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Bike John

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Reply with quote  #351 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RipRap
Word to the wise, ditch the crappy thru axles Bontrager specced on these bikes. Invest in the DT ones. Soooo much better.
Do you happen to know the six digit Trek part numbers for those DTSwiss/Bontrager RWS thru axles?

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hdoll

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Reply with quote  #352 
Are you able to use SRAM 11-36 cassette with the stock Ultra derailleur?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikevano
Had a chance to put my SL6 through its paces at the Cascadia Super G gravel race. Great day, and a few part swap outs helped a lot. A 17 degree stem made for a much more comfortable ride, and a SRAM PG 1170, 11-36T cassette made all the difference on some long, and often steep, climbs. I noticed quite few guys with without the big rear cassette were cooked after the first climb. I also put on a new set of bars that are a little more comfortable for me. Pretty happy overall, but I think a front IsoSpeed would take this bike from good to great.

VoamQ5q7LSAzVNQExsOtPHPpcu4TdpPdKB9zwlnFAA8-2048x1536.jpg 
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mrbadwrench

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Reply with quote  #353 
The stock axles suck when you first get them but after you remove/install them a few times they are fine.
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doug_id

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Reply with quote  #354 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bike John
Do you happen to know the six digit Trek part numbers for those DTSwiss/Bontrager RWS thru axles?


W525029 & W530957. Will run you about $100 bucks for the pair if you pay full MSRP
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mikevano

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Reply with quote  #355 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hdoll
Are you able to use SRAM 11-36 cassette with the stock Ultra derailleur?



Yes, I had to adjust (right turn) the B-screw on the derailleur a little bit, but works great!


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Crockett

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Reply with quote  #356 
First ride with my alr, so far so good. Happy the way it rides.

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Crockett

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Reply with quote  #357 
Second picture

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Johnnypedals

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Reply with quote  #358 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crockett
Second picture


Nice bike! How about a build list
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Crockett

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Reply with quote  #359 
Thanks!
I build the bike up with some parts from my roadbike and some new parts.
Sram Force group set
Dtswiss CRC 1400 wheels
Vittoria Terreno Dry tires
Sram Red 11-30
Absolute black 40t oval
KMC SL chain
Wheelsmfg bottom-bracket, threaded version
XTR spd
Bontrager Montrose pro seat
Zipp service course sl seatpost and stem
Zipp sl 70 aero handlebar
Lizard skin tape
Zipp sl bottle cage
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Crockett

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Reply with quote  #360 
I also had the problem with the lockring, this was my sollution.

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chas

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Reply with quote  #361 
Road CC slams the checkpoint in this review.
http://road.cc/content/review/243301-trek-checkpoint-sl-6

Of course bikes are pretty good these days if the only thing you can complain about is the gearing, lack of isospeed in the front and that the stock tires are not wide enough.  

It does rather highlight the confusion over what a "gravel" bike really is.  What works for one person may not work for the next.
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Bike John

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Reply with quote  #362 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chas
Road CC slams the checkpoint in this review.
http://road.cc/content/review/243301-trek-checkpoint-sl-6

Of course bikes are pretty good these days if the only thing you can complain about is the gearing, lack of isospeed in the front and that the stock tires are not wide enough.

That article almost perfectly sums up why I haven’t bought a Checkpoint.

My experience riding on poorly maintained pavement was that the Checkpoint front end actually rode worse than a front-IsoSpeed Domane (with narrower tires running at marginally higher pressures).

As for too-tall gearing, the one thing that the Checkpoint does have going for it is that the front derailleur “braze-on” can be adjusted for smaller chainrings, where the Domane mount is already at the minimum with a 50/34 compact. Which of course doesn’t justify the lack of a proper subcompact in the first place. I get that Shimano is really late to the party when it comes to adventure/gravel gearing, but Trek should know better.
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jazzymusicman

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Reply with quote  #363 
The cable routing issue they pointed out is also a pain in the a$$. My LBS didn't trim the cables and they stick out a ton before entering the frame. When your knees are sunburnt and caked in mud and you have to get out of the saddle the cables rubbing up on them is aggravating.

I'm surprised that they were able to have the strangleholds in the shortest position with the Riddlers on there. Either the carbon frame doesn't have the clearance issue or they just didn't add it to the writeup. Having the redshift shockstop stem and 45s definitely helps with the stiff front end. 

I don't think the bike is as bad as they make it seem in the article
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DrBagg

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Reply with quote  #364 
I will happily keep on riding my Boone
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Chader09

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Reply with quote  #365 
I honestly like the idea of using a RedShift ShockStop stem, rather than the Trek Front IsoSpeed.  Having the front end with more possible travel, comfort and adjustability makes more sense to me.

Complaining about stock tires is a bit silly, IMHO.  There are so many ranges of places and roads that people will use this bike, you are going to be hard pressed to please most people.

I wanted to really like the Checkpoint, and it hits many good points.  But I feel myself leaning towards the Warbird V4, if the final specs, geo and build are desireable.
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Bikeguy

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Reply with quote  #366 
So they got a bike, slammed the stem, and are surprised the cables are too long? Get bent... 

I have Riddlers on my alloy checkpoint slammed. They fit fine. 
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jazzymusicman

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Reply with quote  #367 
you have the strangleholds in the shortest position with riddlers and the tire doesn't rub against the rear derailleur arm? can you post a photo?
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ilikepizza

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Reply with quote  #368 
Interesting review. I have a checkpoint, love that bike. Here are my unsolicited comments on the review:
Swapped the tires right away, but wasn't buying it for and don't care what the tire review is, I don't understand spending any sentences on the topic. Same for saddle. Regarding gearing, I've been able to ride anything I've encountered just fine including some steepish hills at Almanzo 100. Intrigued on a 1x setup though. Rigid front end...guess I am too inexperienced to really notice or have expectations. Cable routing-its poor. I took mine back to the shop and had them cut the excess down and now its pretty nice and tight, so i can see the complaints on this part but also the fact that you can mitigate it. It doesnt get in the way of a frame bag or anything which is good.

But from pavement to trails to gravel roads that bike has been a hell of a lot of fun to ride whether commuting, social, or racing. Maybe I am the target market in the article...

From the few DK posts I've seen (admittedly by Trek sponsored riders) they seemed to think the bike performed well.
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Bikeguy

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Reply with quote  #369 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzymusicman
you have the strangleholds in the shortest position with riddlers and the tire doesn't rub against the rear derailleur arm? can you post a photo?


You mean the front derailleur? I have mine built 1x. 
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jazzymusicman

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Reply with quote  #370 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bikeguy


You mean the front derailleur? I have mine built 1x. 


yeah, that's what i meant 😃
and that would explain it
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Dinger

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Reply with quote  #371 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzymusicman
you have the strangleholds in the shortest position with riddlers and the tire doesn't rub against the rear derailleur arm? can you post a photo?


The 105 and Ultegra F/D's don't have an actuation arm so they make for better tire clearance.
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jazzymusicman

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Reply with quote  #372 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dinger


The 105 and Ultegra F/D's don't have an actuation arm so they make for better tire clearance.


you're right. when i previously looked to see if i could hack on a 105 FD with the Tiagra shifter, I had only found the FD-5800 which also has the long arm. I just saw that the FD-5801 doesn't. Time to play around with it!

I bought my ALR4 a few days before a race and it was the only variant available for immediate shipping at the moment. That meant I was stuck with the Tiagra. It's a very smooth shifting groupset but alas I would've loved 105 or Ultegra

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