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bobknh

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I have a pair of Gravel King SK's which I've removed from an old wheel set; and trying to install on a different wheels. Originally these seated and sealed easily on my old wheels. On my new wheels however, I had to use a compressor to get them seated. After I seated them,  they would not hold pressure; leaking very badly between the rim and bead. I removed them and examined the bead, and found a thin line of lumpy sealant on the tire bead. This old dry sealant seems to be causing the leak. Is there any way to easily remove the old dry sealant from the tire bead? If I ignore the leakage  caused by the dry sealant on the new rim, will simply installing new sealant after seating the tire, fix the problem? Or, is it best just to install the tire with a tube, now that it is messed up with dry sealant on the bead?
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RoverAl

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Bob I've experienced that too. What I have done is take out all the big chunks with my fingers by pulling or peeling. Then with a damp terry cloth towel or similar, I will pinch it at the bead and work it around the tire to remove the sealant there. I have found it is almost impossible to get every last drop removed but with patience you can get it pretty clean. After that I just refresh the sealant and do the Stans shake thingy all over again.
There is no easy way that I have found maybe others will chime in with their technique.
I try and hose of my tires off now to get any sealant out when storing them.
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bobknh

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RoverAl
Bob I've experienced that too. What I have done is take out all the big chunks with my fingers by pulling or peeling. Then with a damp terry cloth towel or similar, I will pinch it at the bead and work it around the tire to remove the sealant there. I have found it is almost impossible to get every last drop removed but with patience you can get it pretty clean. After that I just refresh the sealant and do the Stans shake thingy all over again.
There is no easy way that I have found maybe others will chime in with their technique.
I try and hose of my tires off now to get any sealant out when storing them.

Hi Al- thanks. Patience is a virtue. But, not one of mine. I started doing what you recommended -- lost my patience before even finishing one bead. I'll probably just mount the tire with a tube. Lesson learned --- once you mount a tubeless tire on a wheel, it is probably a good idea to leave it mounted on that wheel. As a practical matter for me, most of the time, I'm not moving tires from wheel to wheel. Just, as a gravel newbie I've been experimenting with different set-ups: gearing, position, bars, tires, brakes etc. Fun things to occupy my 74 year old brain, and re-populate my garage.
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RoverAl

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Reply with quote  #4 
Whatever works for you BOB , I forgot to say I wipe the rim completely so it looks new. I would give it a fresh shot of sealant and try that. Google stans boogers for more info.
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Zurichman

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Here at my end I had the stock Clement 40cc tire on my Raleigh Tamland. They are a tubed tire. I did the Stans shake thingy and pretty much had the rear only going from a flat tire to a tire that held 35 -40 lbs. I guess I got lucky on the front as it sealed from the get go. I bet if you did the Stans shake once or twice for 24 hrs. on a bucket it would work. Patience isn't one of my virtues either. [rolleyes]

Good luck
Zman

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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bobknh

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobknh

Hi Al- thanks. Patience is a virtue. But, not one of mine. I started doing what you recommended -- lost my patience before even finishing one bead. I'll probably just mount the tire with a tube. Lesson learned --- once you mount a tubeless tire on a wheel, it is probably a good idea to leave it mounted on that wheel. As a practical matter for me, most of the time, I'm not moving tires from wheel to wheel. Just, as a gravel newbie I've been experimenting with different set-ups: gearing, position, bars, tires, brakes etc. Fun things to occupy my 74 year old brain, and re-populate my garage.

Update - I tried a piece of Scotchbrite and a small screwdriver to get into the tubeless groove on the outside of the bead which had a very thin line dried sealant. Both the Scotchbrite and the screw driver helped. But, it is still tedious and frustrating. I'm not in a rush for these tires. I'll work on them for awhile - whenever I have a few spare minutes in my garage. Lesson learned - moving old tubeless tires between wheel sets is a task best avoided by type A folks like me. 
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DrSpoke

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I've been through this multiple times.  What has worked best for me is a small to medium size nylon brush.  I like to use something with bristles of medium length and stiffness.  That is, a bit bigger than a toothbrush though a toothbrush could, I suppose, work too.  But I prefer something a bit bigger, especially the handle.  I've tried some of the small wire brushes and they are ok too.
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bobknh

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrSpoke
I've been through this multiple times.  What has worked best for me is a small to medium size nylon brush.  I like to use something with bristles of medium length and stiffness.  That is, a bit bigger than a toothbrush though a toothbrush could, I suppose, work too.  But I prefer something a bit bigger, especially the handle.  I've tried some of the small wire brushes and they are ok too.

Thanks for the suggestion. My guess is that a nylon brush with fairly stiff bristles would work well. I got after it today with a Scotchbrite pad today with some success. It "only" took about 15 min. per bead, if I went at it with the Scotchbrite and some vigor. I also noticed some of the rubber coating on the tire came off as well; but not enough to damage the tire. The tire seated easily. I'll wait to see if it holds air for a few hours before applying sealant. 
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nalax

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobknh
Lesson learned --- once you mount a tubeless tire on a wheel, it is probably a good idea to leave it mounted on that wheel.

