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sgtrobo

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Reply with quote  #51 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GOTA
Did anyone end up buying a 2018 Diverge?  There seemed to be a lot of interest.  A review by any owners would be great.


yup, waiting for delivery on a 2018 Expert. Goign to go with a Quarq power meter and possibly upgrade the gearing to either Force 22 (50-34t/11-32t) or keep the Force 1 and go with a 44t front chainring

i'll provide a full ride report as soon as I possibly can. [smile]
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bwepps

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Reply with quote  #52 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GOTA
Did anyone end up buying a 2018 Diverge?  There seemed to be a lot of interest.  A review by any owners would be great.


I have an Expert on order for me and a Carbon Comp Women's on order for my wife.

I have had the pleasure of doing several rides on a DEMO Carbon Comp.  I took it on some gnarly gravel roads and even a singletrack trail.  The bike feels super snappy and light.  Love the Future Shock too - it really does the job and smooths out chatter & the rough stuff.  

I'd love to get an update on WHEN these bikes are arriving, but Specialized and my LBS don't know much more other than they are on a container ship somewhere...
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KeithC

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Reply with quote  #53 
My shop called me today saying my Expert has shipped from Specialized and it should be here in 3 days or so.

Now the issue is that the Lauf True Grit just came out. it looks really nice. It's 2 pounds lighter that the Specialized, $200 more though. Don't know if I should stick with the Diverge or go Lauf.
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bwepps

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Reply with quote  #54 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeithC
My shop called me today saying my Expert has shipped from Specialized and it should be here in 3 days or so.

Now the issue is that the Lauf True Grit just came out. it looks really nice. It's 2 pounds lighter that the Specialized, $200 more though. Don't know if I should stick with the Diverge or go Lauf.


WoW!  That's pretty exciting news on the Expert.  Out of curiosity, where are you located?  

Also, what's the weight on the Lauf True Grit?  I don't know the weight of the Diverge Expert, but with the SRAM Force X1 and Roval SLX24 rims it should be a very light build - definitely sub 20lbs.
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sgtrobo

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Reply with quote  #55 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bwepps


WoW!  That's pretty exciting news on the Expert.  Out of curiosity, where are you located?  

Also, what's the weight on the Lauf True Grit?  I don't know the weight of the Diverge Expert, but with the SRAM Force X1 and Roval SLX24 rims it should be a very light build - definitely sub 20lbs.


someone in another forum weighed his newly-received 54cm Expert, it was under 19 lbs without pedals or SWAT
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KeithC

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Reply with quote  #56 
The Lauf is 17.2. The Diverge is supposed to be 18.7. So not quite 2 lbs.

Ordered mine in Lawrence Kansas.
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bwepps

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Reply with quote  #57 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sgtrobo


someone in another forum weighed his newly-received 54cm Expert, it was under 19 lbs without pedals or SWAT

Interesting.

My 2016 Diverge Expert was sub 18lbs with the Axis 4.0 Wheelset.  The Future Shock definitely adds a bit of weight.
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sgtrobo

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Reply with quote  #58 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bwepps

Interesting.

My 2016 Diverge Expert was sub 18lbs with the Axis 4.0 Wheelset.  The Future Shock definitely adds a bit of weight.


10r vs. 9r FACT carbon as well as the future shock, plus I think the frame is a bit more burly since it handles bigger tires and is designed to withstand more intense off-road riding

<=2016 Diverge was kinda like a <=2016 Roubaix almost, similar geometry, but could handle slightly larger tires. The new Diverge is a much different beast
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sgtrobo

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Reply with quote  #59 
so apparently, the 1.8" Specialized Storm Control tires on Roval Control wheels fit the Diverge.  I just got a set of 1.8s for another bike (Salsa Cutthroat) and a guy at my LBS threw the 1.8s on the rear of his new Diverge Comp, and he said they fit, with a bit of room for mud.  Pretty damned impressive.  Guess we'll see once I get my new Diverge how it fits with the Expert build.
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belopsky

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Reply with quote  #60 
Diverge Comp E5

[36677697956_3e76d70f2f_b]  [36328637650_8129c5e854_b]  [36354212742_c71f603943_b] 
First two are with the Compass Steilacoom 700x38, the third is the Barlow Pass 700x38.
I want a lighter wheelset but not sure what or if it's worth it. The Axis Elite is pretty lightweight as it is
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belopsky

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Reply with quote  #61 
oh and if anyone is wondering, that's a 56. 
I'm 5'7 but with a 32.7" inseam. I upgraded to Hover bars and dropped to a 90mm S-Works stem. I wanted a bigger frame/more comfort.
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GOTA

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Reply with quote  #62 
Those pictures are great.  Love the color.  It's much better than it looks on the Specialized site
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Sideways8

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Reply with quote  #63 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GOTA
Did anyone end up buying a 2018 Diverge?  There seemed to be a lot of interest.  A review by any owners would be great.


