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DerekJ_MI

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Reply with quote  #1 
I want to upgrade my riding in the rain gear.  I'm looking for recommendations on what works good.  I'm looking at everything including jackets, pants, gloves, booties maybe even helmet covers.  Obviously money matters but it's go to work!  So it that means several hundred for a jacket cause it works then so be it.  I have less expensive stuff that is supposed to work but doesn't.  At least not in continuous downpours during century rides.

Thanks,
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #2 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DerekJ_MI
I want to upgrade my riding in the rain gear.  I'm looking for recommendations on what works good.  I'm looking at everything including jackets, pants, gloves, booties maybe even helmet covers.  Obviously money matters but it's go to work!  So it that means several hundred for a jacket cause it works then so be it.  I have less expensive stuff that is supposed to work but doesn't.  At least not in continuous downpours during century rides.

Thanks,


Derek I really like the Showers Pass rain gear. It is manufactured in Oregon/Washington state where they get no rain. lol The 2.0 if I remember right is the heavy jacket. It breathes very well and you won't get sweaty or clammy and best part of it you will stay dry forever.. Their lightweight summer weight isn't as breathable and yes you will get clammy inside because it doesn't breath very well. I have not tried their gortex gloves yet or gortex socks but I have read good things about them. Western Bike has the 2.0 jacket on sale at times but figure around $200 for it. Bike Gore also makes good stuff and JOM over at gravel cyclist did a review on one of their rain jackets.

Derek I looked it up and it is the Elite 2.1 and at Western Bike Works right now it is $244. The Showers Pass for me at least runs true to size has adjustable long cuffs and pit zips to adjust the heat. I guess it depends on whether you are a cold or warmer rider as to the temps for this jacket but for me this jacket works good in the 55 deg. F down to 30 deg. F range. Where it really shines for me though when you are dead tired which I was on the Cascades 1200k and now 50 deg. F feels like 30-40 deg. F the jacket just flat out keep me toastie warm and that is what I am looking for/need in a rain jacket. It also has a longer tail on it which would help you gravel riding from the water getting slung up on your backside. On the Bike Gore line it has always fit me about 1 sizing too small. There is a review on the Bike Gore rain jacket over at Gravelcyclist by JOM. 


Good luck I hope this helps.
Zman

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mr_slow

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Reply with quote  #3 
I've been riding some Gore Bike Wear pants for 7 or so years, they've lasted and they work. The only annoying thing, the storage pocket zipper can cause some discomfort if using a large backpack, but other than that, they're great. 

I also bought some Showers Pass waterproof socks, which are kind of neat, but they fit very odd, and don't seem to truly work... so maybe avoid them and go for a good waterproof shoe cover, as those have served me quite well, I have some "cheap" Pearl Izumi covers, and they've been solid. 

As for jackets, I've never found a good one weather type fits all. In Colorado we get a lot of cold rain, and some summer warm rain, which is why I've ended up with several rain jackets. For the summer, I use a very light, very pack-able Craft rain "cape", I've used it for cold rain as well, but it lets me know I choose incorrectly. For colder days, I have a Mavic rain coat, but it gets hot very quickly if the temps start to exceed 45-50F. And for really cold (usually best with snow), I use the 3-in-1 Pearl Izumi jacket, that thing is good between -10F (no rain) up to 35. 

I think if you take Zman's advice and get stuff from Gore or Showers Pass, you won't go wrong, since thats what those two companies are all about. 

Cheers!
Greg
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bobknh

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Reply with quote  #4 
My $.02: Perhaps the best investment for rainy weather riding is a good set of fenders for your bike. Hopefully your bike has fender mounts. If not, there are usually ways to retro fit them. The main issue you may run into is tire clearance; but a good set of fenders can make a huge difference in comfort and safety in wet weather. I usually avoid riding in wet weather, but if our New England dirt roads are muddy - especially in the Spring mud season, I use a plastic rear fender which clips onto my seat post: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B000X61N2A/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1
This plastic fender is easy to install and remove without tools, and does a reasonable job of preventing mud and water spraying down my back. Although it designed for 26" mountain bike wheels, it works equally well on 700C gravel wheels. But, nothing beats a good set of hammered alu. full coverage fenders. If you scroll down through Jan Heine's blog, you'll find an interesting article on fenders:
https://janheine.wordpress.com
Jan is a controversial guy with very strong opinions - some of which I don't agree with. But, at least he tries to test the ideas he advocates. And I tend to agree with his claims about the benefits of full Alu. fenders.
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clarksonxc

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Reply with quote  #5 
With LandRun coming up I am starting to take a more serious approach to this as well.  Some items I can review; others I literally just received so I don't have any real thoughts on yet.  Everything I purchased was researched to some degree as to what would actually work for my needs.

