You need to drill out the 2 cable stops, but that's easy.  I feel dumb for not thinking of this sooner.

Squak, JJ:
I'm wondering if one of these would fit inside the frame? If they fit I think they would eliminate the shifting issues.   So far my Sport is shifting fine, but I only have a few hundred miles...  My wife's Jamis Renegade has slightly different internal cable routing but the derailleur cable entry to the downtube is at a similar angle so I'll have to keep an eye on that.

http://www.jensonusa.com/Shimano-Sealed-End-Cap-WTube-and-Shield-End-Cap-w-Tube-Shield-4-Per-Bag

- or maybe this -
https://www.universalcycles.com/shopping/product_details.php?id=62560


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NoCoGreg

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Reply with quote  #111 
Creaking Seat Post clamp... Sigh

Just a head's up that the seatpost clamp on my Roker Sport likes to creak.  All creaks sound remarkably similar which makes identifying the source that much more maddening.  This creak only occurred while seated and pedaling so it was easier to isolate.

Greasing the binder bolts and the clamp where it holds the seat rails fixed the noise.  If there is a torque spec for the binder bolts I'm certain I've exceeded it. [eek]  Also note that tightening the bolts was iterative in that after tightening the bolts I'd try to rock the seat it by hand - if the creak persisted I'd tighten both bolts.  I think rocking helped get the rails to seat (pun intended) into the clamps.  FWIW, I replaced the stock saddle and it is in a far back position which I'm certain increases the leverage/force on the clamp so a more forward position should be less likely to creak.

Cheers,
Greg

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MCWyeth

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Reply with quote  #112 

I'm browsing through posts on the Raleigh Roker Comp as I'm specifically looking to buy a set of the original wheels from the 2016 Raleigh Roker Comp.

Any chance someone here still has the original wheels from the 2016 Roker Comp and interested in selling?

These were Weinmann Impulse TL wheels (which I think use the Novatec D771/D772 Hubs). That rim just happens to allow the tires I want to use to barely fit in my steel frame Raleigh CX bike, and I have the same hubs in some other wheels so it makes it very easy for me to service them without having to buy yet more expensive tools 😉

I'm interested in purchasing them (or trading a very similar set of wheels PLUS cash).

For Trade: I also have a pair of the very similar Weinmann Impulse TLs that have zero miles - these ones have slightly beefier spokes, 2.0 instead of the stock 1.8, & nicer Japanese EZO bearings than the no-name one that came stock in the OEM Raleigh wheels).

I'd trade these plus add some cash on top to close the deal if interested, please let me know! Thanks!

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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #113 
DSCN0657.jpg 

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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #114 
DSCN0651.jpg  DSCN0651.jpg 

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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #115 
DSCN0648.jpg 

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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #116 
Was taken only because it was at the top of one of my local climbs. No I wouldn't ride on this property.


Zman


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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #117 
DSCN0576.jpg 

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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #118 
Quote:
Originally Posted by spandy24
I just recently snagged a Roker Comp 58cm (I guess one of the last ones, as they've completely disappeared online).  I based this on the feedback here and I must say it is a peach!  As you guys found in your boxes, the rear derailleur hanger was bent on arrival.  Raleigh is sending me a new one though so no biggie.  I will be using this bike as a gravel race bike and I'll likely upgrade some of the weaker components, the seatpost, saddle, stem, bars, crankset, wheels...  I converted the stock tires to tubeless and they are holding air quite well.  I used 70mL of Trucker sealant.


spandy24 curious if you have done any upgrades to your Roker Comp?

Zman

IMG_20180323_172217.jpg

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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #119 
I had some shifting issues on my Roker Comp lately. I was up at the Rose Mt. Rumble with Bobkh and he did do some adjustments on it. Worked for a short period of time but still went back to the original problem. Taking it to the LBS today after some fiddling he found out the real problem. The rear wheel had play in it and he tightened that up. It said it might not have been torqued right from the factory. He also added quite a few drops of some kind of Pedros wax to the rear and front cable housings as there still must had been some binding there. Can't wait to go try it out again.

Zman

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NoCoGreg

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Reply with quote  #120 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurichman

... said it might not have been torqued right from the factory. 

Zman

Zman, did they say what wasn't torqued right?  I'm curious simply as a mechanic and trying to understand what was wrong.  IMHO the only parts which might cause a problem would be the freehub or the cassette itself.

As I await my new  GK SK tires and going tubeless I'm also contemplating if I should go 2x11 or stick to my original plan of replacing the Tiagra shifters/derailleurs to SRAM.  Yeah, I've got too much stuff hanging around the house and I only seem to be accumulating more! :-)



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squak

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Reply with quote  #121 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurichman
I had some shifting issues on my Roker Comp lately. I was up at the Rose Mt. Rumble with Bobkh and he did do some adjustments on it. Worked for a short period of time but still went back to the original problem. Taking it to the LBS today after some fiddling he found out the real problem. The rear wheel had play in it and he tightened that up. It said it might not have been torqued right from the factory. He also added quite a few drops of some kind of Pedros wax to the rear and front cable housings as there still must had been some binding there. Can't wait to go try it out again.

Zman


Switch to full length cable housing. The internal routing on the Roker is wonky and requires too much fuss to get the shifting consistently perfect.  Full housing solves all of that with the added benefit of being a mostly sealed system.  Do it, you'll be happy.
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #122 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoCoGreg

Zman, did they say what wasn't torqued right?  I'm curious simply as a mechanic and trying to understand what was wrong.  IMHO the only parts which might cause a problem would be the freehub or the cassette itself.

