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Soundwave

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi guys!

I've been doing a lot of research into the 40-45mm tires, and I have narrowed the field down to a few I like.  My bike has 35mm Schwalbe G-Ones, which are great, but for some rides around here I would prefer tires with a bit more cushion.  I would also like a tire that I can use for road riding and commuting without feeling too sluggish (changing tubeless tires is something I want to do between seasons, not between rides). 

Here are the ones I've been looking at, please feel free to offer other suggestions as well:

-Terrene Elwood.  Reviews here specifically mention it being a good pavement tire.  A little on the spendy side.

-Arisun Gravel Plus 40.  The most unknown to me, but supposedly good durability.  The price is the best of the group.

WTB Riddler.  I know WTB Nanos and I like them.  Likely easy to mount and widest of the group.

-Clement X'plor MSO.  I also like Clement tires, but I have concerns about their durability if pavement is involved.

Each pretty much has pros and cons, so I was hoping some folks could shed some light on these with first-hand knowledge.  Arisun sounds like a good bet but it's hard to find much information on this new brand.  By the way, width is not an issue for any of these, my frame can handle about 45mm comfortably.
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bobknh

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Reply with quote  #2 
You might want to add the Compass Snoqualamine to your list. I've been riding the Bon Jon's - the little brother of the Snowqualamine - on everything I can throw at them from high speed group rides on pavement, to chopped up dirt and gravel roads here in NH's mud season. Here is the link to the Compass site: https://www.compasscycle.com/shop/components/tires/700c/compass-700c-x-44-snoqualmie-pass/

One word of caution about the Snoqualamine: if you plan to set these up tubeless, I would recommend buying the "standard" weight instead of the "ultra light" version. There is another thread which discusses issues with the tubeless setup of the Bob Jon's ultra light version. I haven't done a tubeless set up on my Bon Jon's yet. But I've been running them at 40/35 PSI with Schwalbe light tubes with very good performance, and no problems with pinch flats, or sidewall damage. I may use Challenge latex tubes instead of tubeless on these. 
I've become a big fan of Compass tires which are hand made for Compass in Japan by Panaracer. You can read more about how Compass tires are made in Bicycle Quarterly - the sister company of Compass: https://janheine.wordpress.com/2017/03/08/panaracer-hand-made-tires/
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RoverAl

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Reply with quote  #3 
Specialized Sawtooth 42c it's a chill tire that rolls fast. I have about 200 miles on my set and have taken them on a little of everything. Dropped the PSI to 35-40 and it's very smooth. I just really like them and will keep them on for most everything unless I hit up a charity ride.  Here is a link with my impressions.http://ridinggravel.com/forum/?p=post%2Fspecialized-sawtooth-tires-8465726   Price is right too. 


IMG_20170416_090504.jpg

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ronpal

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Reply with quote  #4 
I have the Challenge Gravel Grinder Race 700x38 and I find they roll really well on pavement.  I also have the Riddlers 700x45 and am disappoint on how they roll on pavement, they felt slower then the Challenge.  This was all subjective feel, but the Riddlers are significantly heavier which was very noticeable when accelerating from a stop.  But even rolling I find them slower then the challenge when on pavement.  Interestingly on gravel I do not notice much difference in rolling resistance, and the lower pressure that I run in the riddlers gives a great ride.  I run challenge latex tubes in all of my tires.   
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bikermike

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Reply with quote  #5 
I just recently put the snoqualmie pass standard casing on my specialized sequoia and I'm loving them so far. Have only had a chance to do 10 miles mixed pavement sand ride on them. I switched from the specialized sawtooth and lost over 8 ounces per tire. That right there makes a huge difference in how a bike rolls. Yes the sawtooth is a heavy duty and compass tires as a rule are not but unless you are riding where there is a lot of sharp rock I think you'll be fine. Tubeless setup was a cinch. 3 ounces of orange seal and my air compressor and they inflated right up. Had to add air about 3 times over the next 24 hours but now they seem to be doing great. Overall I would recommend these for normal hardpack sand pavement and gravel if the gravel isn't real sharp.
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Soundwave

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thank you for all the replies so far!

Compass tires are on my radar, but I feel a little pushed away by the price and by the tubeless-ness of them.  They claim to be tubeless but I've heard conflicting reports about sidewall leakage (mostly on but not limited to the extralight versions).  Durability is also a concern: my G-Ones already have noticeable wear and they weight about double what the Snoqualmie Pass does.

