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DerekJ_MI

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Reply with quote  #1 
I want to upgrade my riding in the rain gear.  I'm looking for recommendations on what works good.  I'm looking at everything including jackets, pants, gloves, booties maybe even helmet covers.  Obviously money matters but it's go to work!  So it that means several hundred for a jacket cause it works then so be it.  I have less expensive stuff that is supposed to work but doesn't.  At least not in continuous downpours during century rides.

Thanks,
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #2 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DerekJ_MI
I want to upgrade my riding in the rain gear.  I'm looking for recommendations on what works good.  I'm looking at everything including jackets, pants, gloves, booties maybe even helmet covers.  Obviously money matters but it's go to work!  So it that means several hundred for a jacket cause it works then so be it.  I have less expensive stuff that is supposed to work but doesn't.  At least not in continuous downpours during century rides.

Thanks,


Derek I really like the Showers Pass rain gear. It is manufactured in Oregon/Washington state where they get no rain. lol The 2.0 if I remember right is the heavy jacket. It breathes very well and you won't get sweaty or clammy and best part of it you will stay dry forever.. Their lightweight summer weight isn't as breathable and yes you will get clammy inside because it doesn't breath very well. I have not tried their gortex gloves yet or gortex socks but I have read good things about them. Western Bike has the 2.0 jacket on sale at times but figure around $200 for it. Bike Gore also makes good stuff and JOM over at gravel cyclist did a review on one of their rain jackets.

Derek I looked it up and it is the Elite 2.1 and at Western Bike Works right now it is $244. The Showers Pass for me at least runs true to size has adjustable long cuffs and pit zips to adjust the heat. I guess it depends on whether you are a cold or warmer rider as to the temps for this jacket but for me this jacket works good in the 55 deg. F down to 30 deg. F range. Where it really shines for me though when you are dead tired which I was on the Cascades 1200k and now 50 deg. F feels like 30-40 deg. F the jacket just flat out keep me toastie warm and that is what I am looking for/need in a rain jacket. It also has a longer tail on it which would help you gravel riding from the water getting slung up on your backside. On the Bike Gore line it has always fit me about 1 sizing too small. There is a review on the Bike Gore rain jacket over at Gravelcyclist by JOM. 


Good luck I hope this helps.
Zman

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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mr_slow

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Reply with quote  #3 
I've been riding some Gore Bike Wear pants for 7 or so years, they've lasted and they work. The only annoying thing, the storage pocket zipper can cause some discomfort if using a large backpack, but other than that, they're great. 

I also bought some Showers Pass waterproof socks, which are kind of neat, but they fit very odd, and don't seem to truly work... so maybe avoid them and go for a good waterproof shoe cover, as those have served me quite well, I have some "cheap" Pearl Izumi covers, and they've been solid. 

As for jackets, I've never found a good one weather type fits all. In Colorado we get a lot of cold rain, and some summer warm rain, which is why I've ended up with several rain jackets. For the summer, I use a very light, very pack-able Craft rain "cape", I've used it for cold rain as well, but it lets me know I choose incorrectly. For colder days, I have a Mavic rain coat, but it gets hot very quickly if the temps start to exceed 45-50F. And for really cold (usually best with snow), I use the 3-in-1 Pearl Izumi jacket, that thing is good between -10F (no rain) up to 35. 

I think if you take Zman's advice and get stuff from Gore or Showers Pass, you won't go wrong, since thats what those two companies are all about. 

Cheers!
Greg
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bobknh

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Reply with quote  #4 
My $.02: Perhaps the best investment for rainy weather riding is a good set of fenders for your bike. Hopefully your bike has fender mounts. If not, there are usually ways to retro fit them. The main issue you may run into is tire clearance; but a good set of fenders can make a huge difference in comfort and safety in wet weather. I usually avoid riding in wet weather, but if our New England dirt roads are muddy - especially in the Spring mud season, I use a plastic rear fender which clips onto my seat post: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B000X61N2A/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1
This plastic fender is easy to install and remove without tools, and does a reasonable job of preventing mud and water spraying down my back. Although it designed for 26" mountain bike wheels, it works equally well on 700C gravel wheels. But, nothing beats a good set of hammered alu. full coverage fenders. If you scroll down through Jan Heine's blog, you'll find an interesting article on fenders:
https://janheine.wordpress.com
Jan is a controversial guy with very strong opinions - some of which I don't agree with. But, at least he tries to test the ideas he advocates. And I tend to agree with his claims about the benefits of full Alu. fenders.
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clarksonxc

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Reply with quote  #5 
With LandRun coming up I am starting to take a more serious approach to this as well.  Some items I can review; others I literally just received so I don't have any real thoughts on yet.  Everything I purchased was researched to some degree as to what would actually work for my needs.

Hat:  Got a Gore-Tex thermal cycling cap from Swrve.  Not sure if they make it anymore, but it has proven itself many times over.

Jacket:  Gore-Tex 1985 Shakedry direct from Gore-Tex.  Very pricey, but recommended by Nick Legan.  This jacket is very well outfitted (fit, cuffs, collar, etc) and I am very happy with it.  My previous jacket was the Twin Six rain coat, which worked well, but it didn't have the insulation quality that I was looking for to combat against a cold, constant rain.

Gloves:  Aerostitch Gauntlet.  These were also suggested by Nick, and while I should've sized down (bought the Large instead of Medium), they have worked great as well.  They are the "lobster" type with two fingers grouped together, but other than that I cannot complain.  I got some neoprene ones as a backup from a local outdoors store, I will try them out as well (they pass the faucet test).