Hat:  Got a Gore-Tex thermal cycling cap from Swrve.  Not sure if they make it anymore, but it has proven itself many times over.

Jacket:  Gore-Tex 1985 Shakedry direct from Gore-Tex.  Very pricey, but recommended by Nick Legan.  This jacket is very well outfitted (fit, cuffs, collar, etc) and I am very happy with it.  My previous jacket was the Twin Six rain coat, which worked well, but it didn't have the insulation quality that I was looking for to combat against a cold, constant rain.

Gloves:  Aerostitch Gauntlet.  These were also suggested by Nick, and while I should've sized down (bought the Large instead of Medium), they have worked great as well.  They are the "lobster" type with two fingers grouped together, but other than that I cannot complain.  I got some neoprene ones as a backup from a local outdoors store, I will try them out as well (they pass the faucet test).

Pants:  I have not tested any of these yet, but I recently purchased the Pactimo Storm+ 12hr bibs and leg warmers, Castelli Polare 2 bibtight, and Showers Pass Transit pant.  After trying everything on I feel like they they would be best suited for wet-wetter-wettest in that order.  I can't imagine riding the entirety of LandRun in the Transit Pants, but if it's 38 and raining the whole way it might be the only way to survive.

Feet:  I did not want to buy any special rain or winter specific shoes or boots, so I decided to layer on both sides of my current shoes.  I got the Showers Pass waterproof socks, and while they are fairly bulky (not a normal cycling sock fit, even compared to heavier wool thermal socks) they fit in my shoes with some effort.  I also got a set of Endura mtn overshoes, which are mostly neoprene and very sturdy.  Nick suggested the Velotoze rubber overshoes, which are very nice, but I don't think they'd survive 9 miles of walking in Oklahoma.  

With all of that said; in the most extreme circumstances I now have gear that would last a 100mi cold deluge.  It won't be comfortable (it never is), and it wasn't cheap, but if it means the difference between a finish and a DNF it's worth it.  More to come if I get some rain miles in the following weeks.
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by clarksonxc
With LandRun coming up I am starting to take a more serious approach to this as well.  Some items I can review; others I literally just received so I don't have any real thoughts on yet.  Everything I purchased was researched to some degree as to what would actually work for my needs.

Hat:  Got a Gore-Tex thermal cycling cap from Swrve.  Not sure if they make it anymore, but it has proven itself many times over.

Jacket:  Gore-Tex 1985 Shakedry direct from Gore-Tex.  Very pricey, but recommended by Nick Legan.  This jacket is very well outfitted (fit, cuffs, collar, etc) and I am very happy with it.  My previous jacket was the Twin Six rain coat, which worked well, but it didn't have the insulation quality that I was looking for to combat against a cold, constant rain.

Gloves:  Aerostitch Gauntlet.  These were also suggested by Nick, and while I should've sized down (bought the Large instead of Medium), they have worked great as well.  They are the "lobster" type with two fingers grouped together, but other than that I cannot complain.  I got some neoprene ones as a backup from a local outdoors store, I will try them out as well (they pass the faucet test).

Pants:  I have not tested any of these yet, but I recently purchased the Pactimo Storm+ 12hr bibs and leg warmers, Castelli Polare 2 bibtight, and Showers Pass Transit pant.  After trying everything on I feel like they they would be best suited for wet-wetter-wettest in that order.  I can't imagine riding the entirety of LandRun in the Transit Pants, but if it's 38 and raining the whole way it might be the only way to survive.