As I await my new  GK SK tires and going tubeless I'm also contemplating if I should go 2x11 or stick to my original plan of replacing the Tiagra shifters/derailleurs to SRAM.  Yeah, I've got too much stuff hanging around the house and I only seem to be accumulating more! :-)





I am not the mechanic and will admit that. There was a lot of wobble in the wheel and crazy thing is the older mechanic didn't pick up on it and a really young mechanic came over and grabbed the wheel and noticed the wobble. He took the wheel off and tightened it on the cassette side from what I saw.

I see squak said about going full cable and guessing that would be the way to go to completely solve the shifting issues.

I am going to sometime go 2x Shimano on my bike. Not sure if I am going to do it over the winter or not. If I do it I would like to go a little bit more expensive say that 105 or Ultegra on the crank end to save some weight. So not sure if I will just get a set of wheels built to save some weight or go 2x Shimano. As a long Shimano happy customer I don't think I will ever fall in love with my Sram Rival 1. The other thought process I have is I know you are to not say never say never but right now Lands End and that peanut butter mud down there is where a 1x shines but from reports I have heard some people had to spend $300 - $500 to get their bikes repaired after that ride because of replacing bottom brackets etc. and would put that right up there now with Dirty Kanza 200 as rides I have no thoughts of doing right now.

Zman

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NoCoGreg

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Reply with quote  #123 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurichman

... never say never but right now Lands End and that peanut butter mud down there is where a 1x shines but from reports I have heard some people had to spend $300 - $500 to get their bikes repaired after that ride because of replacing bottom brackets etc. and would put that right up there now with Dirty Kanza 200 as rides I have no thoughts of doing right now.

Zman

I'm with you on avoiding mud...  A good friend got to have his carbon mtb frame repaired after a race in the mud.  Not enough clearance for the tire and the seat stays on his hard tail resulted in the carbon being ground away.  Fortunately the damage was something which could be repaired but stripping the frame down and the cost of shipping and repair was non-trivial.

Mud has also been infamous at grinding down disk brake shoes and all sorts of other stuff.  Sure I'll go thru mud but if it's a mud-fest I'll find something else to do, like sit in a hot tub and drink IPA's. :-)

Regarding your thoughts on SRAM shifters - yeah they're a different breed.  I've found drivetrains can be a religious thing.  I've got so many different setups it keeps me thinking (thumbies on vintage mtb's, bar-ends on Frankenbikes and tandem, trigger shifters on mtb's, SRAM, Shimano and Campy brifters on various bikes and even a couple vintage road bikes with downtube shifters).  Whatever floats your boat is the right way to go. :-)

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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #124 
Mud has also been infamous at grinding down disk brake shoes and all sorts of other stuff.  Sure I'll go thru mud but if it's a mud-fest I'll find something else to do, like sit in a hot tub and drink IPA's. :-)

Regarding your thoughts on SRAM shifters - yeah they're a different breed.  I've found drivetrains can be a religious thing.  I've got so many different setups it keeps me thinking (thumbies on vintage mtb's, bar-ends on Frankenbikes and tandem, trigger shifters on mtb's, SRAM, Shimano and Campy brifters on various bikes and even a couple vintage road bikes with downtube shifters).  Whatever floats your boat is the right way to go. :-)

I guess my question to you and others. Any quess on how much weight I would be adding to the bike going to 2X or how much extra money would it take to buy a lighter crank and or what brand would that be.


Zman


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NoCoGreg

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Reply with quote  #125 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurichman
I guess my question to you and others. Any quess on how much weight I would be adding to the bike going to 2X or how much extra money would it take to buy a lighter crank and or what brand would that be.

Zman

If you haven't already been to the Weight Weenies forum and web site, that's the place to research weights on various components.  Here's a link to get started in the CX/Gravel/Touring forum:
https://weightweenies.starbike.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=4&sid=8e4ccf3c70365bc9dafdb1902052fb2c

Bikeradar.com had a good review of the SRAM Force1 when it was introduced and had the following to say:

"We measured a loss of just 47g when switching from a Force 22 drivetrain with 50/34T chainrings and an 11-28T cassette to a Force 1 setup with a 44T ring and 11-36T cluster. Upgrading to the ultralight (but ultra-expensive) XX1 10-42T cassette, however, would shed another 100g or so."

Full text: https://www.bikeradar.com/us/road/gear/article/sram-1x-road-force-1-and-rival-1-groupsets-first-ride-video-43808/

Here's a Bike Radar review of the Shimano groupsets and has a lot of weights so you can get a feel for difference between SRAM and Shimano. 
https://www.bikeradar.com/us/road/news/article/shimano-105-r7000-group-price-details-52035/

My experience has been there is not that much difference in weight between 105 and Ultegra.  Similarly SRAM/Shimano are quite competitive with each other at the various price points.  Also note that my definition of "not that much" is less than a half pound (220 ish grams).  The true weight weenies would be aghast at that, but my body weight can easily fluctuate a pound or more so for me a couple hundred grams is in the noise so to speak.

I've found a few aluminum wheelsets in the 1,500-to-1,600 gm range and $800 ish price range.  Unfortunately none of these have rims as wide as what is on my Roker (27 ish mm outside).  It seems the road/CX/Gravel wheelsets have 12mm front axles. Fortunately the mtb 29'er wheelsets have many options with 15mm front axles and the 142mm 12mm in the rear.  

I'm having a hard time trying to justify 2x the price to get carbon wheels with maybe 100 gm advantage.

That said, when I update my Roker I'm definitely going to run a full cable housing (uh-oh, more grams).  An 11/32 10spd cassette is fine for my purposes.  If I upgrade to 11 spd I'll probably stay the same range and just have a bit tighter ratios which will be good in the flats.



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