jmcgukin
Curious if anyone has ridden both the redshift shockstop stem and the lauf Grit fork and could compare and contrast them?

I like the idea of the Grit, but the shockstop stem costs way less and looks a lot more normal
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egear
I have only ridden on my buddy's but it works ok.  You have to get past the way the handelbar feels in your hand as it moves around of course.  Its not a Grit fork though.  The fork has progression that the elastomer cant really duplicate.
Never blame the bike it's rarely the bikes fault !!
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DrBagg
Have not ridden the laud, but know a couple of people have to warranty theirs, because the carbon delaminated. Have been riding the shockstop since the landrun 100, this past March. Only negative thing I can think of, is it's square shape, can't put my gps/phone/?? on the stem. Other than that....i love it
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swmlon
DrBagg wrote:
Have not ridden the laud, but know a couple of people have to warranty theirs, because the carbon delaminated. Have been riding the shockstop since the landrun 100, this past March. Only negative thing I can think of, is it's square shape, can't put my gps/phone/?? on the stem. Other than that....i love it


Did you buy chance run a handlebar bag with the Shockstop? I'm curious of getting one of these, but I think my handlebar bag may affect performance of the stem.
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DrBagg
No bag, as of yet, sorry
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Dwillis
I'll take a stab at your question.  I ride with a Redshift Shocktop stem, but have never ridden a Lauf.  The Lauf is a suspension fork and as part of a suspension system, its primary function is to keep the wheel/tire combo in touch with the ground as much as possible.  Comfort is a nice by-product.  The  Shockstop, on the other hand, is more of a comfort item to relieve fatigue and "buzziness" associate with a long gravel ride.  It think it's a bit much to ask a stem to act as a suspension piece to improve traction.  So, I don't think they can be directly compared as I do not believe they were designed to solve the same problem. 

Riding Dirty Kanza caused temporary paralysis ("cyclist palsy") in my right hand at mile 85 and required me to shift gears with my left hand.  So far the Shocktop has prevented that from reoccurring.  Hope this helps.
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chunkyhugo
jmcgukin wrote:
Curious if anyone has ridden both the redshift shockstop stem and the lauf Grit fork and could compare and contrast them?

I like the idea of the Grit, but the shockstop stem costs way less and looks a lot more normal

It's not so much that the shockstop looks normal so much as the Lauf Grit looks plain ugly. Aesthetics are important as well as function.
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Volsung
Has anyone tried both simultaneously? I'm curious if they died of comfort.
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EddNog
Volsung wrote:
Has anyone tried both simultaneously? I'm curious if they died of comfort.


I've been running a 6-degree ShockStop on my road/cross bike and a 30-degree ShockStop on my gravel bike for months now.

I have a Lauf Grit on order for my gravel bike. I am planning to test the Grit with and without the ShockStop once it comes in.

I will report back once I have sufficient hours in the saddle with the Grit alone and with the Grit combined with the ShockStop.

All that being said, I will tell you that the 6-degree and the 30-degree ShockStops, on their own, feel very different from each other as it is to start (the 30-degree model requires firmer elastomer selection to achieve the same firmness as the 6-degree).

-Ed
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DerekJ_MI
I have the 30-degree ShockStop and the Lauf Grit fork on my Lynskey GR 250.  I just finished DK 200 this past Saturday.  Get them both.  They both work but in different ways.  You will need to tweak the ShockStop to get the feel just right but when tweaked it's great!
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clarksonxc
DerekJ_MI wrote:
I have the 30-degree ShockStop and the Lauf Grit fork on my Lynskey GR 250.  I just finished DK 200 this past Saturday.  Get them both.  They both work but in different ways.  You will need to tweak the ShockStop to get the feel just right but when tweaked it's great!


Derek - curious as to how you tweaked your ShockStop?  I just set one up on my girlfriend's bike, and figured to err on the side of caution (i.e. more stiff) because she we coming from a rigid fork/stem on her Jamis Renegade.  She hasn't ridden any gravel with it yet, but what did you need to adjust?  Preload?  Stiffer/softer?  Thanks!
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bobknh
Dwillis wrote:
I'll take a stab at your question.  I ride with a Redshift Shocktop stem, but have never ridden a Lauf.  The Lauf is a suspension fork and as part of a suspension system, its primary function is to keep the wheel/tire combo in touch with the ground as much as possible.  Comfort is a nice by-product.  The  Shockstop, on the other hand, is more of a comfort item to relieve fatigue and "buzziness" associate with a long gravel ride.  It think it's a bit much to ask a stem to act as a suspension piece to improve traction.  So, I don't think they can be directly compared as I do not believe they were designed to solve the same problem. 

