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NoCoGreg

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Reply with quote  #1 
Just a PSA...

Just an FYI that several of the local bike shops have been using Gorilla Tape to setup tubed and tubeless wheels.  The mechanics I've spoken with say it works great and no failures.

Best of all - it's cheap!

It's available at most hardware stores, usually in the duct tape section.  It comes in several widths but is easy to tear or cut to the desired width - which is good because not many bikes have 1-7/8" or 3" width rims.

Here's a link to the black version I'm using.  I imagine the silver and white will work just as well:
https://www.gorillatough.com/product/black-gorilla-tape/
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reubenc

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Reply with quote  #2 
I've used this and it worked well for me. I am currently using WTB tubeless tape and Silca tubeless tape, and they are also working well. Not sure if they're better. I think they're lighter, but not cheaper. I just felt more comfortable using a bike-specific product when I got my new bike.
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dangle

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Reply with quote  #3 

Greg,

We usually agree on a lot, but I can think of at least a half dozen Gorilla tape setup failures I have fixed for friends just in the last year. Both the duct tape style and the clear stretchy 'repair' stuff. I would be interested in your long term take on your Gorilla setup. Seems that the setups I saw soaked up sealant and then eventually lost the bond resulting in a loose, heavy rim strip. I know some people have had good luck and even ENVE sent their wheels out the door with Gorilla tape for a little while.

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brando

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Reply with quote  #4 
I am using Gorilla Tape in two wheelsets for MTB and gravel. My LBS installed in the MTB wheels in February, and I bought 1" Gorilla Tape and put it in my gravel wheels in March. Both have held up great since then, though I need to put more sealant in the MTB wheels so maybe I'll take a closer peek when I do.


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drwelby

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Reply with quote  #5 
I've heard of the same long-term problems with Gorilla tape. But it also sets up really well. It's like Compass tires - either you totally love the stuff, or you swear you'll never touch it again.
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NoCoGreg

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thanks for all the responses.  I have two bikes setup with Gorilla: one tubeless and the other with tubes.  I'll report back if and when I run into problems.  Both setups are far too new to give meaningful into at this time.  I expect that if either bike experiences problems it'll be the tubeless setup.  I'll also keep in touch with the shops which are using Gorilla tape so see if they are having any issues.

Cheers,
Greg

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clarksonxc

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Reply with quote  #7 
I got a set of Enve M60HVs that came with Gorilla Tape.  Everything was fine, until I wanted to swap the tires for a different tread pattern.  The tires were nearly impossible to remove; tougher than any others I have dealt with.  The kevlar bead casing was slightly damaged, but I was eventually able to remove them with a bench vise and a screwdriver.  If I would've had to make a repair on the road I would've been SOL.  I attribute this condition to two things:

1) the thicker Gorilla tape (2 wraps) increased the bead seat diameter enough to make the tire fit more than 'snug'
2) the adhesive is extremely sticky, and it adhered to the tire bead as I was trying to remove it

Since then I switched to the tape that November bikes sells, and haven't had close to the same issues (even going back to the same set of tires)
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JSinLR

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Reply with quote  #8 
I used Gorilla (2 layers) on two sets of wheels. I don’t think it holds air any better or any worse than another wheelset I have that I used Stan’s tape. I usually cut the the Gorilla tape down to 3/4” using a razor because even the 1” wide tape is a little too wide on some wheel beds. Gorilla tape is much easier to work with than Stan’s tape. The Stan’s tape is a bit thicker but my experience was it didn’t want to lay flat on the wheel very well (maybe I had an old roll). I’ve had the tape on my wheels for a year and a half.
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CC

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Reply with quote  #9 
The best LBS in my city, who specializes in MTBs, almost always use Gorilla, unless the customer specifies not to.

Go figure...
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Spreader

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Reply with quote  #10 
I have gorilla on a tubes wheelset. I use WTB tubeless tape on my three tubeless setups. What happens with the gorilla rims when spoke work has to be done? I had a road wheel re laced and the wtb tape came off clean and I have it a “just to be sure” wipe with varsol.
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HollyBoni

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CC
The best LBS in my city, who specializes in MTBs, almost always use Gorilla, unless the customer specifies not to.

Go figure...


No offense, and i'm not trying to criticize your LBS, I just don't like this argument. Just because they do something at a shop it doesn't necessarily mean it's right. Bike mechanics are not gods. 

My first job ever was working as a full time bike mechanic actually... And i'm just a random dude who learned to wrench at home. 

(Also one of the reasons I quit was because I was forced to do shady stuff by the owner all the time to cut down on time, but of course that's not true for every shop.)
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Konass

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Reply with quote  #12 
Long story short is yes it works. If you are super cheap, if you are in a pinch, it might be the solution for you. But there are better options out there that are thinner, lighter, and come off cleaner. But they may cost a few bucks more. 
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drwelby

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Reply with quote  #13 
If your goal is to save money you can also buy bulk rolls of Scotch 8898 Strapping Tape. It's basically the same stuff as Stans. $6 for a 55m roll.
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oleritter

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Reply with quote  #14 
The Scotch is pretty good.  Tesa tape IMO is even better.  We've been using the 4288 Tesa tape on all of our wheels for about three years.  It is a 4 mil tape and we always use 2 layers.  We buy it in 3 different widths.  Problem is most places that sell the Tesa, or other tensilized polypropylene tapes, will only sell in cases.  Way more than even a wheel builder can use in a reasonable amount of time.  So we will sell off individual rolls.  Another local wheel builder/bike shop has picked up on this tape and is now asking for more.   IMG_20171228_142457701.jpg  IMG_20171228_142624006.jpg I, too am pretty skeptical about bike shops using Gorilla tape.  I seriously wonder if it is an economy thing.  To me it seems like Gorilla tape goes back to ghetto tubeless days.  I'm not saying it doesn't work, but I don't think it is reliable long term, and there are better ways now.  Duct tape doesn't belong on a bike!   IMG_20160523_125600095.jpg 

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dangle

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Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by drwelby
If your goal is to save money you can also buy bulk rolls of Scotch 8898 Strapping Tape. It's basically the same stuff as Stans. $6 for a 55m roll.