I’ve had the Diverge Comp (2018) for a few days and have 70 miles on it. 85% of that has been on gravel. So definitely not a long-term review, but enough for some initial thoughts. For some perspective on my perspective, I live in middle-America, which has endless gravel roads but I’ve ridden road bikes almost exclusively for 20+ years. I ride a Look 695, which is basically the opposite of what the Diverge is. But the option to pick a road - any road, was calling.

 

Weight: My first impression of the 2018 Diverge Comp is that it’s heavy. I have some carbon cranks and an Ultegra group that I will be upgrading to pretty quick, so that should help. I’ve also read that the Trigger tires are pretty heavy. I like them well enough that I’ll run them out and look at other options later. I’m far from a weight-weenie snob but the bike feels a bit beastly and does impact performance. I can certainly feel the extra weight on climbs. I knew what the weight specs were before I bought it but was still a bit surprised by it.

 

Future Shock: It just works and works surprisingly well.  I’m currently running 75 psi in the tires. I know that’s high, but I’m waiting on some tubes to come in and don’t want to pinch flat. I’ll look at going tubeless later but for now, the Future Shock is doing a great job even with stiff tires. It doesn’t do much for big or moderate hits, but I can see and feel it working on large chunky gravel. Honestly, I couldn’t be happier with it. And its performance on broken pavement is smile-inducing and fun. Something my road-specific bike is not. I do think that the cockpit would probably still benefit from a carbon stem and bars and I plan to add at least a carbon stem at some point to see what it does. I have had the Future Shock unit out, and it is surprisingly heavy. I wonder if Specialized will ever introduce a carbon version of some kind. Who knows. But I think the Future Shock is no gimmick, at least in this specific case. I hope they continue to develop and refine it because I honestly believe they are on to something. I’ve read so many forum posts about how ridiculous suspension is for gravel bikes but I also remember reading debates on the benefits of mountain bike suspension and whether it should be used at all, in early 90s bicycle publications. So, the Luddites can rant on about suspension in the gravel world but I like it and think it has its place.

 

That CG-R seat post: That thing flexes so much. I typically ride a 56 but a 54 in the Diverge and  it fits me well with a 100mm stem. Due to the design of the bike, a lot of the seat post mast is exposed and probably just a bit more in my case. I’ve found the amount of flex while on pavement to be annoying, especially at higher cadence. I can really see and feel it bouncing. But once the bike is on gravel, I don’t feel the “bounce” anymore and only feel it sucking up road chatter. I was focusing on what the seat post was doing on some especially large and rough gravel and it was just fantastic. I stayed seated during miles of big gnarly gravel and was completely comfortable. It wasn’t even something I was conscious of for quite a while, so I think that’s a good sign. It really works that well, and for that reason, I’m going to keep it. I’ll probably never love how much it flexes while on the pavement, but it’s a small price to pay for the excellent job it does on gravel, which is where this bike will spend a bulk of its time.

 

Performance: Stable… so nice and stable. Even in thick loose gravel, it holds a line. My bike- handling skills are nothing to write home about and I can feel the benefits of the Diverge’s geometry. I’ve read concerns about the low BB height, but in my specific case, that is not a concern. I don’t ride or have tight single track, I have miles upon miles of rolling gravel roads. So I can’t speak to other types of terrain, but the Diverge eats up middle-American gravel with pleasure. Climbing has been nice but I’ve wanted more gears. It’s fine for now, but climbs get steep and loose enough here that I imagine I’ll add some teeth to the cassette at some point. I do feel the CG-R seat post bounce a bit when spinning up climbs but it’s not terrible or too distracting, but it is there. I have also felt more road chatter in my feet than I expected while on rougher gravel. I suspect that once I put the carbon cranks on, some of that will be muted a bit.

 

I wish: I wish they had added a seat post retention system like the Roubaix. I’m not crazy about a seat post collar in 2017, but it’s not the end of the world.  Lighter Future Shock… speaks for itself.  Higher quality carbon - I’m honestly not that familiar with Specialized’s carbon tech, but I assume their higher end carbon layups would be lighter. I know there are “reasons” for the carbon they used, but I’m assuming that the weight of the FACT 9r carbon is higher. And with weight being a thing on this bike, any little bit would help.

