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langdalek

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi everyone,
I am new to gravel riding and just picked up a pair of the Panaracer Gravel King SK's in 700x35c. I am going to mount them on my Bianchi San Jose SS but was wondering if I can mount them tubeless on my stock rims. I know I need to tape the rims and get different valve stems and add sealant, but was wondering if these tires are capable of setting up tubeless. There is a review on Amazon stating these tires needed the red letters "TRL" stamped on the side in order to be set up tubeless. Someone else said they ran the DK in these tires tubeless without any problems. Any suggestions before I toss my tubes and dive in? Thank you!

Kerry

Gravel King.jpg

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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #2 
Newbie here also but from I know you most of the time have to have tubeless rims that have a hook on them to grab the tire to set them up tubeless. That being said my 2016 Raleigh Tamland came with non tubeless tires. Clement 40 mm MSO's I was able to set the front up tubeless but not the rear. I don't know enough to figure if your tire is tubeless or not other then when I look at tire prices the tubeless always seems to be more expensive. I ran the Pony Express which has Flint like DK from what I hear on tubeless and had no problems. The people that I saw having flats that day were trying to run on skinny/faster hybrid tires and it didn't work.

Good luck
Zman

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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Slowder

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Reply with quote  #3 
TLC = TubeLess Compatible? doesn't it? Think they only do the 35 in Tubeless compatible.
I don't think my SK38s have any red text on them and they run fine.

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Zurichman

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slowder
TLC = TubeLess Compatible? doesn't it? Think they only do the 35 in Tubeless compatible.
I don't think my SK38s have any red text on them and they run fine.



Langdalek slowder is probably right here. The next question are your rims tubeless compatible? Full disclosure I guess you know gravel riding can become addictive right? lol


Zman

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langdalek

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Quote:
Full disclosure I guess you know gravel riding can become addictive right?


I'm hooked...but not sure my rims are!!!! 

My only complaint with gravel riding is that it is taking away from my mountain biking [cool][biggrin][biggrin]
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drwelby

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Reply with quote  #6 
The stock rims won't be tubeless-ready.

Can you make it work? Maybe if you have an air compressor and lot of time to go back and forth to the hardware store.

A Stan's Cyclocross rim strip might work too.

But it might be better (and safer) to put it off until you get the real setup.

If you want the tubeless for dealing with thorns, you can put the sealant in your tubes, you just need tubes with removable valve core stems.
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Pynchonite

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Reply with quote  #7 
The Gravel King SK's should set up pretty easily, once you have a tubeless rim strip installed (I recommend Stan's as well, though Gorilla Tape can work).  I wouldn't recommend pressures above about 45 PSI once you have them on - maybe 50 PSI to get it seated, if you're having trouble, but non-tubeless rims don't have the same bead-retaining shapes as tubeless-ready rims and so have a hard time holding onto tires at higher pressures.  I would check your clearance before mounting them: I've got a GK SK on a 20 mm inner diameter rim and it blimped out to 40 mm across.
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Slowder

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Reply with quote  #8 
It is worth Dry testing the tyres with gorilla tape and valves but no sealant - tape and valves are cheap. Sealant is expensive and messy so if it isn't going to work save yourself some pain.
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chunkyhugo

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by langdalek


I'm hooked...but not sure my rims are!!!! 

My only complaint with gravel riding is that it is taking away from my mountain biking [cool][biggrin][biggrin]

Ditto. My 29er hardtail has been redundant since I bought my gravel bike and riding my old xc routes on it is much more fun.
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Gibby

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Reply with quote  #10 
it’s time to replace the tires on my CoMotion Klatch. I started with Clement MSO tubeless.
I just spent over an hour attempting to mount Panaracer gravel king SK on my tubeless Rolf Hyalite wheels. Using a compressor, these just would not seal. I gave up and put the Clement back on the rim.
This is my third tubeless tire, and the hardest to seal. My second tubeless was a IRC tire on a new Co Motion tandem that I recent built.
Anybody else have a hard time mounting the Panaracer?

Patrick
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thumper88

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibby
it’s time to replace the tires on my CoMotion Klatch. I started with Clement MSO tubeless. I just spent over an hour attempting to mount Panaracer gravel king SK on my tubeless Rolf Hyalite wheels. Using a compressor, these just would not seal. I gave up and put the Clement back on the rim. This is my third tubeless tire, and the hardest to seal. My second tubeless was a IRC tire on a new Co Motion tandem that I recent built. Anybody else have a hard time mounting the Panaracer? Patrick


Seems like the gravel world is rife with stories of tires that fit easily on some wheels and not on others, wish I had good advice, but I just mounted some SK 35mm on pretty wide wheels and they sealed up with one blast from the little potable tank, much easier than two or three others Ive tried. I did use furniture polish/wax on the bead which may have helped...
but this stuff seems to vary hugely with different wheels for the same tire, or vary a lot by tire for a specific wheel...
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Pynchonite

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Reply with quote  #12 
I wasn't able to seat them with a floor pump like I could my Sectors but they sealed up after 2 minutes with a gas station air compressor and a valve adapter.  Never tried Rolfs but it could be that their bead seat is a bit different.  I was seating them to Stan's Crest rims.
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Pynchonite

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by thumper88


Seems like the gravel world is rife with stories of tires that fit easily on some wheels and not on others, wish I had good advice, but I just mounted some SK 35mm on pretty wide wheels and they sealed up with one blast from the little potable tank, much easier than two or three others Ive tried. I did use furniture polish/wax on the bead which may have helped...
but this stuff seems to vary hugely with different wheels for the same tire, or vary a lot by tire for a specific wheel...


Yeah, I usually spray down both beads with hand soap in water and that speeds things along.
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Zurichman

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Reply with quote  #14 
gibby I have read where riders put a tube in a tire that is hard to set up. let it set up over night and then just break the bead on one side and take the tube out. good luck it seems like no rhyme or reason as to how the tubeless tires set up as I see that ted guitar had a hard time setting up kenda Flintridge pro while myself and others had no problems at all. guessing it must be a 50/50 gamble.


zman

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If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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Gibby

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Reply with quote  #15 
Thanks Zman. I took your advice. I put tubes in and let them sit for about a day. Took the tubes out, sprayed the bead with soapy water and it was very easy.
It’s time to go for a ride, and compare them with what they replaced. Clement MSO
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bobknh

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Reply with quote  #16 
My $.02: after having no difficulty with tubeless install of last year's 35 mm GK SK's on a non-tubeless rim (HED Tomcat),  I had a lot of trouble recently getting a new pair of 40 MM SK'S to seat on the same rims -- even with a compressor. It could be a problem with the rim tape, which I hadn't replaced; or some other problem with these older rims. Rather than try to figure it out, I just installed them with tubes. Certainly worth trying to get your's to seat with good quality tape and valve from Stan's. If you can get them to seat without sealant, I would recommend injecting at least 2 oz. of sealant - Stan's or Orange Seal endurance. Mine were on my bike for over a year with no problems. I did have to inject fresh sealant a few times, though. It certainly is worth trying to get yours to seat. Someone suggested injecting sealant into your tubes. Although my tubes do have removable valve cores, I don't think that sealant works very well inside butyl tubes. I'd be interested if anyone has real world experience using sealant in a butyl tube.
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