Pants:  I have not tested any of these yet, but I recently purchased the Pactimo Storm+ 12hr bibs and leg warmers, Castelli Polare 2 bibtight, and Showers Pass Transit pant.  After trying everything on I feel like they they would be best suited for wet-wetter-wettest in that order.  I can't imagine riding the entirety of LandRun in the Transit Pants, but if it's 38 and raining the whole way it might be the only way to survive.

Feet:  I did not want to buy any special rain or winter specific shoes or boots, so I decided to layer on both sides of my current shoes.  I got the Showers Pass waterproof socks, and while they are fairly bulky (not a normal cycling sock fit, even compared to heavier wool thermal socks) they fit in my shoes with some effort.  I also got a set of Endura mtn overshoes, which are mostly neoprene and very sturdy.  Nick suggested the Velotoze rubber overshoes, which are very nice, but I don't think they'd survive 9 miles of walking in Oklahoma.  

With all of that said; in the most extreme circumstances I now have gear that would last a 100mi cold deluge.  It won't be comfortable (it never is), and it wasn't cheap, but if it means the difference between a finish and a DNF it's worth it.  More to come if I get some rain miles in the following weeks.
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by clarksonxc
With LandRun coming up I am starting to take a more serious approach to this as well.  Some items I can review; others I literally just received so I don't have any real thoughts on yet.  Everything I purchased was researched to some degree as to what would actually work for my needs.

Hat:  Got a Gore-Tex thermal cycling cap from Swrve.  Not sure if they make it anymore, but it has proven itself many times over.

Jacket:  Gore-Tex 1985 Shakedry direct from Gore-Tex.  Very pricey, but recommended by Nick Legan.  This jacket is very well outfitted (fit, cuffs, collar, etc) and I am very happy with it.  My previous jacket was the Twin Six rain coat, which worked well, but it didn't have the insulation quality that I was looking for to combat against a cold, constant rain.

Gloves:  Aerostitch Gauntlet.  These were also suggested by Nick, and while I should've sized down (bought the Large instead of Medium), they have worked great as well.  They are the "lobster" type with two fingers grouped together, but other than that I cannot complain.  I got some neoprene ones as a backup from a local outdoors store, I will try them out as well (they pass the faucet test).

Pants:  I have not tested any of these yet, but I recently purchased the Pactimo Storm+ 12hr bibs and leg warmers, Castelli Polare 2 bibtight, and Showers Pass Transit pant.  After trying everything on I feel like they they would be best suited for wet-wetter-wettest in that order.  I can't imagine riding the entirety of LandRun in the Transit Pants, but if it's 38 and raining the whole way it might be the only way to survive.

Feet:  I did not want to buy any special rain or winter specific shoes or boots, so I decided to layer on both sides of my current shoes.  I got the Showers Pass waterproof socks, and while they are fairly bulky (not a normal cycling sock fit, even compared to heavier wool thermal socks) they fit in my shoes with some effort.  I also got a set of Endura mtn overshoes, which are mostly neoprene and very sturdy.  Nick suggested the Velotoze rubber overshoes, which are very nice, but I don't think they'd survive 9 miles of walking in Oklahoma.  

With all of that said; in the most extreme circumstances I now have gear that would last a 100mi cold deluge.  It won't be comfortable (it never is), and it wasn't cheap, but if it means the difference between a finish and a DNF it's worth it.  More to come if I get some rain miles in the following weeks.


read all the things you bought. I have a big time problem getting cycling shoes to fit because my left foot is about 1/2 size bigger. So yeah I have lots of experience getting hot feet which then leads to numbness in your feet which after awhile will make you get off the bike. Those goretex socks that was a tight fit IMHO will cause that. You might want to try them out before you try them in that race. I got a hot foot so bad in one race I had to withdraw so don't want to see that happening to you.

Good luck
Zman

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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DerekJ_MI

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Reply with quote  #7 
thanks for the tips.  I'm looking into several suggestions.
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clarksonxc

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Reply with quote  #8 
Can report on the Castelli Perfetto long sleeve jersey and Castelli Polare 2 bibtights from a ride this weekend.  It started out mid-40's, sunny and calm, and I was downright warm.  Maybe even overdressed.  Then about 2hrs in it started to rain and the temperature dropped to mid-30's.  While the Castelli gear held up well for those conditions, I could tell that they were not meant to survive an entire day like that.  Any more than a few hours like that and I think you'd have a very unpleasant experience.  So, they performed pretty well in line as to how they're marketed.  A fast, comfortable set up that can keep you comfortable for a stretch of nasty weather.  Also had on my old Pearl Izumi shoe covers, and while they kept my feet warmer and dryer than nothing, they also would have failed me completely over a longer stretch of time.  One thing I really felt was walking in my driveway (which had some wet snow on it) after the ride was done.  I could literally feel the slush push up through the air vents in the bottom of my road shoes.  I will definitely be sealing my mtn shoes before LandRun!
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #9 
clarksonxc how do you figure on sealing the bottom of your mt. bike shoes to keep the cold out?

Thanks
Zman

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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AlanEsh

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurichman
clarksonxc how do you figure on sealing the bottom of your mt. bike shoes to keep the cold out?

Thanks
Zman

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clarksonxc

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Reply with quote  #11 
The "fix" I saw was taping the air vents in the sole from the inside.  So leave the cleat installed, take out the insole and then cover any openings in the bottom.  I am not sure why there are holes to begin with - the cleat area is obvious, but the other areas?  Maybe so water can drain, or air venting?  Either way, I don't think it helps as much as it could hurt if your feet got re-soaked with cold water every time you had to hop off the bike.  I'll post pics if I find anything of note.
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