Riding Dirty Kanza caused temporary paralysis ("cyclist palsy") in my right hand at mile 85 and required me to shift gears with my left hand.  So far the Shocktop has prevented that from reoccurring.  Hope this helps.

Thanks for the good explanation. I just installed a Body Float seatpost on my gravel bike with the same idea - isolate the body, rather than the bike, to reduce body fatigue. The bike still bounces around; but I don't as much. A suspension improves the performance of the bike - a good thing - and indirectly may also improve comfort. While products like the Shockstop and Body Float, are designed with more modest goals - to improve comfort and fatigue - also a good thing.
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DerekJ_MI
clarksonxc wrote:


Derek - curious as to how you tweaked your ShockStop?  I just set one up on my girlfriend's bike, and figured to err on the side of caution (i.e. more stiff) because she we coming from a rigid fork/stem on her Jamis Renegade.  She hasn't ridden any gravel with it yet, but what did you need to adjust?  Preload?  Stiffer/softer?  Thanks!


Tweak?  well, poor choice of words.  Adjust it so that the correct amount of stiffeners are installed that provide good shock resistance yet are not too bouncy.  Much of this depends on your weight.
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clarksonxc
DerekJ_MI wrote:


Tweak?  well, poor choice of words.  Adjust it so that the correct amount of stiffeners are installed that provide good shock resistance yet are not too bouncy.  Much of this depends on your weight.


I gotcha, but did you find you needed to go stiff or lighter than what they recommended for your weight? Not that I'm going to make any changes before she has some substantial miles on it, but I'm just wondering how close their factory recommendations were for you and others.
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DerekJ_MI
clarksonxc wrote:


I gotcha, but did you find you needed to go stiff or lighter than what they recommended for your weight? Not that I'm going to make any changes before she has some substantial miles on it, but I'm just wondering how close their factory recommendations were for you and others.


I needed to go stiffer, much stiffer.  I'm 6' - 230lbs and the resisters that are installed by the manufacturer are a bit too soft, for me.  This said it's a personnel thing.  You/she might like it the way it comes.
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ronpal
I've had the Shockstop stem for about 6 months now on my Ti gravel bike.  At first I had it set up at a stiffer elastomer setting then recommend for my weight since I thought the up and down bouncing motion would bother me.  It's a very solidly built stem and there is no side to side movement but I was actually not that impressed with the shock reduction.  After a few months I decided to go to a elastomer setting softer then recommended for my weight, and boy what a difference.  IT absorbs a lot of the gravel really well and makes for a comfortable smooth ride.  But my biggest surprise was what a difference it made on fast gravel descents when I hit sections of wash board.  The bike still bounces around since the bike is not suspended but my hand hold on the handlebars felt secure and I never felt like my hands would fall off or let go due to the violent shaking I've had before.  Now at this extra soft setting the handlebars do move up and down while climbing especially when standing on steeper climbs and dives down when braking and those movements bothered me at first but I've gotten used to them.  The brake diving is really no big deal at all now and although the bouncing while climbing is not great I'm not sure it is really hurting my climbing much if at all.  Remember its just an up and down motion, there is NO lateral play or twist, the stem and handlebar still feel very secure.  I think the only time the motion would really bother me is during a full on sprint when you really torque the bars to put max power to the pedals, but thats something I don't do on my gravel bike anyways.  I plan to try the middle elastomer recommended  setting sometime soon, I assume that might be the goldilocks setting for me.  I guess my point is if you get the Shockstop stem try different elastomer combinations,  it can make a big difference.  The only thing I don't like about the stem is the weight, like most cyclist I'm a weight wee nee at heart, but for my gravel bike I think I will leave it on.  
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Josh33172

I don't have any experience with the Lauf GRIT, but I do have experience with the Lauf that I had on my Lynskey that I used quite a lot on gravel. I guess the real difference was the 30mm extra of travel and obviously mtb tires but also 40c MSO's. I also have used the RedShift Briefly only because I spotted on someone else's bike and rode around for a few minutes.

I believe its fair to echo that they're objectively different. So the Lauf on my MTB was really good as long as I was in the saddle. It actually tracked better than some of the best air forks on the market. Out of the saddle meant most of the travel was consumed under my weight. The only time I found this to be good was climbing, it climbed really good and you could feel the bike surging every pedal stroke without the lag of fork squat.