Feet:  I did not want to buy any special rain or winter specific shoes or boots, so I decided to layer on both sides of my current shoes.  I got the Showers Pass waterproof socks, and while they are fairly bulky (not a normal cycling sock fit, even compared to heavier wool thermal socks) they fit in my shoes with some effort.  I also got a set of Endura mtn overshoes, which are mostly neoprene and very sturdy.  Nick suggested the Velotoze rubber overshoes, which are very nice, but I don't think they'd survive 9 miles of walking in Oklahoma.  

With all of that said; in the most extreme circumstances I now have gear that would last a 100mi cold deluge.  It won't be comfortable (it never is), and it wasn't cheap, but if it means the difference between a finish and a DNF it's worth it.  More to come if I get some rain miles in the following weeks.


read all the things you bought. I have a big time problem getting cycling shoes to fit because my left foot is about 1/2 size bigger. So yeah I have lots of experience getting hot feet which then leads to numbness in your feet which after awhile will make you get off the bike. Those goretex socks that was a tight fit IMHO will cause that. You might want to try them out before you try them in that race. I got a hot foot so bad in one race I had to withdraw so don't want to see that happening to you.

Good luck
Zman

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DerekJ_MI

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Reply with quote  #7 
thanks for the tips.  I'm looking into several suggestions.
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clarksonxc

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Reply with quote  #8 
Can report on the Castelli Perfetto long sleeve jersey and Castelli Polare 2 bibtights from a ride this weekend.  It started out mid-40's, sunny and calm, and I was downright warm.  Maybe even overdressed.  Then about 2hrs in it started to rain and the temperature dropped to mid-30's.  While the Castelli gear held up well for those conditions, I could tell that they were not meant to survive an entire day like that.  Any more than a few hours like that and I think you'd have a very unpleasant experience.  So, they performed pretty well in line as to how they're marketed.  A fast, comfortable set up that can keep you comfortable for a stretch of nasty weather.  Also had on my old Pearl Izumi shoe covers, and while they kept my feet warmer and dryer than nothing, they also would have failed me completely over a longer stretch of time.  One thing I really felt was walking in my driveway (which had some wet snow on it) after the ride was done.  I could literally feel the slush push up through the air vents in the bottom of my road shoes.  I will definitely be sealing my mtn shoes before LandRun!
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #9 
clarksonxc how do you figure on sealing the bottom of your mt. bike shoes to keep the cold out?

Thanks
Zman

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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AlanEsh

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurichman
clarksonxc how do you figure on sealing the bottom of your mt. bike shoes to keep the cold out?

Thanks
Zman

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clarksonxc

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Reply with quote  #11 
The "fix" I saw was taping the air vents in the sole from the inside.  So leave the cleat installed, take out the insole and then cover any openings in the bottom.  I am not sure why there are holes to begin with - the cleat area is obvious, but the other areas?  Maybe so water can drain, or air venting?  Either way, I don't think it helps as much as it could hurt if your feet got re-soaked with cold water every time you had to hop off the bike.  I'll post pics if I find anything of note.
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Slim

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Reply with quote  #12 
‘Rainwear’ is a broad category.

Ask yourself some of the following questions:

What kind of fit are you looking for? As aero as possible or more ‘alpine fit’?

Is it for commuting or other rides?

How long are the rides where you will be wearing it?

How hard will you be working/how warm is it?


All of those things lead to different choices. It’s it’s a short hard ride, you might choose more water repellent rather than full waterproof gear.
If it’s for commuting it might have to fit over regular clothes.
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tomasumter

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Reply with quote  #13 
I just became a convert to toe and hand warmers. Why suffer?

You have the ShakeDry, so you really should be set up top. I usually pack an OR waterproof shell in my pack that does not leak, but also has no venting/breathability. Its small and packable so I can dress for the temp, and have a way to keep the chell away.  I may have a rain jersey and vest on underneath. I rarely do anything special for my legs, most bib tights seem to work freat. Feet: I have waterproof socks that I wear occasionally, but I also love me some Wooly Boolies. Even though I use Gore booties my feet will get cold even if they're not soaked. That's where toe warmers come in handy. Gloves: I am a big fan of the Serius Hyperlite All-Weather glove ($35 at REI) I'm on my third pair. I keep a lobster outer shell in my pack that has saved my bacon more than once. When the clouds open, I cover my hands, body and head with an outer shell. I am able to ride year round in the Pacific Northwest and not suffer too greatly. I hope that helps.
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RobF

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Reply with quote  #14 

 

I stayed warm & dry at Land Run last year when others were dropping from hypothermia, mostly due to socks & jacket.  The same jacket got me through the thunderstorm at Kanza last year.

