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JWB475

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Reply with quote  #1 
I picked a Bish Bash Bosh from Planet-X (56).  I really liked the geometry, as it was very similar to my GT Grade Alloy X (58), which I find very comfortable and fits me well.  In addition the full carbon construction and clearance for 40mm tires really peaked my interest.

And, well, when it went on sale I couldn't help myself - I had to have it.  Cost for the frameset and an extra derailleur hanger including shipping to the US was $535.

It arrived well packaged and the paint/finish was excellent.
20160825_175119.jpg 
This is the first bike I have built up and while it was a learning experience everything came together well.  Nearly all of the components from my GT Grade swapped over (Shimano 105, RS685 Brifters, Hydro Brakes).  Weight including pedals dropped a few pounds from ~23lbs on the Grade to ~19.5lbs on the BBB.

I have only ridden it on a few short rides, but the carbon frame certainly seems to dampen the bumps, and the few pounds of weight seem to make a big difference on some of the climbs I have been on.  

Thus far I am quite pleased with it, and I am really I look forward to putting some miles on this bike.

20160831_072502.jpg 
   20160831_072457.jpg  20160831_072453.jpg 






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rocthrower

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Reply with quote  #2 
Very nice looking build!  I like the looks of that color; some of the other options are a little "loud" for me.  Did the frame come with the front and rear thru-axles or did you have to supply those yourself?
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JWB475

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Reply with quote  #3 
The frame shipped with the thru-axles (15x100/12x142).  It also came with a second set of plugs for the internal cable routing to accommodate electronic group sets.  I did not come with anything else though (no headset).

I actually kind of liked the lime green bike, but the grey color was the only one on sale in my size.  The grey is more my style though...

Although the geometry is very close to the GT Grade, the handling seems much better on the BBB which I was not expecting.  It has a bit longer wheelbase, a little more bottom bracket drop, and a bit more fork rake/offset.  Still getting the fit dialed in, but so far I really like it.  

It seems to have about 50mm tire clearance at the chainstays, more than the GT Grade, but I was hoping for a bit more (63mm at the fork and seat stays).
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DrSpoke

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Reply with quote  #4 
That looks like a very nice bike - and a great price.
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Nubster

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Reply with quote  #5 
I was eyeing them but I wanted a single speed option. No dice. Great looking bikes though.
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honda0059

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Reply with quote  #6 
Hi, Nice looking bike, and one that I seriously considering for my riding in Australia.

The only thing that's holding me back is that I would like to run a slightly wider tire than the suggested 40mm and I was wondering if the WTB Horizon tire (650b x 47c) would fit. From the pictures I've seen I think the main concern would be with the clearance on the chainstays. Do you think the WTB Horizon may fit?
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JWB475

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Reply with quote  #7 
I think a 650B x 47 would be a pretty tight squeeze.  

I measured the chainstays again and there is ~48mm of clearance at the widest point for my current tire (Panaracer Gravel King 700x32 non sk), probably only ~52 mm if you used a 650B wheel.   

Even a 700 x 40 will be tight depending on the tire.  Pretty disappointing because there is gobs of clearance everywhere else.   Grit CX just posted a more recent review, they also mention the tire clearance as they had some rub with a 40mm WTB Nano in light mud.

http://grit.cx/reviews/rated-on-one-bish-bash-bosh-graveladventure-bike

I ordered a set of Panaracer Gravel King 700 x 35 SK's and will be installing them this weekend.   I will measure the chainstays again once I do and post the results.

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honda0059

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Reply with quote  #8 
Following on from Guitar Teds suggestion in his comparison of 650b vs 700c could you measure the width between the chainstays approx 34.13cm from the centre of the rear axle. That should provide a good idea of what size 650B tyre can fit in the Bish Bash Bosh. Many thanks.
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bobknh

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Reply with quote  #9 
On-One Bish Bash Bosh -- was curious and went to their web-site. Prices are amazing. Yet, one thing I've learned in life is that if something is too good to be true, then it probably isn't! For example, there are lots of dubious sites and companies in the Far East selling knock-off carbon frames and bike components. They look great, but on closer inspection by experts, they turn out to be inferior, and even dangerous, copies made by dishonest fly by night manufacturers. Can someone, who has dealt with On-one for a long time give me some evidence that this company is legit?
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JWB475

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Reply with quote  #10 
I would say they are the UK equivalent of bikesdirect.com in the US, but with a better marketing scheme and actual retail stores. They have been around since the 1990s. I guess don't know what evidence you need.
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jmart

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Reply with quote  #11 
Great looking bike.  Someone asked about On One, they are a bike manufacturer based in England.  I have an On One Pompino (Google Pompino sometime when you're wife's not around)  single speed for about 3 years and have had no issues with it.  Nice steel frame with a smooth ride.  On One purchased Titus around 2007 which was founded by Chris Cocalis who went on to start up Pivot. 
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JWB475

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Reply with quote  #12 
I don't have my calipers with me to measure the width and clearance right now, but here is the clearance with the 700 x 35 Panaracer Gravelking SK @45 psi...

