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z1r

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hope this is the right place to post this question.  I have a bike that currently has a wheelset with WTB I19 rims that I want to set up tubeless.

I know I need valve stems, rim tape, and sealant. What I'm unsure of is whether I need a rim strip to properly convert.

Help a noob out.

Tire, in case it matters, will probably be a Teravail Cannonball 700x35.  I have a set of 38's on my Cosmic Stallion and like the way they perform so far.
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DaveBarno

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Reply with quote  #2 
No rim strip needed, just wrap a couple of times with rim tape (tightly) and you should be good to go.

I just set up some WTB i19 rims with a single wrap of gorilla tape - holding strong, no problems.

From my experience the valve stem is the most common area for a leak, I've had good luck with cutting a thin strip or two of old tube, punching a whole, and sticking the valve stem through that before out the valve stem hole on the rim.

Also, after making a mess with the first couple sets of tires I converted, I've found that seating the bead without sealant, then deflating and inject sealant through the valve stem (core removed) is the only way to go.  Otherwise, expect to make a giant mess on your first attempts.
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z1r

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks, good advice and much appreciated, especially adding the sealant through the stem.
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nalax

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Reply with quote  #4 
i19's are pretty easy to set up tubeless. I have two in 700c and one in 650b - they are all easy to set up. Mine have two rolls of tape, various brands of valves and i like to use a Schwalbe Tire Booster to pump them up. Both Stan's and Orange Seal have worked for me.
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z1r

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nalax
i19's are pretty easy to set up tubeless. I have two in 700c and one in 650b - they are all easy to set up. Mine have two rolls of tape, various brands of valves and i like to use a Schwalbe Tire Booster to pump them up. Both Stan's and Orange Seal have worked for me.


So, what I'm hearing from various sources is that for higher pressure applications two layers of tape is recommended? Or do you feel that it should be used on both higher and low pressure applications?

I've got the Stan's valves, tape, and sealant on the way.
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nalax

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Reply with quote  #6 
Depends on what kind of tape you're using. Gorillla is thicker, stickier and stronger than Stans, so you don't need to double. I used another brand, don't remember who, but it was blue and thinner than Stans. It also ripped easily. Supposedly 4289 Tesa tape is the same as Stan's. I'm trying this next. Some tire/rim combinations benefit from more tape, some less. Currently my i19 have Byways, WTB Exposure and Clement MSO 36mm all with double Stan's. Sometimes I'll throw GP4000s on there with tubes. The 28mm's end up at a comfy 31mm.
This will take a little experimenting on your part. Good luck!
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dangle

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by z1r


So, what I'm hearing from various sources is that for higher pressure applications two layers of tape is recommended? Or do you feel that it should be used on both higher and low pressure applications?

I've got the Stan's valves, tape, and sealant on the way.


Stan's tape double wrapped will hold any pressure you would realistically use. Almost any rim tape double wrapped will hold any riding pressure. The one exception would be Scotch 8898 and 8896. They are thinner and I would double wrap for low pressure and triple wrap for high pressure (beyond ~60 psi) applications. They are a fraction of the cost of Stans and are easy to use. The only other thing I can think of is to look for burrs around spoke holes on aluminum rims before wrapping your tape. Sometimes the spokes holes aren't finished perfectly and a burr will pierce rim tape really easily.
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z1r

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Reply with quote  #8 
Thanks for all the advice, much appreciated.

My new bike came set up with tubeless tires.  Want to convert my old bike.  This has been very helpful.  One that one is converted, I have a rim brake bike that I want to convert but need a new wheelset.  That one can wait though.
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LewisQC

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Reply with quote  #9 
Lots of good advices... Here's some more though from my experience: if your tire is new, it helps to mount the tire with a tube for some time to stretch the bead (it can press on your tape as well for max adherence). Also removing the valve core to inflate can make a difference for bigger tires. I set my gravelking slick tubeless few weeks ago and I was pretty pissed off to notice, after I've injected my sealant, that these tire were directional... It took me 4 minutes to remove tire, turn it around and re-inflate, without losing a drop of sealant. So with good tire/rim combo, it's not that messy even with sealant on board...

But the trick with the small piece of tube is really the best one... Beside helping to reduce leaking mechanically, it also pushes the base of the valve inside the rim; on thin rim (like single wall fatbike rim) there's sometime not enough thread to tighten the valve nut properly
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panhndl

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Reply with quote  #10 
http://fattystripper.com

Buy skinny stripper 4/$20 and it makes the conversion easier. Put one wrap of tape on your rim, fill with whatever latex brand you choose, and you’re good. There are instructions and videos to help a person the first time.

I like them better than other method for clean up alone. It’s also a little easier. I would use scissors rather than a razor to trim off the excess. It isn’t as neat looking but I have sliced a tire before.

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GHC

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Reply with quote  #11 
If you like video's, search tubeless conversion and there are dozens that may help too.   

For example:


I am a proponent of using a squirt bottle with water and a little dish detergent to spray beads during install. 

My process (using tubeless ready tires) is to mount the tire and inflate first without sealant.  I use a high capacity tire pump or an air compressor with inner valve core out to aid first seal pop in.  (you can hold pressure with your finger with core out and then quickly re install/screw in without loosing seat)  Most/many tubeless tires have a thin rubber line that is just above the rim, inspect the line to make sure it's uniformly above the rim/fully seated.  Typically you hear them popping in.  Again, the mildly soapy water mix make initial bead seat easier. Many tubeless tires will hold air without sealant at initial install.  If they do, I leave them sit at relatively high pressure (within reason/not above max) for 10 minutes or so to stretch in before adding sealant.  (I also spray down the outside of the tire at this point with soapy water mix to make sure the sidewalls aren't leaking air (bubbles) .... if they are tubeless ready tires, they shouldn't be leaking through the sidewalls without sealant....if they are, take em back, it's not what you paid for.  The beads MIGHT leak a little without sealant, but again, the sidewalls should not be.)   Then hang the tire from the rim or on a rim holder (to keep pressure off the tire), take inner valve core out, install sealant through the valve, air up (or reseat if you lost it).   The first air up with sealant I use more air pressure (again within reason) then I typically ride. Then I do the side shake and side roll on both sides, and gentle tire bouncing all the way around..... and then I put em on and ride close to the shop on rough stuff (ride at your own risk, up to you).   Recheck pressure.  I ride them a little higher pressure the first couple outings and then reduce pressure after that to find the sweet spot or adjust for conditions. gtg.   There really is no right or wrong way....this is just my way ... bottom line the goal is to the rim clean and taped (if needed) and tire seated with sealant in...doesn't really matter how you get there.

Some tires can be harder to get initial bead seal then others.  If so, use an air compressor with core out for max air and keep it flowing.  Keep weight off the rubber, grab a friend, find where air is escaping and apply hand pressure to create tire/rim contact in those spots while max air flow .... you will know when you have it.....pressure will increase quickly, particularly using a compressor (careful here, once they start popping in slow your roll on the air flow, you don't want to blow them off the rim or damage tire or yourself for that matter).

hope this helps.    

bit of a learning curve, but it's worth it IMO if you ride rough stuff/want more compliance/want to run low pressure, and need flat protection.


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