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frontrangegravel

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Reply with quote  #1 
Does anyone know of any good writeups, blogs, website with gravel related pics that you'd like to share? Let's hear them.

Feel free to share your own blogs/writeups, friends' blogs/writeups, or any other worthy links that have some good non-pavement content. Post away!
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DustyRhodes

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Reply with quote  #2 
I always enjoy Guitar Ted
http://g-tedproductions.blogspot.com/

Adventure Monkey takes the best pics
http://adventuremonkey.com/

I like that Gravel Bike guy too

http://www.gravelbike.com/
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Seth

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Reply with quote  #3 
Put this elsewhere on here as well.

http://therewillbedirt.blogspot.com.au/ 

if you are looking for something out of your neighbourhood (or continent).
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redline814

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Reply with quote  #4 
Here is my write up from this years Gravel Worlds -->  http://2013gw.blogspot.com/
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drwelby

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Reply with quote  #5 
Me, currently: http://grindingroundgreeley.wordpress.com/ (Northern Colorado)

Previously: http://grindingroundgering.wordpress.com/ (Nebraska Panhandle)
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Monster

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Reply with quote  #6 
Here are some ride/race reports from DK, The OGRE, Cedar Cross, etc.
http://www.teamtog.com

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GRAVELBIKE

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Reply with quote  #7 
Good stuff, this:

http://www.rsf.org.uk/

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frontrangegravel

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Reply with quote  #8 
Here's a little site I found that seems to have started doing some discussion and reviews:
Graveler.org
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MN Bike Trail Navigator

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Reply with quote  #9 
My blog, MN Bike Trail Navigator. It's winter fatbike season now, but Spring brings gravel content that's Minnesota specific. Visit here:

http://mnbiketrailnavigator.blogspot.com

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frontrangegravel

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Reply with quote  #10 
Spesh AWOL bike tumblr: http://wearegoingawol.tumblr.com/
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mnswamp

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Reply with quote  #11 
I will talk about gravel, building, racing and riding from time to time in Life in the Swamp
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jimmydot

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Reply with quote  #12 
Gravel and bikepacking picking up momentum in Oregon.

http://www.thedalleschronicle.com/news/2014/feb/01/gravel-roads-catch-oregon-cyclists/

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frontrangegravel

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Reply with quote  #13 
Meriwether Cycles shares his thoughts on his "road" bike. He's not a fan of "gravel grinder" or "monstercross"

http://meriwethercycles.wordpress.com/2014/02/22/my-road-bike/
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ayjaydee

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Reply with quote  #14 
a refreshing point of view. all these guys trying to create niches. big frogs in little puddles.
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drwelby

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Reply with quote  #15 
I don't think anyone is trying to create niches - as Whit says these bikes have always been around. I think what we're seeing is people being exposed to so much on such a micro level that we're just trying to come up with terminology to cover subtle, vague, and subjective boundaries. It's like the hairsplitting you get it certain musical genres - electronic stuff being the worst. Is this record minimal techno or microhouse? Who knows, ask the guy that recorded it!

In the case of my most recent bike, I think gravel grinder is a great way to describe it. It has a really low bottom bracket which would distinguish it from other cyclocross frame, and the bottom bracket is low since it gets ridden on gravel roads, which we mostly have around here. And it's built more for comfort than speed - for grinding out the miles. So the name makes sense to me! But I know the subtle differences - if you ask me the difference between freeride, enduro, and all-mountain bikes all I can do is shrug - it all sounds like marketing to me, but that's because I don't experience that kind of riding on a subtle level.
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ayjaydee

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Reply with quote  #16 
I do! These bikes have been around for years. These guys are merely repackaging them.
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GRAVELBIKE

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Reply with quote  #17 
Re-issue! Re-package! Re-package! 
Re-evaluate the songs 
Double-pack with a photograph 
Extra track (and a tacky badge) 

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mnswamp

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Reply with quote  #18 
And just like with music, sometimes it's the classic rendition, and sometimes a cover becomes the definitive take.  
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drwelby

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Reply with quote  #19 
Yeah, I just don't get the angst. Was Jack Taylor making a niche with the rough stuff bikes? Was Bianchi making a niche with Volpe (and Axis, and Project 7)? Was Bruce Gordon making a niche with the Rock n' Road?

We have the luxury these days of being able to pick from all sorts of bikes these days, and a lot of its being driven from the bottom up.
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Okie Outdoorsman

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Reply with quote  #20 
Hello all,
Here is a link to my personal blog that I write about gravel riding in Northeast Oklahoma:

http://www.okieoutdoors.blogspot.com

I have a lot of fun riding mostly gravel and some pavement in-between.  
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frontrangegravel

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Reply with quote  #21 
Okie, thanks for sharing. You have a lot of great pictures there! Nice job. It looks like you're enjoying Oklahoma.
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frontrangegravel

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by drwelby
Yeah, I just don't get the angst. Was Jack Taylor making a niche with the rough stuff bikes? Was Bianchi making a niche with Volpe (and Axis, and Project 7)? Was Bruce Gordon making a niche with the Rock n' Road?