Attached Images
jpeg 20160917_090520.jpg (1.92 MB, 72 views)

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bobknh

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JWB475
I would say they are the UK equivalent of bikesdirect.com in the US, but with a better marketing scheme and actual retail stores. They have been around since the 1990s. I guess don't know what evidence you need.

Thanks. That's good evidence for starters; but the gold standard would be testing by some outfit like Velonews, with serious lab test equipment, or the equivalent type of lab in Europe, testing their frames and components for durability and safety. I saw some very disturbing tests done awhile ago on some no-name bike frames and forks which looked very much like high end products from Specialized and Pinarello, and the products showed significant weakness and lack of durability compared to the real deal from reputable manufacturers. I guess, it's a personal choice. But I'm still skeptical. The prices are just too low. for myself, until I see some objective testing done by a respectable lab, I'll stick with name brands. 
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honda0059

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Reply with quote  #14 
Thanks for the photo showing the chainstay clearance. It looks like the 35 gravelkings are a great fit
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JWB475

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Reply with quote  #15 
Are you referring to this study? http://velonews.competitor.com/not-all-frames-are-created-equal-a-look-deep-inside-the-carbon-in-counterfeit-bikes

These are not knock offs or counterfeit bikes. There have been plenty of reviews of on-one and planet-x bikes on countless reputable websites.

Not to mention Chris Plesko just rode an On-One bike to a new single speed record on the Tour Divide...

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobknh

Thanks. That's good evidence for starters; but the gold standard would be testing by some outfit like Velonews, with serious lab test equipment, or the equivalent type of lab in Europe, testing their frames and components for durability and safety. I saw some very disturbing tests done awhile ago on some no-name bike frames and forks which looked very much like high end products from Specialized and Pinarello, and the products showed significant weakness and lack of durability compared to the real deal from reputable manufacturers. I guess, it's a personal choice. But I'm still skeptical. The prices are just too low. for myself, until I see some objective testing done by a respectable lab, I'll stick with name brands. 
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JWB475

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Reply with quote  #16 
I'm guessing (hoping) they are closer to 38mm than 35mm, either way they should be a great tire.

Quote:
Originally Posted by honda0059
Thanks for the photo showing the chainstay clearance. It looks like the 35 gravelkings are a great fit
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bobknh

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JWB475
Are you referring to this study? http://velonews.competitor.com/not-all-frames-are-created-equal-a-look-deep-inside-the-carbon-in-counterfeit-bikes These are not knock offs or counterfeit bikes. There have been plenty of reviews of on-one and planet-x bikes on countless reputable websites. Not to mention Chris Plesko just rode an On-One bike to a new single speed record on the Tour Divide...

Thanks. Yes. That was the VN article. While the article focused on deliberate counterfeit bikes, I've also seen a lot of knock-off components and bikes with very dubious manufacturing provenance. My take away from the VN report was "Caveat Emptor" when considering bike "bargains". This is especially true with carbon frames and components. It's very hard to tell what is really under the shiny paint. A full carbon frame and fork for under $600? To me, that raises a red flag. Personally, I wouldn't take the risk. But short of lab test data similar to the work done by VN in Boulder on bikes they review, you make a strong case for On-one. 


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JWB475

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Reply with quote  #18 
I measured the clearance and width of the tires this morning.

The 700x35 Panaracer Grave King SK measured out to nearly 38 mm at 40 psi on my rims (DT Swiss Spline 32, 18mm internal width).
20160919_072951.jpg      
The chainstay width was ~50 mm at the widest point of the tire which was 13.25 inches or 33.66 cm from the axle.

20160919_072440.jpg 

Here are my measurements:
13.25 in / 33.7 cm = 50 mm
13 in / 33 cm = 51.5 mm 
12.75 in / 32.4 cm = 53 mm
12.5 in / 31.75 cm = 55 mm
12.25 in / 31.1 cm = 57 mm
12 in / 30.5 cm = 59 mm

Bruce Gordon's website (http://www.bgcycles.com/) has a drawing that illustrates how much clearance his 650b x 43 Rock N' Road tire requires.  According to him his tire is 44mm wide at 32.5 cm from the center of the axle (actual radius is 35.7 cm).   Based on that the BBB would have ~9mm of clearance using that combo (he recommends 12 mm of clearance).  So it seems that size tire/wheel combo would likely fit in this frame, but not much more.   




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pt1xoom

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Reply with quote  #19 
I am currently building a bike with one of these frames.  

On the above photo, I noticed you covered the cable under the bottom bracket.  What did you use the cover the cables?  Would you be so kind to take a better picture of the cable routing under the bottom bracket?