Specialized Sawtooth:  I was not aware of this at all, and it looks like a great option.  Thank you for bringing it to my attention.

Challenge Gravel Grinder 38: Looks like a great tire with a diverse tread pattern, but it's just not big enough for what I'm looking for.  The G-Ones are also available in 38mm otherwise I would just get those, but I'm looking for something that a) makes full use of available clearance, and b) is tubeless.  I should have specified those to begin with.  Thank you though!

The good news is I have some time to digest any options:  unfortunately the rain is still falling in Oregon so I need to keep those fenders on!
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bikermike

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Reply with quote  #7 
I can understand your concerns on the compass. I had a few myself but could not find enough info really either way to make a decision. So I figured I'd buy them and find out first hand! Coming from over 600 gram tire it really is amazing how much snappier my bike feels. One thing I might mention is I'm not too concerned if they wear out a little quicker as long as i don't have lots of flats or sidewall seepage or the like. I'll keep you guys posted if I have any issues.
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owly

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Reply with quote  #8 
Just released WTB Byway 47mm. Smooth centre with very small/low side knobs. 

Weight may be a con for you at 530gm.
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bobknh

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by owly
Just released WTB Byway 47mm. Smooth centre with very small/low side knobs. 

Weight may be a con for you at 530gm.

is this a 650B, or a 700 C tire? Saw some news about these on Gravel Cyclist -- but they were 650 B's. Not sure if it's worth buying a new bike to get on the 650 B band wagon. If I were shopping for a new ride though, dual 700c, 650b compatibility would be something to consider!
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ridemagnetic

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Reply with quote  #10 
Byway is 650b.. Looks great though, proper gravel tire for road plus.

https://www.wtb.com/products/byway

https://www.bikerumor.com/2017/04/20/wtb-takes-byway-new-dirt-ready-47mm-road-plus-tire/

http://ridinggravel.com/components/wtb-byway-650b-x-47-tires-getting-rolling/


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No Mojo

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Reply with quote  #11 

I have the Clement X’plor MSO on my Overland and they roll great on pavement and hardpack however I can’t speak of durability as I only have about 200 miles on them.


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TheRo0sTer

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Reply with quote  #12 
For wear and longevity you can't beat the Schwalbe Mondial. 
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goneskiian

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Reply with quote  #13 
Another plug for the Compass Snoqualmie Pass 44's here. I rode them quite a bit last fall into and after a local gran fondo (in Winthrop WA). They were the standard casing version and they performed very well. I set them up tubeless with ~2 oz. of Orange seal (standard version) on Roval Control Carbon CX wheels. They were the wheels that came stock on the Crux Pro Race I was riding at the time (since sold) and the rim profile looked exactly like their mtb Control Carbon wheel with 22mm internal width. I did use the "lay the wheels flat" method of making sure the sealant sat on both sides of the sidewalls for a few hours each (Overnight? Maybe. I don't recall now). 

The course included some pretty nasty descents (which is why the promoter recommended 40+ tires) with a bunch of imbedded rocks and a couple sections where the local DNR folks had recently graded the roads and pulled up a bunch of the rocks. I may not have had quite enough air in them (35 - 40 psi if memory serves) for these sections (or I was just going too damn fast, which is more likely the case), and I did end up bottoming them out on the rims. I don't know if this is what cause them both to start losing air but a quick stop, shake and top up with C02 (yes, I've learned not to do this) seemed to stop the bleeding. Although, my rear did seem to be pretty soft by the finish it never went completely flat but did go all the way flat by the next morning.

When I pulled them off a week later or so I found multiple very small holes and one large enough to patch that the sealant had sealed.

Was this too fragile a tire for this event? Perhaps. But I finished with no total flats while many others ran through all their tubes and had to borrow more. I probably should have just slowed way down in those really nasty bits and they would have been fine.

I love these tires.

Cheers!
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NoCoGreg

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Reply with quote  #14 
+1 for the Clement MSO's.  It took a while for the 40's to actually stretch to 39.5mm. I'm running them on narrow (19mm outside width)  Mavic XCP33 rims.  When I first mounted the MSO's they were a bit under 38mm. 

Despite running the MSO's with tubes I'm very pleased with the ride.  The wear depends so much on one's power, weight, riding style and terrain that IMO it's going to be very difficult to predict longevity of the tire.  The tread of the MSO's are holding up much better than most all of the CX tires I've ridden so I'm a happy customer.

I've got a Challenge 38mm ready to mount when the rear MSO wears a bit more...

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