 

Conclusion: I doubt this bike will propel me to a CX or a bunch sprint victory, but neither will my legs these days. It just does several things pretty well. I wanted to be able to hang in a group road ride without needing too much extra wattage and then turn off onto a dirt road and hammer out miles of gravel. It seems to do that. Specifically, I was looking for a gravel bike that had a little suspension, could do a bit of bike packing, eat up lots of gravel, and perform well enough on pavement. When considering price and everything else I was wanting, this bike ticked all of the boxes. Expectations rarely meet reality but In the case of the Diverge, for me it has. Even with the limited mileage I’ve put on this bike so far, they have been almost entirely new roads to me. That is fun at the purest level. I know any number of bikes could do what I’m looking for but I feel pretty confident that I’ve made the right choice for my wants. I won’t be hanging up my road bike by any time soon, but the Diverge has added an entirely new dimension to my enjoyment of this sport.

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Rudy

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Reply with quote  #64 
Hello! Could anyone post real photo(s) of the Expert 2018?
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GOTA

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Reply with quote  #65 
I was able to get a nice test ride of a Diverge Comp on some crumbling asphalt.  I wish I could have tried it on gravel but there was nothing for miles around the shop.  They did recommend a bad road route which was at least better than nothing.

I was really surprised how stiff the bike was.  I was expecting something plush but this felt as stiff as a Tarmac.  I thought it was much stiffer than the old Diverge.  It makes sense if you're racing.  I'm not sure I'd like it for regular riding.

The future shock worked exactly as advertised.  I didn't even know it was moving most of the time.  It was very impressive.

The bottom bracket is very low.  I was wondering how that would work on some of the fire roads in my area.  I would think there would be real issues with pedal strikes.  The bike shop told me that no one had told them about those problems but I'm still not convinced.

On the flip side the stability was awesome.  No issue at all bombing down a steep hill with some seriously bad pavement.  It also felt zippy speeding through corners.  Many times that low bottom bracket makes bikes feel boat like cornering but that wasn't the case here.

It was an interesting bike.  Not really for me given the stiff frame but I definitely feel that anyone looking for a new gravel racer would really appreciate this new Diverge.

I would like to try the aluminum model that belopsky posted above.  I'd be interested to see if they made it as stiff as the carbon.  These days there are plenty of alloy bikes that are not the harsh and jarring rides of years past


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sgtrobo

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Reply with quote  #66 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rudy
Hello! Could anyone post real photo(s) of the Expert 2018?


diverge-full.jpg 

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bwepps

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Reply with quote  #67 
Just picked up my wife's Carbon Comp yesterday.  Added some Supacaz Bar Tape (Celeste) for some matchy matchiness...  We absolutely love the color scheme!!  (My Green / Gallardo Orange Expert arrives at my LBS tomorrow!).  [biggrin]

Karens Diverge Carbon Comp.jpg

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chas

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Reply with quote  #68 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GOTA


I would like to try the aluminum model that belopsky posted above.  I'd be interested to see if they made it as stiff as the carbon.  These days there are plenty of alloy bikes that are not the harsh and jarring rides of years past




Like what?

I have read multiple places that the Salsa AL warbird is more compliant than the TI Warbird, and that Specialized Allez has done interesting things with aluminum, bringing it close to Carbon in lightness, stiffness, and compliance.  Any other interesting AL bikes?
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chas

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Reply with quote  #69 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sideways8

That CG-R seat post: That thing flexes so much. I typically ride a 56 but a 54 in the Diverge and  it fits me well with a 100mm stem. Due to the design of the bike, a lot of the seat post mast is exposed and probably just a bit more in my case. I’ve found the amount of flex while on pavement to be annoying, especially at higher cadence. I can really see and feel it bouncing. But once the bike is on gravel, I don’t feel the “bounce” anymore and only feel it sucking up road chatter. I was focusing on what the seat post was doing on some especially large and rough gravel and it was just fantastic. I stayed seated during miles of big gnarly gravel and was completely comfortable. It wasn’t even something I was conscious of for quite a while, so I think that’s a good sign. It really works that well, and for that reason, I’m going to keep it. I’ll probably never love how much it flexes while on the pavement, but it’s a small price to pay for the excellent job it does on gravel, which is where this bike will spend a bulk of its time.



Your comments about the CG-R are interesting.  My experience is totally different, and I’m wondering why.  I can hardly tell mine is on there.  It does take some of the harshness out of my aluminum frame, but it does not absorb shock. 