I'm with oleritter on this one. While I use 8896/8898 pretty often due to the price, it's not the same as Stan's or Tesa. Tesa is such a pain to buy in the USA though.

Out of curiousity I did one of my mt bike wheels with Stans two years ago and one with 8896. Same tires and sealant. I pulled the tires off this spring and the Stans still looked new. The 8896 was still holding air perfectly, but the end of the tape was coming up a bit and you could tell sealant was getting into the adhesive. That tape came up super easy when I replaced a spoke. I left the Stans tape on the front wheel.

Oleritter, I would totally buy some 24/25 mm Tesa tape if you're selling it.
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oleritter

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Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dangle


I'm with oleritter on this one. While I use 8896/8898 pretty often due to the price, it's not the same as Stan's or Tesa. Tesa is such a pain to buy in the USA though.

Out of curiousity I did one of my mt bike wheels with Stans two years ago and one with 8896. Same tires and sealant. I pulled the tires off this spring and the Stans still looked new. The 8896 was still holding air perfectly, but the end of the tape was coming up a bit and you could tell sealant was getting into the adhesive. That tape came up super easy when I replaced a spoke. I left the Stans tape on the front wheel.

Oleritter, I would totally buy some 24/25 mm Tesa tape if you're selling it.


This was exactly my experience.  I also saw the Scotch tape lifting and sealant migrating underneath.  I never saw a failure as a result.  The Tesa seems to stick and stay stuck.  Good cleaning and prep work and application technique I think is important, too.

I'm actually almost to my last personal roll, so I don't have any for sale at the moment.  But I think it's time to order up a new batch.  I think the best thing would be to just email me directly and we can coordinate.  I was selling them on Ebay for $11 and $12 shipped per roll.

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clarksonxc

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dangle

Oleritter, I would totally buy some 24/25 mm Tesa tape if you're selling it.


Yes, any chance you could list the lengths/widths that are for sale?  Or direct us to the facebook page/website?  Thanks!
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CC

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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HollyBoni


No offense, and i'm not trying to criticize your LBS, I just don't like this argument. Just because they do something at a shop it doesn't necessarily mean it's right. Bike mechanics are not gods. 

My first job ever was working as a full time bike mechanic actually... And i'm just a random dude who learned to wrench at home. 

(Also one of the reasons I quit was because I was forced to do shady stuff by the owner all the time to cut down on time, but of course that's not true for every shop.)


I never said they were right.  

I was simply pointing out another perspective across the course of the discussion - that while there are those who advice not to use Gorilla Tape, there are the who swear by it.
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HollyBoni

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Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CC

I was simply pointing out another perspective across the course of the discussion - that while there are those who advice not to use Gorilla Tape, there are the who's wear by it.


Sure, I think that's true for most things, for example there are people that swear the earth is flat. [biggrin]
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oleritter

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Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by clarksonxc


Yes, any chance you could list the lengths/widths that are for sale?  Or direct us to the facebook page/website?  Thanks!


I usually have 19mm and 24mm.  Sometimes I've gotten 50mm, but it doesn't sell very well so I might skip it.  Give me a few days and I'll post something here or on the Forum somewhere.  Also feel free to just email me directly!  

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Kingfisher

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Reply with quote  #21 
Been reading & lurking for a while but figured I'd chime in on this one.  Coming from the fat bike world, tricks for going tubeless are SOP and are all over the map.  As was mentioned, Gorilla tape can and will work, but will soak up the sealant and make for a messy removal.  Then there's also the Scotch tape mentioned above, or Sun Ringle tubeless tape.  Success with either of those seems to depend a lot on the rim profile.    Method 2 is to use a split tube as a rim strip.  Basically use a tube from a smaller rim diameter and stretch it over.  Last but not least... [prepare jokes] go to fattystripper.com and buy a set of their latex rim strips.  None of the hassles of tape, sealant probs, etc. and they just work.  This is without a doubt one of the most popular setups for fat bikes and it's what I ended up having to run after having issues with tape.  Fortunately they make them for normal size wheels now too.

Hope that helps.  😉
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dangle

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Reply with quote  #22 
I wasn't going to open up the fat bike can-o-worms here. I have been playing with tubeless setups for a dozen years and what applies to road/gravel/cx/mt bikes doesn't carry over well with fat bikes. It's the only time I recommend split tube. Even that will require some sort of special strip for many/most fat bike rims like sill plate insulation. 
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Kingfisher

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Reply with quote  #23 
True enough.  My bad.  [frown]  My main objective was to highlight the latex bands.  I guess I should've just said "Instead of Gorilla tape, give this a try."    
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drwelby

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Reply with quote  #24 
I'm surprised we don't have some kind of heat shrink band you can put over the rim and hit with a heat gun that forms a perfect seamless rim strip.
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dangle

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Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingfisher
True enough.  My bad.  [frown]  My main objective was to highlight the latex bands.  I guess I should've just said "Instead of Gorilla tape, give this a try."    


I wasn't trying to knock you. Fat bike tubeless is just a whole 'nother world unless you started off with fairly high end rims and tires. 
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