The Riding Gravel Forum
Register Calendar Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
sully

Member
Registered:
Posts: 20
Reply with quote  #1 
Going to be bouncing between two different spots this winter, wondering if I can just leave the road bike in one location rather than drag the gravel bike back and forth. Obviously I'm going to try it out, but would like to know how crazy I am for thinking this. I'm a big guy(230) so I can only lower the tire pressure so much.

The road does have a fair amount of potholes, if that makes any difference. It's also a one lane road that might see one vehicle per mile per hour, so taking up the entire road for favorable lines is completely fine.
0
ljsmith

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 249
Reply with quote  #2 
I guess it depends on what "okay" means to you. For me, 28mm tires are for smooth pavement only. You can use them and I have rode 60 miles on a crushed limestone rail trail on 28mm tires. By the end of my ride my body was hurting from all the vibration, I did not think they were okay.
0
Barrettscv

Member
Registered:
Posts: 65
Reply with quote  #3 
I have the 28mm Gravelking and it's a good tire for pavement, including rough and poorly maintained paved roads. It's not ideal, but it's possible to use a 28mm Gravelking on bad paved roads.
0
bobknh

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 588
Reply with quote  #4 
My $.02: I come from a road racing background, converted to gravel a few years ago and I've been changing my perspectives on equipment continually. Like you I ride mostly on hard pack unpaved roads, and a some paved roads that would be better off unpaved! But, I only weigh 145 pounds. IMHO wider is always better! Let me qualify that by saying, it depends on the tire as well. From what you are describing, you would probably be best off with something like a Schwalbe 35mm G- One Allround tubeless. You can run these puppies at much lower pressure than your 28mm GK's, and get surprisingly low rolling resistance on a wide range of road surfaces. In my case, I'm replacing my 35mm Bon Jon's with these. Although the BJ's are light, supple, and very fast, I occasionally hit conditions like washed out road sections with 2" gravel, non-maintained forest roads and class A trails, which make me yearn for a beefier tire. The G-Ones are more up to the task, and don't suffer much in speed over better surfaces.
0
HollyBoni

Member
Registered:
Posts: 29
Reply with quote  #5 
You can do it but it's not going to be comfortable unless you go really slow. I have taken my 28s everywhere, but I couldn't do dirt roads for too long, it was way too uncomfortable both for my backside and wrists (steel frame and fork). With 28s it's also pretty easy to get rim strikes at lower pressures. 


0
sully

Member
Registered:
Posts: 20
Reply with quote  #6 
Update: They work fine on dirt hardpack roads. But you have to choose your line and go around potholes.  Gravel is okay...ish.  But I have to slow down from the hardpack.  So the when the road was flat it kinda sucked, pace wise.  But it's doable.  Going up small graveled inclines was fine, but I didn't enjoy coming down.  I also suck at descending, for what that's worth.

In conclusion: If you have a road bike-and want to see if unpaved roads are for you?  These are great tires to demo whether or not you want a gravel bike.  But if I had a cross or gravel bike, I would not use them.  

Not at 28mm at least.  Who knows, the bigger ones might be great.

They measured small(26mm) compared to the listed size.
0
chas

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 189
Reply with quote  #7 
I have done it.  the biggest problem I had was jarring in my wrists and hands on long rides.  There is a limited amount of cush you can get from 28mm.  If vibration isn't a problem, I'm fine (not optimum, but fine).

most of my 28mm tires measure 26-27.  One exception is the conti GP4000 S2 which is much bigger.
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.