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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #76 
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoota


Yep, nice photo. Just be aware those Clement MSOs aren't specifically tubeless ready (none of the 40mm versions are TR). And there are 36mm MSOs that aren't TR either. Like the ones that came on my wife's Jamis Renegade. They appear to be a cheap, crappy OEM only version. Really ticked me off. Every Clement TR tire has a white label on the tire stating so.


I was able to get my front to go tubeless but not my back. I have no clue what other gravel bike Companies put on their bikes but the Clement even though they aren't tubeless seem to be a pretty good tire to me. I will wear mine out before I replace them I like them that much.

Zman

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shoota

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Reply with quote  #77 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurichman


I was able to get my front to go tubeless but not my back. I have no clue what other gravel bike Companies put on their bikes but the Clement even though they aren't tubeless seem to be a pretty good tire to me. I will wear mine out before I replace them I like them that much.

Zman


The Strada USHs that came on our bike are TR. But they're 32mm, f me. That also kinda ticked me off. Why in the world would they spec a 32mm tire on a gravel bike? I pulled those off and sold them. And you must have done something wrong with the rear, it should have set up tubeless. Anyhoo, enough ranting.
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RoverAl

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Reply with quote  #78 
https://www.raleighusa.com/road/adventure

Raleigh changed the category from all road to adventure interesting, this means good things to come (I hope) 
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shoota

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Reply with quote  #79 
Hmm, I guess. Sounds like there's no one term for anything in this category though. What could calling it "Adventure" change on the bike? To me the Stuntman already was their adventure bike.
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RoverAl

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Reply with quote  #80 
Not sure but I am hoping they develop or add to the line in meaningful ways.
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RoverAl

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Reply with quote  #81 
Well from my source  one of the 2018 Tamlands will feature breakaway design by Ritchey. 
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shoota

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Reply with quote  #82 
Really.....
what's the purpose of the breakaway design again? Just to make it more portable?
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #83 
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoota


The Strada USHs that came on our bike are TR. But they're 32mm, f me. That also kinda ticked me off. Why in the world would they spec a 32mm tire on a gravel bike? I pulled those off and sold them. And you must have done something wrong with the rear, it should have set up tubeless. Anyhoo, enough ranting.


My bike came with the 40mm which aren't tubeless.

Zman

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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shoota

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Reply with quote  #84 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurichman


My bike came with the 40mm which aren't tubeless.

Zman


Ah, yeah that explains it. To be fair the MSO does look like a good tire. I just wish there was a lightweight ~38mm TR version.
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #85 
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoota
Really.....
what's the purpose of the breakaway design again? Just to make it more portable?


Yeah it is at least $75 one way now and maybe $100 to fly with your bike. With the breakaway you pretty much can put it in a regular suit case versus a bike bag which they can tell in a heartbeat and charge you. Before 9/11 when you could check in your luggage curbside and now some like Southwest you still can. I use to just give the bell hop $20 and he would get my bike on without any charge. Boy those days are over though. [mad] I now use bikeflights instead.

Zman

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #86 
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoota


Ah, yeah that explains it. To be fair the MSO does look like a good tire. I just wish there was a lightweight ~38mm TR version.


I had a hard core mt. biker/cyclist look at the stats on my bike/Raleigh photo and he was impressed that Raleigh put such a good tire on their bike so I just thought other companies were putting on junk OEM tires on their bikes.

Zman

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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shoota

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Reply with quote  #87 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurichman


I had a hard core mt. biker/cyclist look at the stats on my bike/Raleigh photo and he was impressed that Raleigh put such a good tire on their bike so I just thought other companies were putting on junk OEM tires on their bikes.

Zman


Well I guess I'm just of the opinion that if you spec a TR wheelset you should at least spec TR tires, if not tubeless valves as well. But I'm well aware it's probably a cost issue. I just think it stinks.
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #88 
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoota


Well I guess I'm just of the opinion that if you spec a TR wheelset you should at least spec TR tires, if not tubeless valves as well. But I'm well aware it's probably a cost issue. I just think it stinks.


Well maybe he just saw the tire name and didn't realize it wasn't tubeless.