Bob, the problem with that is that you are going to end up with a lot of dried sealant. Neither Stans or Orange Seal is intended to be left in the tire indefinitely. To get optimum performance from tubeless, it is going to require some maintenance. Fortunately for me, I like working on bikes!
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Zurichman

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nalax

Bob, the problem with that is that you are going to end up with a lot of dried sealant. Neither Stans or Orange Seal is intended to be left in the tire indefinitely. To get optimum performance from tubeless, it is going to require some maintenance. Fortunately for me, I like working on bikes!


BTW I don't like working on bikes only riding them but guess I will have to learn and it looks like gravel bikes break down easier than road bikes. [biggrin]

This is all new to me. I was told that you have to add new sealant every 3-4 months. Is this true?


Zman

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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bobknh

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Reply with quote  #11 
Update: Happy ending: After scrubbing dried sealant off the bead with a piece of Scotchbrite, tire seated easily. With 2 oz. Orange seal endurance injected, it is holding pressure very well. It does require some patience, but the job took me less than 30 min. when I went at it with some energy. Not exactly fun, but how often do you try to move tubeless tire between wheels? Like everything tubeless, a newbie like me is slowly learning that it isn't a big deal. My next challenge (no pun intended), is to mount my Compass Bon Jon's tubeless, as a replacement for my Challenge Latex tubes. So far, the Challenge tubes are holding up well. When they fail, it will be time for a tubeless conversion. Thanks to everyone for your help and suggestions.
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #12 
Congrats bobknh. At my end I tried making my Clement mso 40 cm tubeless which they aren't onto a tubeless rim. The front worked out just fine. Had I had a tubeless injector I think I might have been able to get the rear fixed as it was holding 35 - 40 lbs. psi with a few small leaks after the Stans shake.

My next 2 decisions is to either wear these tyres out or buy either the Clement mso 36 tubeless or Gravel King SK 700 x 35. Last decision is what kind of new braking system I want as the braking system on the bike now isn't working on the downhills.


Zman

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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bobknh

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurichman


BTW I don't like working on bikes only riding them but guess I will have to learn and it looks like gravel bikes break down easier than road bikes. [biggrin]

This is all new to me. I was told that you have to add new sealant every 3-4 months. Is this true?


Zman

Not an expert -- but there is no exact formula. There are many factors like how dry is your climate, and the type of tires and rims you are using. My local "expert" is a retired mountain bike racer, and long time LBS owner. His advice to me was to simply keep track of how well the tires are holding air. Once they start losing pressure faster than expected, then add an ounce of sealant. I have a pair of Maxxis Ramblers that have been installed for over a year, which needed only one, one ounce replenishment so far. I guess that eventually, if you haven't already worn the tire out, a full tear down and re-install will be required. Like everything else tubeless, as I'm learning, it's not really a big deal-- especially wide, low pressure gravel tires.
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobknh

Not an expert -- but there is no exact formula. There are many factors like how dry is your climate, and the type of tires and rims you are using. My local "expert" is a retired mountain bike racer, and long time LBS owner. His advice to me was to simply keep track of how well the tires are holding air. Once they start losing pressure faster than expected, then add an ounce of sealant. I have a pair of Maxxis Ramblers that have been installed for over a year, which needed only one, one ounce replenishment so far. I guess that eventually, if you haven't already worn the tire out, a full tear down and re-install will be required. Like everything else tubeless, as I'm learning, it's not really a big deal-- especially wide, low pressure gravel tires.


Thanks for the losing air psi info. Since this all new to me I am trying to get my bike set up for gravel in Kansas(Pony Express 120) which I won't see until the day or so before the ride. I keep hearing about flint and lots of riders burping tires(or flats) this year about 50 I heard on the DK 200 or combo of all the race distances. For that reason I probably want to get use to a set up of 50 lbs in a set of tubeless tires so I don't have to worry about them burping on the rough downhills that I read about. I weigh 200 lbs BTW and hope to be lighter by Sept. 9th.  

Zman

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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RoverAl

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bob
Update: Happy ending: After scrubbing dried sealant off the bead with a piece of Scotchbrite, tire seated easily. With 2 oz. Orange seal endurance injected, it is holding pressure very well. It does require some patience, but the job took me less than 30 min. when I went at it with some energy. Not exactly fun, but how often do you try to move tubeless tire between wheels? Like everything tubeless, a newbie like me is slowly learning that it isn't a big deal. My next challenge (no pun intended), is to mount my Compass Bon Jon's tubeless, as a replacement for my Challenge Latex tubes. So far, the Challenge tubes are holding up well. When they fail, it will be time for a tubeless conversion. Thanks to everyone for your help and suggestions.


Glad it worked out for you Bob, I have a stack of tires in my spare room I am going to clean up the next rainy day. Scotchbrite and a brush seems to be the ticket. Thx
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bobknh

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Reply with quote  #16 
Update - I pulled a 2nd GK from an old wheel and re-installed it on a new wheel today. It went much better than the first time. One advantage, is that I cleaned the the sealant off the bead with a Scotbrite pad right after I removed the tire, and rinsed out any old liquid sealant. On the prior tire, I let it hang around the garage a few weeks before trying to mount it on the new wheel. The 2nd tire seated perfectly on the new wheel. I may even throw in some sealant and ride it this afternoon. Two take aways - if you want to move an old tubeless tire to a new wheel:
- Clean the beads right away, after you remove the old sealant and rinse the tire.
- Use a Scotchbrite pad to speed the job up. If the tire is slightly wet, it seems to speed things up as well.
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