Thanks you.
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JWB475

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Reply with quote  #20 
The cables themselves are protected by the inner housing supplied with the Jagwire kit, but to keep gunk and grime out of the area I put a piece of frame tape over it.  It really isn't necessary since the cables are protected.  If you do this keep in mind that if you ride in wet areas that water likely will collect in this area.  I have since put a small a hole in it to allow water to drain.

I ran the inner housing first, then slid the cables through the housing.  It was a little tricky routing it through the bottom bracket and to the rear derailleur, but not bad (maybe I got lucky).

20160917_090520.jpg 

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oleritter

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Reply with quote  #21 
I think there is an important difference between carbon frame "knock off's" and carbon frames made in Asia or China.  With knock offs, fraud is intentional, so why would or should quality be adhered to?  

Most carbon frames are now made in China and Taiwan.  All the brands we know, and all the other ones we don't, and in the same factories.  An unbranded or unfamiliar brand doesn't have to be suspect.  Our big, trusted brands have had plenty of failures and warranty claims.  Don't forget when you buy your bike or frame, that you are paying for marketing, advertising, rent, insurance, employee benefits, lawyers, yada yada.  This is where the real price difference lies.

Planet X/On one offers 2 year warranty and crash replacement discount, also.  My .02.

Also, except for direct sales, I'd put them in a different class than Bikes Direct.

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jmart

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Reply with quote  #22 
I think On One is a good brand.  I have had a Pompino (single speed, steel, cross bike) that I have used for my urban bike for several years.    The ride is great,  workmanship is great,  company is great to deal with.  I really like their bikes and a lot of their bikes seem to hit the niche markets that a lot of the other manufacturers are just now starting to explore.   They always have good deals.   
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bobknh

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Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oleritter
I think there is an important difference between carbon frame "knock off's" and carbon frames made in Asia or China.  With knock offs, fraud is intentional, so why would or should quality be adhered to?  

Most carbon frames are now made in China and Taiwan.  All the brands we know, and all the other ones we don't, and in the same factories.  An unbranded or unfamiliar brand doesn't have to be suspect.  Our big, trusted brands have had plenty of failures and warranty claims.  Don't forget when you buy your bike or frame, that you are paying for marketing, advertising, rent, insurance, employee benefits, lawyers, yada yada.  This is where the real price difference lies.

Planet X/On one offers 2 year warranty and crash replacement discount, also.  My .02.

Also, except for direct sales, I'd put them in a different class than Bikes Direct.


I believe that most of what you say is correct - except the assumption that because a manufacturer isn't making a knock off, he will be more honest in making a no-name brand to be sold at a much lower price than his name brand products. My point earlier, is that without independent testing, you simply don't know what you are buying. Nor, for that matter, who you can seek damages from should a defective or substandard frame or fork fails, and causes serious injuries. Is paying a higher price for a name brand product worth it? Maybe not. But like they say in Rome - Caveat Emptor!
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pt1xoom

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Reply with quote  #24 
I have put 1000 miles on the bike so far, and I thought I would share my thoughts.

It took me a while to get the fit just right and to find the right saddle (Phenom Comp).  I am 5'9 3/4", so right at the line of a 52 cm and 54 cm.  I picked the 52 cm.  The frames seems to fit as I am able to take 3 or 4 hour rides without pain.  I am happy with the frame.

I did cover the cables with some housing, but I found the front derailleur housing filled up with junk and it froze the cable.  I was no longer able to change from the big gear to the small gear in the front.  So I replaced that cable and did not put any housing on the bottom.  I rode this weekend and had no cable issues.  The ride was on wet gravel roads.  The review below has a very good picture of the routing from the factory, and they do not put any housing on the cables.

I am using TRP HY/RD brakes.  The rear cable housing really needed to be compressionless housing.   I ran normal brake housing for the first three month, but the compressionless housing make a world of difference in the back.  I am happy with the brake performance in the front with normal brake cable housing.  I am having issue with the rear brake cables freeze when the temperature is below 30 degrees F.  I don't think that has anything to do with the frame; however, because you have to use cable housing from front to back, if there is any moisture in the housing, then it will freeze along the bottom.  On the frame, it is designed for a 140 mm rotor on the rear (the front is designed for 160).  You will need an adapter if you buy 160 mm rotor (like I did because their website said it takes 160).

Here is a more recent review.  http://www.cyclist.co.uk/reviews/2332/on-one-bish-bash-bosh-review
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oleritter

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Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by honda0059
Hi, Nice looking bike, and one that I seriously considering for my riding in Australia.

The only thing that's holding me back is that I would like to run a slightly wider tire than the suggested 40mm and I was wondering if the WTB Horizon tire (650b x 47c) would fit. From the pictures I've seen I think the main concern would be with the clearance on the chainstays. Do you think the WTB Horizon may fit?


I'm going to say 650b x 42 max giving you some mud clearance.  Don't think Horizon's will be a go, mate.


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