Since you and Roveral know lots more about gravel bikes than me. If you were getting your bike ready for a Kansas gravel race(Pony Express 120) would you go with the Gravel King sk 38mm or Clement xplor mso 38mm both are tubeless ready or something else. I need to go climb the mt on my race bike. lol

Zman

 

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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AlanEsh

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Reply with quote  #89 
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoota


Well I guess I'm just of the opinion that if you spec a TR wheelset you should at least spec TR tires, if not tubeless valves as well. But I'm well aware it's probably a cost issue. I just think it stinks.


I think they're just shooting for a spot between the racer and the hobbyist. They give you a basis for going tubeless (wheel/rim) if you want, but they put the bikes in the showroom with tubed setups so the less concerned rider doesn't have to learn how to tubeless.
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shoota

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Reply with quote  #90 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurichman


Well maybe he just saw the tire name and didn't realize it wasn't tubeless.

Since you and Roveral know lots more about gravel bikes than me. If you were getting your bike ready for a Kansas gravel race(Pony Express 120) would you go with the Gravel King sk 38mm or Clement xplor mso 38mm both are tubeless ready or something else. I need to go climb the mt on my race bike. lol

Zman

 


Do you mean the 36mm MSO, there is no 38mm that I'm aware of.
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shoota

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Reply with quote  #91 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanEsh


I think they're just shooting for a spot between the racer and the hobbyist. They give you a basis for going tubeless (wheel/rim) if you want, but they put the bikes in the showroom with tubed setups so the less concerned rider doesn't have to learn how to tubeless.


And it's way cheaper for them.
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #92 
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoota


Do you mean the 36mm MSO, there is no 38mm that I'm aware of.


Yeah I meant the 36mm showing how much I know about tires. [biggrin]

Zman

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shoota

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Reply with quote  #93 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurichman


Yeah I meant the 36mm showing how much I know about tires. [biggrin]

Zman


For DK I'd be really tempted to say MSO over Rambler. Even thought the MSO is a little heavier I think I would trust it in the (sharp) FLINT Hills more than the lighter-cased Rambler.
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knl2stl

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Reply with quote  #94 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanEsh


I think they're just shooting for a spot between the racer and the hobbyist. They give you a basis for going tubeless (wheel/rim) if you want, but they put the bikes in the showroom with tubed setups so the less concerned rider doesn't have to learn how to tubeless.



Sure, they want to give you the option to go tubeless, but they put the bikes on the floor with tubes since that is how they are assembled over seas.  They are not going to put sealant in a bike built over seas that might not make it off the floor for months.  TL in this case simply means that the rims are taped, and that if you mount a sealant friendly tire with sealant, then you have reached tubelessness, if the job is done correctly and the combo holds.  There is nothing special about the Weinmann Impulse TL Double Wall rim that makes it tubeless in and of itself.  Stan's no tubes rims are not tubeless in and of themselves.  You still need tape and sealant.  The Stan's do have a special bead hook, like many rims designed to run tubeless, which the Weinmann Impulse TL Double Wall rims do not look like they have.  
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shoota

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Reply with quote  #95 
Quote:
Originally Posted by knl2stl



Sure, they want to give you the option to go tubeless, but they put the bikes on the floor with tubes since that is how they are assembled over seas.  They are not going to put sealant in a bike built over seas that might not make it off the floor for months.  TL in this case simply means that the rims are taped, and that if you mount a sealant friendly tire with sealant, then you have reached tubelessness, if the job is done correctly and the combo holds.  There is nothing special about the Weinmann Impulse TL Double Wall rim that makes it tubeless in and of itself.  Stan's no tubes rims are not tubeless in and of themselves.  You still need tape and sealant.  The Stan's do have a special bead hook, like many rims designed to run tubeless, which the Weinmann Impulse TL Double Wall rims do not look like they have.  


Say what now? If I read that right you're saying that the Weinmann Impulse TL rims are no different than a typical road rim designed only for tubes and that the only thing that makes them tubeless ready is that they have tubeless tape? 