We have the luxury these days of being able to pick from all sorts of bikes these days, and a lot of its being driven from the bottom up.


Interesting discussion going on in the comments of this post: http://ridinggravel.com/editorial/editorial-gravel-is-not-a-fad-repost/

I don't get the angst either. Just a quick look around shows a lot of people spending a lot of time and resources either thinking about riding, planning to ride, reading about riding, or getting the tools they need to ride all of the different things going on. Almanzo anyone? I'm not sure the "big frog in little puddles" doesn't fit here.

One look at the Okie Outdoorsman blog (he just posted on this thread) gives you a glimpse at what people checking in here on this site and others are up to. 


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drwelby

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Reply with quote  #23 
I'm still flummoxed by  "just ride 28's!" and "convert an old bike!" as a necessary and needed counterpoint.

I have some friends, a couple that are active, but not hardcore athletes. They bike commute, run 10ks. They live on the edge of the corn belt in an area with lots of dirt roads and some great canyons.

Running wasn't really agreeing with their bodies anymore so they decided to look more into cycling. They decided they would get a tandem, and weren't going to mess around. If they were going to make the investment, they were going to get something nice. We're talking Rohloff hub, belt drive, the works. They didn't want these expensive features because they were 'high-end'. They wanted the belt drive because they didn't need to lube it. They wanted the Rohloff because it seemed so much simpler than dealing with derailleurs.

They asked me for my opinion on what to get. I agreed that the Rohloff would accomplish their goals. The belt drive I didn't have opinions on. The only thing I suggested to them was that they get the frame designed for 29er tires. They could run road tires for doing road tours, and they could put on something fatter for riding locally and doing some exploring away from cars.

They didn't go for it. They didn't want a 'mountain bike' tandem because they weren't going to be riding gnarly mountain biking. They didn't want to ride the gravel roads because they were afraid they were going to slide out on the gravel. So they spend a lot of time riding on the rural highway getting buffeted by cattle trucks going 70mph instead of these nice backroads.

I consider this a failure of marketing.

Was it the bicycling industry that failed because they didn't sufficiently push a 'niche' down my friend's throats?

Did the 28ers fail by not convincing them that it's ok to ride 28S EVERYWHERE, and maybe giving them a skills clinic on how to ride skinny tires off road? And how to replace a tube when you pinch flat on tandem with a Rohloff and dual belts?

Or is it a failure that no one was there to find them a used mountain bike tandem in a small rural town and then help them order all the right parts to make the conversion?




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Okie Outdoorsman

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Reply with quote  #24 
Thanks Frontrangegravel.

The gravel roads in this part of the state run through the most beautiful scenery.

I appreciate the information that you and GT put out for us on this site as well as GT's blog.  Have gathered some very practical information through it.  Have been reading posts on this site for a long time before joining in on the discussion.  Still consider myself a newbie, but learning every time I go out.

I like what drwelby says about gravel bikes. It is all about getting information to the end user.

 My first bike was the Defy road bike and I tried riding the 23's on gravel, but had no luck at all.  Almost lost it numerous times.

Finally, I went back to the LBS where I bought the road bike and told them I was tired of not being able to go down the gravel roads that are everywhere where I live.  By the way, it is about an hour drive from where I live, and ride, just to get to the closest bike shop.  They showed me some cross bikes and then the Revolt.  I loved the Revolt and that is what I purchased.  They told me that it was a "Gravel Bike."  No regets there, at all. Am very GLAD that it was marketed as a GRAVEL bike, as I was a total newbie, and had no idea of what to look for.  I just knew that I was tired of not being able to ride further than a 1/4 of mile down a gravel road on my road bike, and almost wiping-out time after time.  Took the Revolt home, and haven't looked back at all.  Didn't hesitate and took it down every dirt road within 50 miles of where I live.  Still doing it...
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SargentCountyGravelCult

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Reply with quote  #25 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Okie Outdoorsman
Thanks Frontrangegravel.

I appreciate the information that you and GT put out for us on this site as well as GT's blog.  Have gathered some very practical information through it.  Have been reading posts on this site for a long time before joining in on the discussion.  Still consider myself a newbie, but learning every time I go out.


Ditto, I'm still pretty new to riding gravel/MMR's & I have to say that the information that I get from you guys is a great help. I've been doing gravel centuries races for a couple years now, but I've really been riding small town gravel roads since I was young (BMX coaster brake slides ruled!). It's what was around & looking back on it I had some pretty good roads to ride on in SE North Dakota.

Keep up the good work.

 

 

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