1) Socks - The Showers Pass socks someone else mentioned. I don't like the way they feel on my skin, so I wore a thin pair of cycling socks underneath them. Hours of rain, muddy hike-a-bike, & walking a water crossing... my feet stayed dry & warm.

2) Jacket - The awesome (but expensive) Mission Workshop  Orion.  I held my breath when I bought it, but it's been worth it.  It breaths really well... with it zipped up my torso arms & head stayed bone dry in downpours without turning into a sauna on the inside.  The removable hood is shaped to fit over a helmet while riding, with a little brim to keep runoff off your face.  It's pretty tough; I cleaned it by hand after Land Run and it shows no signs of wear from that nasty red mud.  Cut long in the back and with little loops to hook your thumbs it kept water from sneaking in at the cuffs and butt.

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Slim

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Reply with quote  #15 
I quit partway in at Almanzo last year,(39, wind and constant rain) due mostly to cold from being wet and cold. (Also due to the fact that I was going to slow ;-).

There is a big difference between a 1 or 2 hour ride and a 8 hour ride. I was comfy and warm for the first 2 hours, uncomfortable and chilly for the 3rd hour and after 4 hours I had frozen hands and feet and was heading towards hypothermia.

This is caused by 2 things: Slowly, over time, water makes it’s way in. Along ankles, wrists and neck, it slowly seeps and wicks in. If any part is not 100% waterproof, it will also soak through after a long time, where it would be fine for a short ride.

The other part is your conditioning: The shorter the ride and the better shape you are in, the more power you can sustain, the warmer you will be.

My biggest issue was cold feet. I have long legs and skinny ankles, so there is often a gap between shoe covers and tights. I will try the Velotoze tall they are both taller than most, and seal around the ankle well. Other good ones for tall people might be the Spatz Pro:

https://roadcyclinguk.com/gear/reviews/accessories/cycling-shoe-covers/spatz-pro-overshoes-review.html#D6s3EX3hi48xzQFv.97

The other big issue was my hands. I wore fully waterproof GTX mittens, but every time I took my mittens off to do somehting (fix stuck derailleur from the mud, eat, operate computer, adjust zippers, swap que sheets) my wet hands would bring water into the mitten, so after a few hours the waterproof mittens were soaking wet inside.

For that reason, on long wet rides like that, I will go for neoprene (wetsuit) gloves from now on.

I will bring extra warm clothes to add if I get cold, as well as use the hand warmers sooner.

I am considered using waterproof MTB shorts over Softshell bibs. The Softshell bibs did fairly well on their own last year, but for if I had stayed out longer, my butt and crotch would have gotten wet, this would contribute to hypothermia. The shorts seem like a good way to keep core temperature up while being easy to take on and off.


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Slim

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Reply with quote  #16 
Bontrager Stormshell bib tight is the only waterproof pant/bib that I know of, made in stretch fabric and with a trim, tights-style fit.

So if you will be out long enough, or riding slow enough that Softshell etc won’t cut it, these are the only option I know of for full waterproof protection. They would have been awesome for somehting like last years Almanzo, 7-10 hours in continuous rain for most people.

Unfortunately they seem to be discontinuing it. The advantage is that if you can find your size, they are marked down.

http://road.cc/content/review/179277-bontrager-velocis-stormshell-bib-tight
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobF

 

 

1) Socks - The Showers Pass socks someone else mentioned. I don't like the way they feel on my skin, so I wore a thin pair of cycling socks underneath them. Hours of rain, muddy hike-a-bike, & walking a water crossing... my feet stayed dry & warm.

RobF Are you saying that the Showers Pass socks are waterproof. I thought I read some reviews on them where people said they weren't. I have their 2.0 Rain jacket or whatever their most expensive jacket and it saved my bacon on the Cascades 1200k ride.

How does anybody keep their legs warm and what kind of rain pants does everybody wear?

Thanks
Zman


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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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