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knl2stl

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Reply with quote  #96 
That is the way that most rims become tubeless ready.  I am not that familiar with the Weinmann Impulse TL, however.  Still, there seems to be nothing other than tubeless tape that makes it tubeless ready.  
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shoota

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Reply with quote  #97 
Quote:
Originally Posted by knl2stl
That is the way that most rims become tubeless ready.  I am not that familiar with the Weinmann Impulse TL, however.  Still, there seems to be nothing other than tubeless tape that makes it tubeless ready.  


While that may be true for road rims and maybe in the early days of TR rims it is certainly not the case now. Both of my TR rims (Weinmann Impulse and AC MTB Race) have a channel next to the rim wall that the tire beads "snaps" into, along with the "hook", as you called it, on the inside of the rim wall to interface with the tire bead adn hold it tightly. Personally, you wouldn't catch me dead using anything that isn't TR by design, even though people have had success with non-TR combos. I just don't think it's worth chancing I guess.
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knl2stl

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Reply with quote  #98 
I think that it is still the case now for many rims.  I could be wrong, but I don't think that Weinmann markets the Impulse as tubeless ready.  Raleigh and other bike manufactures call rims tubeless ready by having the rims taped.  Kona did that with Alex rims for a long time, but the rim joints themselves leaked so much sealant.  They still use Alex wheels on bikes like the Rove, but the tubeless ready claim is gone.  AC markets many of their rims/wheelsets as tubeless, and those rims/sets have the AC bead barb before the hook above the channel well, that helps the tire slide into place and helps prevent burbing at low psi.  AC, which I ride, state flat out which rims are tubeless.  Stan's, which I ride, state flat out that their rims are tubeless ready since they come taped with valves installed.  WTB has a tubeless rim design as do other rim makers, and then there is UST, which we are not talking about at all here.  I would like to see a statement sourced from Weinmann as to what it is about the actual design of the Impulse that adds a tubeless ability to it.  Some like AC and WTB (and Stan's) make actual statements about their rims.   I just looked at the Weinmann site and the cut away image of the Impulse.  It shows nothing like the bead barb on the AC tubeless rims or the WTB rims.  
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shoota

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Reply with quote  #99 
Quote:
Originally Posted by knl2stl
I think that it is still the case now for many rims.  I could be wrong, but I don't think that Weinmann markets the Impulse as tubeless ready.  Raleigh and other bike manufactures call rims tubeless ready by having the rims taped.  Kona did that with Alex rims for a long time, but the rim joints themselves leaked so much sealant.  They still use Alex wheels on bikes like the Rove, but the tubeless ready claim is gone.  AC markets many of their rims/wheelsets as tubeless, and those rims/sets have the AC bead barb before the hook above the channel well, that helps the tire slide into place and helps prevent burbing at low psi.  AC, which I ride, state flat out which rims are tubeless.  Stan's, which I ride, state flat out that their rims are tubeless ready since they come taped with valves installed.  WTB has a tubeless rim design as do other rim makers, and then there is UST, which we are not talking about at all here.  I would like to see a statement sourced from Weinmann as to what it is about the actual design of the Impulse that adds a tubeless ability to it.  Some like AC and WTB (and Stan's) make actual statements about their rims.   I just looked at the Weinmann site and the cut away image of the Impulse.  It shows nothing like the bead barb on the AC tubeless rims or the WTB rims.  


I'll defer to your greater knowledge but my Impulse SL rims are definitely marketed as tubeless.

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knl2stl

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Reply with quote  #100 
That might just be due to being taped.  I wish the Weinmann site was more informative.  What year Tamland are you talking about, however?  I think the rims on Zurichman are from the 2016 Tamland.  I think I saw his bike being a 2016.  I don't think that those are the U28 with a tubeless sticker.  So, we might not even be talking about the same rims here.  

Editing here:  Looking at the 2016 and 2017 Tamland specs.  The 2016 state:  Weinmann Impulse TL Double Wall.  The 2017 specs add: U28.  Still, I want to see a claim from Weinmann as to what beyond the tape makes whatever rim in question a better rim for running tubeless above a regular rim.  There still seems to be nothing about the rim that makes it tubeless beyond the tape, and sticker:  http://www.weinmanntek.com/Products/DISC/U28.htm
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