To me, the RedShift stem really felt like it was meant to isolate the bars/hands as a contact point. When the bike hit a bump or really anything that wasn't smooth, you'd still feel it in the rest of the bike, but it was a bit more muted in the handlebars. The Lauf would actually absorb bumps entirely until that bump made it to the rear wheel.

One of the biggest differences which for some reason people don't consider, and maybe its more of a problem where I am with the constant coastal winds on open unprotected terrain is aero. For some reason, the fork seemed to catch more wind than even the SID team fork. I don't know if the GRIT is different/better in that regard.

What I do know is that Lauf just released the True Grit bike which has a "GRIT LS" fork that's shaped different and suppose to be lighter and laterally stiffer. Lighter is always better, going to a Lauf fork meant adding about 1lb of weight to the bike, the RedShift stem....slightly less than half that.

Trek Boon 5 Disc

Ibis Ripley LS

GT Peace Tour Disc Commuter

Cervelo S2 Ultegra

Kona Honzo ST Singlespeed

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frontrangegravel
chunkyhugo wrote:
It's not so much that the shockstop looks normal so much as the Lauf Grit looks plain ugly. Aesthetics are important as well as function.


I'm really opposite of this opinion. Function over aesthetics all day every day. 
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chunkyhugo
frontrangegravel wrote:


I'm really opposite of this opinion. Function over aesthetics all day every day. 

I'm not questioning the functionality of the Lauf. I've no reason to doubt lots of riders who love the forks and now see them as an integral part of their off-road experience.
They are ugly though and that is not something I've ever said about, say, MTB suspension forks. This is just my opinion and others will think they are a thing of beauty...no doubt.
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Eraguil
Is the amount of comfort provided by the Shockstop stem worth adding .3 lbs to the weight of my bike? 😬
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DrBagg
Eraguil wrote:
Is the amount of comfort provided by the Shockstop stem worth adding .3 lbs to the weight of my bike? 😬


Yup. I have one on my crux, one on my bone, and will eventually get one for the road bike and tandem.
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DrBagg
Josh33172 wrote:

I don't have any experience with the Lauf GRIT, but I do have experience with the Lauf that I had on my Lynskey that I used quite a lot on gravel. I guess the real difference was the 30mm extra of travel and obviously mtb tires but also 40c MSO's. I also have used the RedShift Briefly only because I spotted on someone else's bike and rode around for a few minutes.

I believe its fair to echo that they're objectively different. So the Lauf on my MTB was really good as long as I was in the saddle. It actually tracked better than some of the best air forks on the market. Out of the saddle meant most of the travel was consumed under my weight. The only time I found this to be good was climbing, it climbed really good and you could feel the bike surging every pedal stroke without the lag of fork squat.

To me, the RedShift stem really felt like it was meant to isolate the bars/hands as a contact point. When the bike hit a bump or really anything that wasn't smooth, you'd still feel it in the rest of the bike, but it was a bit more muted in the handlebars. The Lauf would actually absorb bumps entirely until that bump made it to the rear wheel.

One of the biggest differences which for some reason people don't consider, and maybe its more of a problem where I am with the constant coastal winds on open unprotected terrain is aero. For some reason, the fork seemed to catch more wind than even the SID team fork. I don't know if the GRIT is different/better in that regard.

What I do know is that Lauf just released the True Grit bike which has a "GRIT LS" fork that's shaped different and suppose to be lighter and laterally stiffer. Lighter is always better, going to a Lauf fork meant adding about 1lb of weight to the bike, the RedShift stem....slightly less than half that.



I think the stems are awesome....plus I'm cheap, I rather pay $200-300 less, thank ya very much
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HollyBoni
Eraguil wrote:
Is the amount of comfort provided by the Shockstop stem worth adding .3 lbs to the weight of my bike? 😬


Don't be a p***y, you shouldn't care about comfort in the first place. That +0.3lbs means you might not get all them Strava KOMs, and if you don't do that why would you even ride your bike?
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ljsmith
Eraguil wrote:
Is the amount of comfort provided by the Shockstop stem worth adding .3 lbs to the weight of my bike? 😬


Unless you are riding in the Tour de France and every millisecond counts, then adding 0.3 lbs to your bike is not going to make any difference at all.  If you are really concerned you could just lose 0.3 lbs.  In all likely hood you will be faster over a long gravel ride because of the vibration damping effect.  I remember back in the late 80s/early 90s when mountain bikers were arguing over whether the extra weight of suspension was worth it, I don't think you will find anyone arguing over that anymore.  
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