 I have a Thudbuster ST, and it is wonderful on gravel (although it requires a smooth cadence at high RPM – which isn’t a problem for me).  My Thudbuster seems a lot like your description of the CG-R, with the addition that it can take a bigger impact.  It is great on rough roads, washboard, or single track.

My CG-R is a disappointment.  It does very little to change the ride.  I can not get the horizontal V section elastomer to flex, as it flexes in the original CG-R release video.  Looking at other CG-Rs at the shop, I can get no visible flex in the seat post V.  It is a well damped light seat post – it absorbs vibration, but not a shock that I would get from a rough road.   Mine does not bounce at all, even at high speed high RPM pacelines rides.  It does make my stiff aluminum bike ride more like a carbon bike though (i.e. absorbs chatter and harshness from small vibrations, but not impact from bumps).

I tend to ride the thudbuster on gravel rides, and the CG-R on fast road rides.

I’m wondering why your experience is different?  Once difference is that I have horizontal top tubes, meaning that I have relatively little seat post exposed.  Specialized tends to have a lot of seat post exposed when they spec this on a bike (like yours).  Maybe that is the difference between your and my experience?  That the seat post flexes a lot more when more of it is exposed?

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ljsmith

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Reply with quote  #70 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chas


Your comments about the CG-R are interesting.  My experience is totally different, and I’m wondering why.  I can hardly tell mine is on there.  It does take some of the harshness out of my aluminum frame, but it does not absorb shock. 

 I have a Thudbuster ST, and it is wonderful on gravel (although it requires a smooth cadence at high RPM – which isn’t a problem for me).  My Thudbuster seems a lot like your description of the CG-R, with the addition that it can take a bigger impact.  It is great on rough roads, washboard, or single track.

My CG-R is a disappointment.  It does very little to change the ride.  I can not get the horizontal V section elastomer to flex, as it flexes in the original CG-R release video.  Looking at other CG-Rs at the shop, I can get no visible flex in the seat post V.  It is a well damped light seat post – it absorbs vibration, but not a shock that I would get from a rough road.   Mine does not bounce at all, even at high speed high RPM pacelines rides.  It does make my stiff aluminum bike ride more like a carbon bike though (i.e. absorbs chatter and harshness from small vibrations, but not impact from bumps).

I tend to ride the thudbuster on gravel rides, and the CG-R on fast road rides.

I’m wondering why your experience is different?  Once difference is that I have horizontal top tubes, meaning that I have relatively little seat post exposed.  Specialized tends to have a lot of seat post exposed when they spec this on a bike (like yours).  Maybe that is the difference between your and my experience?  That the seat post flexes a lot more when more of it is exposed?



Your experience with the CG-R are spot on.  I had one and it really didn't flex at all.  This was confirmed by Bike Radar when they tested it.  I swapped mine out for an Ergon.

http://www.bikeradar.com/us/road/gear/article/best-soft-riding-rigid-seatposts-for-road-dirt-and-gravel-46208/
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bwepps

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Reply with quote  #71 
2018 Diverge Expert X1.jpg 
My Expert is in and I'll be picking it up today.  [biggrin]

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sgtrobo

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Reply with quote  #72 
Congrats! Full ride report expected!
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GOTA

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Reply with quote  #73 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chas


Like what?

I have read multiple places that the Salsa AL warbird is more compliant than the TI Warbird, and that Specialized Allez has done interesting things with aluminum, bringing it close to Carbon in lightness, stiffness, and compliance.  Any other interesting AL bikes?


I have a BMC ALR which is the aluminum version of their carbon race SLR race bikes.  The quality of the ride is fantastic.  Very smooth and comfortable.  If they can do that with aluminum on a race bike they can do it with endurance or gravel bike.  

On the other side I rode an aluminum Giant TCR a couple of year ago that so harsh I could feel every crack in the pavement.  Cannondale CAAD 10s weren't that bad but they weren't that far off either.

You really have to ride everything because you just can't tell from the frame material.  I'm sure there are even some harsh steel bikes out there, though I haven't ridden one yet.


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GOTA

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Reply with quote  #74 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bwepps
2018 Diverge Expert X1.jpg 
My Expert is in and I'll be picking it up today.  [biggrin]


These are really great looking bikes.  Enjoy!
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belopsky

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Reply with quote  #75 
My future shock seems fine, i dont know. theres certainly give when in the drops and trying to sprint up a hill.

is it bad? no. is it different? yeah.


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